Card. Dolan’s prayer at the end of the GOP convention

From Card. Dolan’s blog, comes the text of his prayer at the end of the 2012 GOP convention.

Since I originally post this, more text was added to the Cardinal’s blog entry.  Welcome to the blogosphere to whomever it was that posted that first entry!   o{];¬)

With firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, let us pray:

Almighty God, father of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Jesus, we beg your continued blessings on this sanctuary of freedom, and on all of those who proudly call America home.  We ask your benediction upon those yet to be born, and on those who are about to see you at the end of this life.  Bless those families whose ancestors arrived on these shores generations ago, as well as those families that have come recently, to build a better future while weaving their lives into the rich tapestry of America.

We lift up to your loving care those afflicted by the recent storms and drought and fire.  We ask for the grace to stand in solidarity with all those who suffer.  May we strive to include your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, in the production and prosperity of a people so richly blessed.

Oh God of wisdom, justice, and might, we ask your guidance for those who govern us, and on those who would govern us:  the president and vice-president, the Congress, the Supreme Court, and on all those who seek to serve the common good by seeking public office, especially Governor Romney and Congressman Ryan.  Make them all worthy to serve you by serving our country.  Help them remember that the only just government is the government that serves its citizens rather than itself.

Almighty God, who gives us the sacred and inalienable gift of life, we thank you as well for the singular gift of liberty.  Renew in all of our people a respect for religious freedom in full, that first most cherished freedom. Make us truly free, by tethering freedom to truth and ordering freedom to goodness.  Help us live our freedom in faith, hope, and love; prudently, and with justice; courageously, and in a spirit of moderation.  Enkindle in our hearts a new sense of responsibility for freedom’s cause.  And make us ever-grateful for all those who, for more than two centuries, have given their lives in freedom’s defense; we commend their noble souls to your eternal care, as even now we beg your mighty hand upon our beloved men and women in uniform.

May we know the truth of your creation, respecting the laws of nature and nature’s God, and not seek to replace it with idols of our own making.  Give us the good sense not to cast aside the boundaries of righteous living you first inscribed in our hearts even before inscribing them on tablets of stone.  May you mend our every flaw, confirming our soul in self-control, our liberty in law.

We pray for all those who seek honest labor, as we thank you for the spirit of generosity to those in need with which you so richly blessed this nation.

We beseech your blessing on all who depart from here this evening, and on all those, in every land, who seek to conduct their lives in freedom.

Most of all, Almighty God, we thank you for the great gift of our beloved country.

For we are indeed “one nation under God.”

And “in God we trust.”

Dear God bless America. You who live and reign, forever and ever,

Amen!

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41 Responses to Card. Dolan’s prayer at the end of the GOP convention

  1. mamajen says:

    He should do the exact same prayer at the DNC, including the bit about Romney and Ryan :-D

  2. It’s not too bad, though it is clearly very ecumenical, which I don’t love – but I wouldn’t have expected any different for the convention.

  3. Vivus In Christo says:

    Thank you for posting this. I tried to hear Cardinal Dolan as he prayed, but the folks from CNN decided to talk over him. (Why am I not surprised?) :(

  4. Lori Pieper says:

    It’s only a few minutes after the convention, and I can’t get through to Cardinal Dolan’s blog at all. I bet a thousand people are there trying to comment.

    I thought the prayer was great. The part where he asked people to respect the laws of God and not raise idols in their place, and recalled “the law written in our hearts before it was written in tablets of stone” really stood out, as did his call for religious freedom. I wish it had mentioned a bit more about the unborn and the threats to their lives – but maybe he should save it fore the Democrats as they need it more.

    Quite a few people in the crowd had their heads bowed — some were even crying.

    For the people who don’t like the commentary, watch as I did, on your computer – both the Fox News and CNN sites had live feeds with no commentary at all!

  5. Facta Non Verba says:

    Fox News showed his whole prayer, and I’m pretty sure it was longer than what is posted here. I know he said something in his prayer about liberty, including religious liberty. I thought it was a subtle shot at President Obama.

  6. Southern Catholic says:

    I thought it was a good prayer overall, and not too generic. Although there was some better parts as Lori pointed out above. Also, Fox was the only station I saw that didn’t have commentators talking during the prayer.

  7. Thomas S says:

    Well done, if somewhat blandly ecumenical. Though it should be noted that he crossed himself at the start. He did well not to make a speech but to actually pray the prayer, never scanning the crowd, but elevating his eyes frequently to the heavens.

    Speaker Boehner introduced him as “America’s Shepherd.” Bold touch.

    I hope he comes out in full regalia at the Dem convention. Pipe dream, I know. But the benediction at that convention is the one that can and should go further to his damage control for the Al Smith dinner.

  8. HyacinthClare says:

    We watched on C-SPAN, which doesn’t have any comments or commercials. MUCH nicer than having to hit the mute button all the time and wonder what they have decided I shouldn’t be allowed to hear.

  9. jhayes says:

    Here s the video of Cardinal Dolan’s Prayer. It is longer than the published text

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6-SaIhpqeM&feature=youtube_gdata_player

  10. Dr. K says:

    “He should do the exact same prayer at the DNC, including the bit about Romney and Ryan :-D”

    Agreed!

  11. acroat says:

    Sorry I grew up watching Archbishop Sheen on TV. Was it to much to expect him to proclaim “In the name of the Father, and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen” as he made the sign of the cross? It’s not like people don’t know he’ Catholic.

  12. Captain Peabody says:

    An excellent prayer, and quite far from generic or inoffensive, as the pointed references to the right to life, the full right to religious freedom, and especially to natural law make clear. Though the wording was somewhat ecumenical, the content was about as Christian and Catholic as one could get without including references to Mary, the Saints, or the Holy Father–and I think it’s perfectly appropriate to make ecumenical gestures at a setting like a political convention.

    Hopefully, he will pray the exact same prayer at the DNC convention–it would certainly send quite a signal, wouldn’t it?

  13. Michelle F says:

    Yes, that was a good prayer. I missed seeing it on TV, but I watched the YouTube clip provided by jhayes.

    I second acroat’s sentiment that Cardinal Dolan could and should have said “In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit” when he crossed himself, but at least the Archbishop did have the courage to make the sign of the Cross. I have yet to see a Catholic eating in a restaurant who will say grace before he eats and make the sign of the Cross – which is a very public profession of one’s faith as a Catholic.

    I also would have liked it if Cardinal Dolan had blessed the crowd at the end the way priests give the final blessing at Mass, including using the sign of the Cross. Even when I was an agnostic-wannabe-atheist with no intention of becoming a Christian, I thought Catholics were interesting, and I would have enjoyed being on the receiving end of a Catholic priest’s blessing.

  14. Michelle F says:

    By “…at least the Archbishop did have the courage to make the sign of the Cross” I meant Cardinal Dolan (the Archbishop of NY), not Archbishop Sheen. Sorry I wasn’t clear there.

  15. Supertradmum says:

    Michelle F, Two seminarians and I went to dinner at the best and most crowded Indian restaurant in London, run by a strict Muslim family and full of Muslims. I can assure you, we crossed ourselves and said the grace before meals there publicly. We bowed our heads as well.

    I, too, would have liked to have seen a Trinitarian reference at the beginning in bold style, especially as the Mormons do not have a Trinitarian Creed and we all need to be reminded of the power of the indwelling of the Trinity in all Catholics, of whom I am sure there were many present.

    However, as His Eminence referred to Natural Law, a philosophy fading away in courtrooms, political platforms and medical practices in America and gone in Europe so I was thrilled at his stressing that. I also liked his reference and prayer for the military. My only quibble would be that His Eminence could have stressed the pro-life platform with greater pointedness. I did watch it on YouTube.

  16. Phil_NL says:

    @mamajen: I was just about to post the exact same remark.

    Don’t change a single letter, say the same in Charlotte, and it would be great.

    Frankly, if he just changes the candidates names, that’s OK too. The rest will sent the D’s in ballistic mode anyway, and that only speaks volumes.

  17. Michelle F says:

    Supertradmum,

    I’m glad to hear that you and the seminarians aren’t afraid to express your faith in public, nor are you afraid to eat at a Muslim establishment!

    I was 28 years old when I decided that I wanted to enter the Catholic Church. I grew up as a military brat (USA), and then joined the Navy myself when I was 20. I’m certain that in all of the places I had been before I was 28 I had met many Catholics, but I certainly couldn’t identify any of them – except for a small group of girls in my company in boot camp, who took me with them to Mass on Sunday mornings. I don’t recall seeing anyone wearing a crucifix, or crossing themselves, or talking about God and the Church – although I heard plenty of that from evangelical/fundamentalist Protestants.

    Catholics, and especially Catholic clergymen, should not be afraid of showing or expressing their religious beliefs in public. Not only are non-Catholics impressed by people who show the courage of their convictions, they might even be persuaded to convert someday because of the Catholics’ example. The Catholic girls who invited me to go to Mass with them certainly made a big impression on me.

    We were in our 3rd week of training when on Saturday night they met as a group in the barracks while I was sitting on the floor polishing my boots. After a few minutes they moved closer to where I was sitting, and one of the girls came over to me and said, “We’ve noticed that when they have Church call on Sunday, you don’t go anywhere. We don’t think it’s good for you to stay in the compartment [barracks] all of the time. Would you like to go to Mass with us in the morning?”

    I was very surprised at the offer so I sat silent for a few seconds, but then I said “Yes.”

    They went back into their group for a few moments, and then the girl who was acting as the leader came back to where I was sitting and told me, “There are two Masses, one traditional and one contemporary. We discussed it, and we think you would like the contemporary Mass better. Is that okay?”

    I didn’t have any idea of what she was talking about, so I said “Yes” again, and I went to Mass with them the next day and every Sunday after that for the rest of our time in boot camp.

    I wish I could say that I converted then, but it took another 8 years. Even so, how they treated me, their concern for my well-being and the fact that some of them gave up going to the Traditional Mass so all of them could take me as a unified group to the contemporary Mass made a huge and lasting impression on me, and it did factor into my eventual conversion. The Protestant girls just looked at me as they left on Sunday mornings (I watched them looking at me), but the Catholic girls really saw me, and they put their faith and religion into action. I can’t emphasize enough how important this was to me, and to my conversion.

    So, Catholics must stop being afraid to be seen and known as Catholics when they are in public. The impact it can have is very great.

  18. Supertradmum says:

    Michelle F, very cool story and thanks for sharing it. Somehow, I do not think we are converting anyone by saying grace in a Muslim establishment, but we are acknowledging the Trinity as God and practising our religious freedoms.

  19. catholicmidwest says:

    mamajen,

    You’re right. He should use the exact same prayer, praying for the leaders of both parties, just as he has here.

    It sounded in place and appropriate in that hall in Miami.

    Wait and see how it sounds in Charlotte after all that will go on in that room.

  20. Mariana says:

    FAR be it from me to critisise, and I am most impressed by American political events’ actually allowing prayers, prayers at a political do in Scandinavia would cause the most profound embarrassment as being something antiquated and proved to be just another form of voodoo AGES ago, but

    “Bless those families whose ancestors arrived on these shores generations ago, as well as those families that have come recently,…”

    what about those families who were already there? If I were a native American I’d be somewhat peeved.

  21. Dad of Six says:

    “…and on all of those who proudly call it home.”

    Well, that would leave off the Obamas and most of the liberals in this country. They despise the USA…except for all of the goodies they can have here that they couldn’t have in the workers’ paradises of Cuba and North Korea.

  22. albinus1 says:

    Mariana: Even the Native Americans were not always “already here”. Their ancestors also came over as immigrants, albeit sometime during the last Ice Age.

  23. frjim4321 says:

    Thanks for posting it because I was not watching and did not see it.

    It was better than I expected. I wonder about the two posters who said the prayer he actually said was longer?

    I have a slight bias and would have probably added something about protecting those who are serving the cause of freedom around the world in our nation’s military. But then I guess that opens the door and you’d have to add other groups.

    I suspect he is wise enough to offer the same exact prayer next week substituting the appropriate names.

  24. HeatherPA says:

    Our family always says grace at restaurants, public picnics, dinners, crossing ourselves. We also make the sign of the cross over our food, as a FSSP priest advised us to do. It is good for kids to do these things publicly and learn not to be ashamed of the expressions of their faith. Sometimes we get a server who is very interested and asks us about it.

  25. John V says:

    The Cardinal’s blog has been updated, with a note that last night’s posting was incomplete. The full text:

    With firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, let us pray:

    Almighty God, father of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Jesus, we beg your continued blessings on this sanctuary of freedom, and on all of those who proudly call America home. We ask your benediction upon those yet to be born, and on those who are about to see you at the end of this life. Bless those families whose ancestors arrived on these shores generations ago, as well as those families that have come recently, to build a better future while weaving their lives into the rich tapestry of America.

    We lift up to your loving care those afflicted by the recent storms and drought and fire. We ask for the grace to stand in solidarity with all those who suffer. May we strive to include your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, in the production and prosperity of a people so richly blessed.

    Oh God of wisdom, justice, and might, we ask your guidance for those who govern us, and on those who would govern us: the president and vice-president, the Congress, the Supreme Court, and on all those who seek to serve the common good by seeking public office, especially Governor Romney and Congressman Ryan. Make them all worthy to serve you by serving our country. Help them remember that the only just government is the government that serves its citizens rather than itself.

    Almighty God, who gives us the sacred and inalienable gift of life, we thank you as well for the singular gift of liberty. Renew in all of our people a respect for religious freedom in full, that first most cherished freedom. Make us truly free, by tethering freedom to truth and ordering freedom to goodness. Help us live our freedom in faith, hope, and love; prudently, and with justice; courageously, and in a spirit of moderation. Enkindle in our hearts a new sense of responsibility for freedom’s cause. And make us ever-grateful for all those who, for more than two centuries, have given their lives in freedom’s defense; we commend their noble souls to your eternal care, as even now we beg your mighty hand upon our beloved men and women in uniform.

    May we know the truth of your creation, respecting the laws of nature and nature’s God, and not seek to replace it with idols of our own making. Give us the good sense not to cast aside the boundaries of righteous living you first inscribed in our hearts even before inscribing them on tablets of stone. May you mend our every flaw, confirming our soul in self-control, our liberty in law.

    We pray for all those who seek honest labor, as we thank you for the spirit of generosity to those in need with which you so richly blessed this nation.

    We beseech your blessing on all who depart from here this evening, and on all those, in every land, who seek to conduct their lives in freedom.

    Most of all, Almighty God, we thank you for the great gift of our beloved country.

    For we are indeed “one nation under God.”

    And “in God we trust.”

    Dear God bless America. You who live and reign, forever and ever,

    Amen!

  26. Jacob says:

    Like HyacinthClare, I watched it live on C-SPAN.

    I thought Cardinal Dolan’s prayer was a lot better than the prayer given by the Orthodox clergyman the night before. That was pretty much all social justice fluff.

    My general impression when I watched was that it was a bit rambling. The prepared text is very cohesive whereas the prayer as delivered wandered in places. Cardinal Dolan’s prayer had some interesting points. His bit about freedom being tethered to Truth: code to placate those who are not too enthused with Vatican II? :)

  27. JKnott says:

    His Eminence wasn’t shy about making the Sign of the Cross and saying: “Almighty God, who gives us the sacred and inalienable gift of life, we thank you as well for the singular gift of liberty. Renew in all of our people a respect for religious freedom in full…”

    Also hope he delivers the same prayer, with a little added exorcism prayer, at the Democratic- destruction -of -our -country- convention.

  28. frjim4321 says:

    Oh wow, the first one was way better.

  29. Cathy says:

    Pray forgive me if I am confused, but, the opening of the prayer makes it sound like Catholics believe God had four sons, not One Eternally Begotten Son, Consubstantial with the Father. Am I being picky?

  30. Jim says:

    I wonder if all our holy priests realize how powerfully evangelical it is to wear the cassock in public. Do they realize it gives confidence to their lay Catholic brethren and makes their non Catholic brethren wonder about Catholicism ? I often wonder if my life would have been very different if I saw priests who dressed like priests in my more impressionable younger years.

    Maybe, I am asking too much :(.

  31. acroat says:

    @ Cathy. I too was disturbed by that-”civility” gone to far. Jesus was true God & true man not just another son of God the Father. This omission was a disservice.

  32. Michelle F says:

    Cathy and acroat -

    Cardinal Dolan didn’t say anything about sonship in his prayer. He called God “the God of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Jesus,” all of which is true. God the Father is just as much the God of God the Son as He is for the rest of us, as would be God the Holy Spirit.

  33. Jason Keener says:

    I thought Cardinal Dolan’s prayer was good, but I think it would have made a bigger impact if he had been wearing the simar, which is the traditional cassock-like formal garment prescribed for non-liturgical functions. I’m not a huge fan of the clerical suit because I don’t think it is as distinctive as it needs to be for a person, especially a Cardinal, who is representing Christ and His True Church. Overall, though, this is a smaller matter, and we should be very thankful for all of the great work Cardinal Dolan is doing. Kudos to him!

  34. Marcus de Alameda says:

    Looking ahead to next week, I find it difficult to grasp how the Fortnight For Freedom campaign by the USCCB holds any teeth with Cardinal Dolan appearance at the DNC convention. I understand the prudent Catholic motive to stand open for continued dialogue, but when do we draw the line and refuse to throw our precious pearls before swine? The pledge and makeup of the democratic party platform does indeed qualify the organization as swine. Much in the same, would we expose our children to the company of rapists? So consider the keynote speeches preceeding Card. Dolan’s well intended benediction, such as, Planned Parenthood CEO, GBLT activists, and a pletheria of other anti-Catholic pundits including Obama.
    Where is the Fortnight For Freedom campaign now? …crickets

  35. Charivari Rob says:

    Among other things, I liked how he worked in that quote from America The Beautiful.

  36. John V says:

    Marcus

    Perhaps we should consider Matthew 5:44-48. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. For if you love those who love you, what reward have you? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? And if you salute only your brethren, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? You, therefore, must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

  37. KristinLA says:

    Marcus, I would say if Cardinal Dolan goes to the Democratic Convention to witness to the Truth as taught by Christ and His Church then I think he will be engaging in an act of true charity. If he falls short of full witness, he will be perceived as accepting or at least turning a blind eye to the evils contained in the Democratic Party Platform. This is what our God-given liberty is for: to witness to the Truth.

  38. magnificatlady says:

    I wonder if any heads will actually be exploding during Cardinal Dolan’s prayer at the Culture of DeathNC? Certainly that crowd I believe contains far too many of those that are not just in error and sinners in need of our prayers, I am referring to those that are not of God

  39. Angie Mcs says:

    I am wondering at his reception as he enters the hall. The Democrafic platform consists of so many evils, the choice of Sr. Campbell to speak, the entertainers who have spouted venom, the gay rights and abortion supporters…will these people show the Cardinal any respect as he enters, or allow him to go through his blessing without harassment?

    The Democrats all know how their President feels about the Church. I can’t help believing it will all be a sham, with Obama basking in his smugness afterwards. we shall see- I hope basic decency can still win out here.

  40. ALL: Since I originally posted this, whomever it is that was in charge of posted His Eminence’s prayer, updated it with the entire text.

  41. quovadis7 says:

    Did I miss something when I read these parts of Cardinal Dolan’s prayer?


    “Help them remember that the only just government is the government that serves its citizens rather than itself.”

    And,

    “Renew in all of our people a respect for religious freedom in full, that first most cherished freedom. “

    Our Catholic belief is that the only truly just government is the government that serves God first and foremost, rather than its citizens or itself.

    And, our “first most cherished freedom” is NOT our religious freedom, but the GIFT OF LIFE and the freedom/protection from attack that innocent life in the womb is due, which we each must have BEFORE we can exercise our religious freedom!

    Your “put-a-positive-spin-on-everything” game plan has just flat-out NOT worked Bishops. For the past 40+ years, our opposition has been exploiting you with resounding success as you lead like a bunch of prim and proper ambassadors (think of Neville Chamberlain prior to WWII in his dialogue with the Nazis), rather than as heroically courageous, confident, and inspiring Generals of the Church Militant.

    It’s high time to wake up and retool your approach, Cardinal Dolan! I’ll continue to pray daily for you and your brother Bishops, that you come to this realization before it is ultimately too late….

    Pax et benedictiones tibi, per Christum Dominum nostrum,

    Steve B.
    Plano, TX