QUAERITUR: Music during the consecration

From a reader:

Lately, the music director at our church has been “tickling the ivories” during the Consecration. While at the piano, in the front of church (naturally), he has been playing tunes, based on hymms for sure, on the piano during the entire Consecration (with a well timed pause during the elevation). It’s not irreverent, but it does sound like “lounge music“. [As the non-liturgical instrument, the piano, nearly always does.] I find it annoying, and keep wondering when Tony Bennett comes on stage (I’m kidding, of course). [Put a brandy snifter with a dollar bill on the piano next time and see if he gets the hint.]
Is this permissible? I tried to looking this up in Canon Law on the Vatican site, but did not see any prohibition.

This is NOT permitted.

There must be no music during the consecration.  This has been repeated in many documents, but Redemptionis Sacramentum made it clear again:

[53.] While the Priest proclaims the Eucharistic Prayer “there should be no other prayers or singing, and the organ or other musical instruments should be silent”, [cf. GIRM 32] ….

[53.] Dum Sacerdos celebrans Precem eucharisticam «profert aliae orationes vel cantus non habeantur, atque organum vel alia instrumenta musica sileant», ….

And the General Instruction Of The Roman Missal states:

32. The nature of the “presidential” parts requires that they be spoken in a loud and clear voice and that everyone listen to them attentively.[Cf. Sacred Congregation of Rites, Instruction, Musicam sacram, March 5, 1967, no. 14: Acta Apostolicae Sedis 59 (1967), p. 304.] Therefore, while the Priest is pronouncing them, there should be no other prayers or singing, and the organ or other musical instruments should be silent.

32. Natura partium «praesidentialium» exigit ut clara et elata voce proferantur et ab omnibus cum attentione auscultentur. Proinde dum sacerdos eas profert aliae orationes vel cantus non habeantur, atque organum vel alia instrumenta musica sileant.

Pretty clear.

The music director should be given a copy of these texts.  If the problem persists, inform the parish priest.  If the problem persists, notify the local bishop.

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60 Responses to QUAERITUR: Music during the consecration

  1. Darren says:

    I had visited a certain parish a few times in the past where this took place… along with other things like glass “chalices” used for distribution of the Precious Blood to the people, and placed on a side altar for adoration… Franciscan priests wearing jeans and sandles under their vestments while celebrating mass, among other things… …also, this is a parish where – when the Franciscans (OFM) left and the diocese appointed a new priest as pastor… the homosexual music director quit because the new pastor affirmed Catholic teaching on homosexuality and gay “marriage”. At least, it appears, thing ultimately got better at that parish… but I wonder where did those Franciscans go?

  2. Andrew says:

    I have seen this at various parishes in my town along with a cute dimming of lights at one place. Why don’t they realize that so great a mystery does not require any theatrics? That in fact any sort of theatrics are nothing short of being offensive?

  3. jbosco88 says:

    It reads as though the Musician is trying to recreate Mystery in the Eucharist, or at least try to emphasise that this is an important moment. Catechising on the Truth makes the Truth more mysterious. Perhaps that’s what is needed here?

    If they did the red and said the black throughout, there is a powerful liturgical crescendo to the most sacred moment, which nothing can overpower or increase.

  4. Dominic Maria says:

    304.] Therefore, while the Priest is pronouncing them, there should be no other prayers or singing, and the organ or other musical instruments should be silent.

    I assume all of this dosen’t prohibit pious practice such as praying the rosary?

  5. Bryan Boyle says:

    Funny…I tried that brandy snifter with a dollar bill crammed in it once at my parish which seemed to be on a kick to banish the organ from the repertoire…Father.was.not.amused. But, the use of the lounge music piano was curtailed a bit. I still grit my teeth when I hear it though. You’d never expect to hear a 16-chest Casavant instrument in a dive bar…so, shouldn’t you not expect to hear an instrument more suited to that environment in a house of worship (and, yes, I know there are wonderful piano concerti and other opera that bring out the wonders of that instrument….but, in this day and age, their use is more pedestrian…)?

  6. Tradster says:

    “Should be silent”, “should be no other prayers or singing”. I wish they would discard the wiggle words that liberals can drive a truck through, and replace them with a firm “must be”. [Remember: Those are translations of the Latin documents. Find out what the Latin says.]

  7. Supertradmum says:

    I think the present Pope said no piano is to be used for liturgical music, as it appeals to the emotions and not the rational soul. I can find it in a bit…..I know for sure that Pius X did, of happy memory in Tra le Sollecitudini. Here is the line: The employment of the piano is forbidden in church, as is also that of noisy or frivolous instruments such as drums, cymbals, bells and the like.

    I think Pope Benedict said something about the guitar as well, but if I brought that up in most parishes, I would be tarred and feathered…

  8. Fr.WTC says:

    “32. The nature of the ‘presidential’ parts requires that they be spoken in a loud and clear voice and that everyone listen to them attentively.”
    I understand that this liturgical law governing the celebration of the Mass in the OF reflects a fundamental principle of the N.O. (the congregation must participate actively at all times). I cannot but help think that this requirment for an audible consecration is also an expression of “rupture” which has unfortunately been codified into the N.O.. In a future reform of the OF this principle needs to be revisited and hopefully corrected.

  9. asperges says:

    On the Continent – where they usually disregard all rules as a matter of course – in the old rite, it was not unknown for music to be played after the Consecration, but not before. Again in the EF, a polyphonic Sanctus can account for much of the period up to the Consecration, and sometimes, the Benedictus can then fill in much of the time after.

    In the New Rite, polyphonic Masses are a now problematic since the celebrant cannot proceed with the canon until the singing is finished. The lack of concurrent action, so common in the old, has been entirely lost and results in awkwardness and can cause tension between choir and celebrant.

  10. AnAmericanMother says:

    I will speak up in very limited fashion for the piano —
    When our choir is singing difficult polyphonic works (some Palestrina or early polyphony like Josquin or Ockeghem, which tends to throw singers because it doesn’t proceed as it ‘should’ from a modern singer’s point of view), we get out of the choir loft because the pews are narrow and stretch the choir sideways until we can’t hear each other (we would love to pull out a couple of pews and arrange chairs in a semicircle, but that ain’t happening).
    We go up to the back, between the organ pipes, where is stashed a nice little Steinway grand. Our music director supports any parts that are having trouble with soft piano (because of its percussive effect piano is better for that than organ anyhow). So long as we are a 100% amateur choir, discretion is the better part, etc. etc.
    But lounge music during the Consecration? Never happen. Our director is very old school (as you can tell from the music selection. :-) )

  11. Giuseppe says:

    I went to a school whose consecration at Mass often went like this
    1 – A zestily sung “Holy, holy……Hosanna in the highest!”
    2 – Piano vamps while priest does something at the altar – gets a little quieter when priest is elevating something, but starts to swell at the line “Let us proclaim…”
    3- Piano leads a rousingly sung “When we eat this bread, etc.”
    4- Piano vamps while priest seems to do some sort of follow-up prayers
    5 – Piano starts to swell again as priest raises some things at the altar and says “Through him… etc.” to crescendo with a lustily sung “Amen”
    THEN PIANO FALLS SILENT as the Our Father is spoken!
    Fear not, though. There will be more music.
    Sometimes we’d have a verse of “Peace is Flowing Like a River” during the extended sign of peace.
    Then we’d have an emotively sung “Lamb of God” worthy of an 80s Broadway musical.
    The priest would elevate something, but the Lamb of God chord progressions could still be heard in a piano vamp.
    We’d keep singing something during the entire communion (stand-and-stretch) and cleanup.
    Finally, the principal celebrant (the pianist) had a rest (gave him or her time to get the closing hymn ready).

    With the pianist as the principal celebrant, I felt a calling. I felt inspired to study the piano more seriously. But I didn’t think much of seminary.

  12. wmeyer says:

    AnAmericanMother:

    As to the piano, I am prepared to welcome it with open arms, if only we can banish the drums!

  13. APX says:

    My uncle is the Music Director at my home parish. He’s been playing the piano and organ during Mass for over 20 years and has been adopting “strange habits” lately, including the above mentioned. I’ve been tempted to address it on a subtle personal level the same way I dealt with the Gloria and Kyrie that went missing last summer, but made a quick return once I subtly pointed it out.

  14. Mary Jane says:

    Never been to a Mass where music was played during the consecration…well, okay I take that back – once, just once, I have experienced it, but it was an accident. What happened was, Father didn’t wait for the choir to finish singing the Sanctus/Benedictus, and he went on with the consecration while we were still singing the polyphonic setting (Christmas Midnight Mass a few years back). It was…odd. We didn’t know whether to stop or continue singing…the director chose to finish…not sure if that was the best decision, but there it is.

    I have been to a Mass where the lights were dimmed (I think the priest meant well because the OF was very reverent and he used quite a bit of Latin). One commenter above hit the nail on the head, I think – theatrics are not needed, the consecrtion is O Magnum Mysterium without the theatrics. :)

  15. mvhcpa says:

    If I am right, the “Mass Desecration” (Mass of Creation” has as a part of its full implementation actual SINGING by the priest (not of the chant variety either) up to, through, and including the Consecration. My wife said it made the consecration sound like children’s story (think a la Mr. Rogers). Is such a consecration sung in “pop” style even valid (I would guess so, but it still makes me wonder)?

    Michael Val
    (who will probably make a lot of enemies here by confessing, although he likes Gregorian chant at any Mass, he does not like either polyphony or the pipe organ AT ALL)

  16. APX says:

    @Mvhcpa
    That’s a throwback to the Folk Masses. The Glory & Praise song book are full of Mass Settings like that. They didn’t do it at my parish, but it was quite common at the parishes in the small towns I attend during the summers when we were camping.

  17. lh says:

    Taze them when they get carried away. ;)

  18. Supertradmum says:

    I highly recommend a re-reading or first reading of this by the Pope
    http://media.musicasacra.com/publications/sacredmusic/pdf/liturgy&music.pdf
    and Cardinal Burke http://catholicaction.org/2011/03/beauty-in-the-sacred-liturgy-according-to-the-teaching-of-pope-benedict-xvi/
    and, of course, this http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/pius_xii/encyclicals/documents/hf_p-xii_enc_25121955_musicae-sacrae_it.html

    If someone can convince me that the highest form of art in music is the piano or guitar, fine. If not, why are we still stuck in the 1970s mentality, which is not lifting our minds and hearts up to God, but enjoying ourselves.

  19. Marion Ancilla Mariae says:

    Darren noted (above) “Franciscan priests wearing jeans and sandles under their vestments while celebrating mass, among other things . . .

    Franciscan priests would quite properly wear the traditional sandles and the brown habit under their vestments while celebrating Holy Mass. Jeans, however, would not properly be a part of that picture.

  20. wanda says:

    Mass of Creation, Mass Desecration annnnd Massive Cremation.

  21. Darren says:

    Anyone, please correct me if I am wrong, but regarding:

    Dominic Maria: I assume all of this dosen’t prohibit pious practice such as praying the rosary?

    I have been taught that we should not be praying the rosary, or any other prayer, during mass. If we are doing so we are not focused on the mass itself. The consecration is the high point of the mass and on that we should be focused.

    @Marion Ancilla Mariae: Franciscan priests would quite properly wear the traditional sandles and the brown habit under their vestments while celebrating Holy Mass. Jeans, however, would not properly be a part of that picture.

    The priest did have his brown habit on, but with bunched up jeans showing from underneath.

  22. Chris Garton-Zavesky says:

    The instruction from the 1960′s puzzles me. Pius X forbade frivolous and noisy instruments, and Pius XII noted that to require a rigid uniformity — by which he means among other things, the banning of the praying of the rosary — would not be in keeping with the spirit of the liturgy or right thinking in general.

    For many hundreds of years the canon was silent. Now, suddenly, the nature of the presidential prayers requires that they be said audibly? Something doesn’t make sense. What about the instruction which permits them to be said quietly?

  23. Suburbanbanshee says:

    There’s nothing wrong with the Franciscan guy wearing work trousers under his robe; apparently the first Franciscans did that, so probably the first Franciscan priests did, too.

    The problem is that he either didn’t fold the pant hems up out of sight, or that the way he bunched them up looked messy and that you could also see that. Probably it didn’t occur to him, because nobody has ever taught him about that part of a priest’s vesting.

    St. Francis liked stuff to look nice for Christ, which was his guys were always donating nice vestments and other stuff for Mass out of their poverty. So presumably, Franciscan priests should be concerned about that. (Fr. Thompson’s bio of St. Francis talks a lot about St. Francis’ concern for proper liturgical stuff, right down to carrying a broom with him to sweep chapel floors, if one he visited was dirty.)

  24. Luvadoxi says:

    Not about singing during consecration per se, but has anyone noticed that the new musical setting for the Sanctus has a bit where the tenors sing out “Lord, Lord, Lord” in a very distracting and lame-sounding way? Drives me nuts.

  25. St. Rafael says:

    Dominic Maria: I assume all of this dosen’t prohibit pious practice such as praying the rosary?

    No, that prohibition was not against individuals with their own silent prayers, but for public singing and praying done by the choir and congregation as a whole. There is nothing wrong with Catholics reciting their own private devotions during Mass, as long as they are not loud and distracting.

  26. Suburbanbanshee says:

    Re: priests singing, I’m fairly sure that priests are always allowed to chant or sing all the parts of the Mass. Obviously, doing the actual chant is better than doing a composer’s version.

    And even when priests were saying their bits under their breath, it was never really supposed to be “silent.” Just very, very quiet. “Silent” would have meant that the priest was supposed to only say the prayers mentally. If air is moving and enunciation is taking place, a prayer isn’t silent.

  27. acricketchirps says:

    @ Mary Jane.

    In the 1961 Liber Usualis, in the “Rubrics for the Chant of the Mass” section of the “Preface to the Vatican Edition of the Roman Chant”

    VII When the Preface is finished, the choir goes on with the Sanctus and Benedictus. If these are sung to Gregorian chant they must be given without a break; If not, the Benedictus may follow the Consecration. During the Consecration all singing must cease, and (even if there is a custom to the contrary) the organ or other instrument is silent. It is preferable that there should be silence from the Consecration to the Pater noster.”

    Perhaps the priest was expecting the polyphony to end after the Sanctus and the choir to start up the Benedictus again after the Consecration.

  28. mamajen says:

    I can’t recall whether our church has music during the consecration or not. I don’t think they do. But it bugs me to no end how they think we need a piano soundtrack while the priest prays at other times. This isn’t a movie, TV show or Broadway production for goodness sake! Why the need to apply worldly elements to the mass. Ugh! Sometimes I feel like I’m watching Mister Rogers.

  29. St. Rafael says:

    Suburbanbanshee: There’s nothing wrong with the Franciscan guy wearing work trousers under his robe

    He wasn’t just wearing trousers, but jeans. A priest should not be caught dead wearing jeans inside of a Church. The house of God demands our best attire, and that does not include such casual dress like shorts or jeans. Not to mention the aesthetic inferiority that is jeans. Dress pants is what men should be wearing inside of Church.

    The only time jeans are acceptable, is when they are part of a work uniform and the lay man is attending Mass before or after work. Which is rare, because nobody goes to Mass before work anymore. 60 years ago, when there were 2 or 3 priests at most parishes, and 6 Masses a day, workers would go to morning Mass or noon Mass before and during work. Nowadays, there are no more midday Masses and most parishes have one daily Mass in the morning, in which you won’t see a soul under the age of 50 attending.

  30. Darren says:

    St. Rafael: …nobody goes to Mass before work anymore. 60 years ago, when there were 2 or 3 priests at most parishes, and 6 Masses a day, workers would go to morning Mass or noon Mass before and during work. Nowadays, there are no more midday Masses and most parishes have one daily Mass in the morning, in which you won’t see a soul under the age of 50 attending.

    Actually, ay my parish which has 7 AM and 9 AM daily mass, you do see a lot of younger people at the 7 AM mass. When I worked locally I usuaed to go to 7 AM mass before work, and I was still 30-something at the time (now I am 40-something). I would love daily mass if I didn’t have to get up at 4 AM to get to the church near work in time for their daily mass.

    From what I do see, this IS rare. (mass times at least) However, there are two parishes near me (one in the same town) that have a 12 noon or slightly past noon mass on weekdays.

    Most of the people I have seen at daily mass are probably under the age of 40 or over the age of 70 (many retirement communities in my area). In ten years will those numbers be under 50 and over 80?

  31. jbosco88 says:

    Wasn’t there a special fanfare played when the Pope elevated the sacred species at Papal Masses in the Tridentine Rite? There’s certainly a clip of John XXIII on Youtube with that happening.

    (I’m not advocating music be played at this point…)

  32. Sissy says:

    In the local church here, the only music of any kind is produced on an electronic keyboard. The individual playing does some sort of dramatic “organ” riff all through the consecration. It sounds like the accompaniment to an old silent movie. Very “Phantom of the Opera”.

  33. Stephen Matthew says:

    Is it reasonable for the organist or pianist to softly play a single note at certain points to give the priest the correct pitch for the chant? That seems a reasonable option, but perhaps not.

    I know of a monestary where these parts are chanted, and the solution they use is having a monk with perfect pitch chant the first couple sylables, on his own quietly, so the principle celebrant and all concelebrants will know how on and on what pitch to begin the next section of the chant, this being particularly helpful when a large number of priests from outside their community are visiting and concelebrating.

    Maybe in a normal parish a tiny earpiece to give the priest the right pitch? After all, most people have some skill with finding relative pitch, put many can not find a true pitch for sight singing unaided.

  34. wmeyer says:

    To my earlier note, I welcome the piano only at times when music of any sort is permitted.

    There are times in the Mass for silence, and I have seen all too often that these times are too brief.

  35. Mom2301 says:

    Oh, the brandy snifter idea is too good. I may have to give it a try.

  36. AnAmericanMother says:

    Stephen Matthew,
    We use two alternatives, depending on the preference of the celebrant.
    1. The celebrant sings the incipit in whatever register is comfortable to him, then the choirmaster quietly gives the choir the pitch on the organ, and off we go.
    2. The choirmaster plays a little embroidery before the chant, ending on the correct pitch for the priest.
    The priests are already wearing lapel mikes, so an earpiece in addition might just send them over the edge.
    I personally think we’re too amplified already. When we had a sound system failure one time, I noticed two things (both nice things): the priest was perfectly audible (it’s a traditional building), and the congregation quieted down in their efforts to hear well. You could have heard a pin drop in the place, and you could certainly hear the celebrant!

  37. Mary Jane says:

    @ acricketchirps, thanks – I am familiar with the Liber, but had not read section part before. I can’t remember if we were in the middle of the Sanctus when he started or whether we had already begun the Benedictus…can’t remember. The choir director made the decision not to stop, perhaps I should have myself, but I was still fairly new in the choir and I followed her lead. It hasn’t happened since (and since then we usually sing the Benedictus after the consecration – if it’s polyphonic – as the Liber rubrics state).

  38. jesusthroughmary says:

    Chris Garton-Zavesky says:
    9 July 2012 at 10:25 am
    “For many hundreds of years the canon was silent. Now, suddenly, the nature of the presidential prayers requires that they be said audibly? Something doesn’t make sense. What about the instruction which permits them to be said quietly?”

    A great question which I have asked several times in the past without ever receiving a satisfactory answer.

  39. RichR says:

    I’ve seen this done once. It’s mood music, pure and simple. It ends up sounding like a bad soap opera. Just plain sappy. Makes you feel like you’re stuck in a time warp from the 70′s.

    Just let the priest do his unique duty up there unaccompanied. Let the silent drama unfold.

  40. Charivari Rob says:

    32. The nature of the “presidential” parts requires that they be spoken in a loud and clear voice and that everyone listen to them attentively.[Cf. Sacred Congregation of Rites, Instruction, Musicam sacram, March 5, 1967, no. 14: Acta Apostolicae Sedis 59 (1967), p. 304.] Therefore, while the Priest is pronouncing them, there should be no other prayers or singing, and the organ or other musical instruments should be silent.

    32. Natura partium «praesidentialium» exigit ut clara et elata voce proferantur et ab omnibus cum attentione auscultentur. Proinde dum sacerdos eas profert aliae orationes vel cantus non habeantur, atque organum vel alia instrumenta musica sileant.

    Does “requires that they be spoken” really mean (in this context) “the priest must speak the words” or “the priest may speak or chant/intone the words”? I would’ve thought the latter (and would hope so), but it seems to be stating the former rather bluntly. I”m hoping it’s just some nuance lost in translation.

  41. OrthodoxChick says:

    @wmeyer,
    I’ll see your piano and drums and raise you an off-key trumpet and clarinet.

    A parish in the area has all four going at once (plus singers). Wish I could say I’m kidding, but I’m not. At least they don’t play during the Consecration. Thank the Lord for small favors!

  42. AnAmericanMother says:

    MichaelVal,
    The Massive Cremation has all sorts of horrible stuff in it (it used to be the standard Mass setting in our parish under the old music director, and until our new music director finally managed to get rid of most of it with the advent of the New Improved Translation). My pet peeve was the “stage direction” that the choir will continue to HUM!??!? the Memorial Acclamation – “softly” and apparently forever. (I had it crossed out with a big penciled “NO!” in my copy.)
    I wonder if you might like the hybrid chant/polyphony, like Leonin or Josquin, or (later) Tallis’ hybrid polyphony and Sarum chant? Tallis: Audivi vocem de caelo

  43. Tom in NY says:

    @Charivari:
    Clausula relativa loquente, numero xxxii, lingua latina praeclara est, in sensu indicativo, non subjunctivo et et manent, etiam in forma subjunctiva, meo opinione. Verbum notandum est.

    Ut dicitur, Roma locuta est, causa finita est. (S. Augustinius?)
    Salutationes omnibus.

  44. AnAmericanMother says:

    Orthodox chick,
    I’ll see your tin-pan-alley band and raise you: one screechy lady of a certain age, an old dude with grey beard and ponytail AND tambourine, and a priest who thinks he can play guitar (but can’t even tune it) and can’t turn off his cellphone which starts playing samba. I don’t think that happened during the Consecration, though.
    That is my absolute benchmark for Worst Mass Setting of All Time, and I’ve never seen anything come close, even though I’ve travelled all over the Southeast to little tiny country parishes and have also endured the music in the Diocese of Richmond VA.

  45. Tom in NY says:

    erratum:
    et…et
    corrigendum:
    …et proferantur et auscultentur manent… Verbum exigit notandum est.

    Signa HTML non comprehensi; causa patientiae tibi gratias ago.

  46. John Nolan says:

    The Mass in D of Ludwig van Beethoven (usually referred to as the Missa Solemnis) has an instrumental ‘praeludium’ between the Sanctus and Benedictus which was meant to accompany the Consecration and Elevation. This Mass was written for liturgical use (although it wasn’t ready in time for the occasion for which it was written) and in 1820s Vienna ‘concert’ performances of Masses were not permitted. I can’t think of any other Viennese Masses that have this feature, including the same composer’s earlier Mass in C, but on the other hand I can’t see Beethoven disregarding liturgical norms. [It is more complicated than that, for the 19th c.]

    Sadly, I don’t think I shall ever hear this sublime work in its proper setting.

  47. OrthodoxChick says:

    @AnAmericanMother,

    I fold!! I hope I never attend a Mass that outdoes that! Although I was at a Mass three weeks ago with the usual tunes for music. The twist was the dimming of the lights for the Consecration. Someone else here mentioned it but it was a new one on me. What got me was that all of the EMHC’s were all dressed in white albs. You couldn’t tell them from the altar servers and if the priest and deacon hadn’t been wearing stoles, you barely would have been able to tell anyone apart in the whole lot. And it was the first time I had seen the Tabernacle placed so far out in left field. It was literally off the altar (which looked more like a stage set up in someone’s living room anyway) in the left corner of the church near the exit.

    That was my first time attending Mass at that parish. It was also my last.

  48. wmeyer says:

    OrthodoxChick,

    We get a violin, of uneven quality. And when we (rarely) attend the 9:00, it’s a larger group of singer, and two guitars, drums, violin, and perhaps flute. Plus piano. Saturday at the anticipatory Mass, the one singer had her microphone turned up too high, and then leaned in, just in case we couldn’t hear. The result was loud and unintelligible. But at least there were no drums.

  49. OrthodoxChick says:

    wmeyer,

    UGH! Just host the local high school marching band, why don’t we?! You know, after hanging out with you folks here at Fr. Z’s for only a few days, I became disgruntled about the OF. Now I’m just downright cranky.

  50. fvhale says:

    We have been able to stop the paid mucisians during the consecration…now, how do we stop the ringtones from the pews?

    [Lemme know when you get that worked out.]

  51. AnAmericanMother says:

    A noted above, we can’t even seem to stop the ringtones from the priests . . . .
    Presbies seem to have worked it out -
    Westminster Presbyterian, Burbank
    Demonstrating incidentally that the sermon is the focus of the Presbyterian service.

  52. joanofarcfan says:

    It seems the newest thing is the priest sings the consecration, sometimes badly. I don’t like this trend either.

    To quote my pastor: Pianos are for cocktail lounges; guitars are for protest music.

  53. St. Epaphras says:

    I’m considering putting the family on a beans/greens/cornbread/buttermilk ONLY diet (poor folks’ Southern food) with small servings and riding the bicycle to daily Mass and around town in order to save money to drive every week the 1 hr. 45 min. to the weekly EF where you have only chant and real Catholic hymns & sometimes polyphony. The way I figure it, if I were listening to chant on my iPod at the local parish during the songs such as “We are One in the Spirit” someone would be scandalized. We couldn’t have that.

  54. Mrs. Bear says:

    Back in the 90′s we used to belong to a 4 part church choir and we had various mass settings where the entire Eucharistic Prayer would be sung by the priest with the keyboard accompaniment.
    I know that when we were married we had the entire Mass of Creation sung by the priest and the organist playing along. My husband will now think he may have a valid reason for an annulment! :)
    Why would there be so many options to do this if it wasn’t allowed and why did Liturgical Diocesan leaders not inform people of what the Church allows and doesn’t??

  55. Charivari Rob says:

    @ Tom in NY: Thanks, but in case I wasn’t clear – I was asking for clarification of the English version. My Latin/translation skills are limited to occasional words, not much grammar, and a very rough sense of the phrase – I’m at the mercy of Google and Babelfish and the like.

    So, the question remains: “must speak” or “may speak or chant”?

  56. Tom in NY says:

    In the first sentence of sec. 32, exigit 3rd sing. pres. indic., controls the meaning, as “demands”, or as RP Moderator’s translation notes, “requires”. “Ut” signifies “that…..”; it is a conjunctive starting a relative clause, and generally, a subjunctive follows. Considering context, had you missed “exigit” (exigo is the root of “El Exigente”, “exact” and “exigent”) there is clara et elata voce, “in a clear and raised voice”. Hence, the comment about exigit.
    Others may set in English the et…et and vel…vel clauses in other ways.

    The nature of the “presidential” parts demands both that they are brought forth in a clear and raised voice and listened to with attention. Therefore, while the priest brings them forth, either let there not be other prayers or singing, and other musical instruments should remain silent.
    Salutationes omnibus.

  57. schmenz says:

    I hope someone brings this to the attention of the Institute for Christ the King. In some locations they have non-stop organ playing throughout the ENTIRE Mass, except for a brief pause at the Elevation.

    They say a lovely Mass but their musical instincts are a bit skewed.

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  59. br.david says:

    I have attended an OF Mass offered at a VERY famous parish Church in CHICAGO; wherein, the Sanctus and Benedictus were separated, with the latter being sung directly after the consecration. I found it particularly beautiful and moving, AND in keeping w/ the liturgical tradition of the church.

  60. Spaniard says:

    In Spain the national anthem is permitted to sound during the elevation. The Law states silence while the priest is speaking. Does it include the elevation as well?