New Bishop of Lincoln, NE: Bp. Bruskewitz retires, and Benedict XVI appoints…

Some appointments of bishops seem more significant than others.  This one is noteworthy.

Lincoln, Neb., Sep 14, 2012 / 05:05 am (CNA/EWTN News).- As the Diocese of Lincoln celebrates its 125th anniversary, Bishop James D. Conley has been named the region’s ninth bishop by Pope Benedict XVI.

“He will serve the people of Lincoln with great enthusiasm, strong leadership, and with a deep love for Jesus Christ and the Church,” Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila of Denver said in a Sept. 13 statement.

Bishop Conley, who has served as the auxiliary bishop of Denver since 2008, is a Kansas native and was raised Presbyterian.

He will succeed Bishop Fabian W. Bruskewitz, who has served the diocese for over 20 years and submitted his resignation according to Church procedure upon reaching his 75th birthday in 2010.

“In the four years Bishop Conley has served as auxiliary bishop of Denver, he has become well-known for his commitment to the unborn, his enthusiasm for young people, and especially for the devotion with which he celebrates the Most Holy Eucharist,” Archbishop Aquila said.

Archbishop Aquila assured Bishop Conley of prayers from Denver, as well as “our continued hope for his success” in his new role as shepherd of Lincoln.

Having converted to Catholicism during in college, Bishop Conley was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Wichita in 1985. [I believe he was in that group of students who studied with the late John Senior at the University of Kansas.]

He completed his philosophical formation at Mount St. Pius X Seminary in Erlanger, Ky. and his theological studies at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary in Emmitsburg, Md., earning his master’s in divinity.

As a priest, Bishop Conley served as associate pastor of St. Patrick Parish in Wichita and and as the diocesan director of the Respect Life Office.

After earning his licentiate in Rome in 1989, Bishop Conley was appointed pastor of St. Paul parish at the Wichita State University campus Newman Center in 1991.

During that time, he received both his mother and father into the Catholic Church.

In 1996, he was called back to Rome where he served as an official in the Vatican Congregation for Bishops.

While in Rome, Bishop Conley served as chaplain to the University of Dallas Rome Campus from 1997 to 2003 and as adjunct instructor of theology for Christendom College Rome Campus from 2004 to 2006.

He was named “chaplain to his holiness” with the title monsignor in 2001 by Pope John Paul II.

In 2006, he was called back to the Wichita Diocese where he served as pastor of Blessed Sacrament Parish.

From 2011-2012, Bishop Conley served as the Apostolic Administrator of the Denver Archdiocese until Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila was installed as the new shepherd.

The Diocese of Lincoln is home to over 95,000 Catholics in 136 parishes, has 150 priests and 141 women religious, and is home to one diocesan seminary, St. Gregory the Great, and one religious seminary, Our Lady of Guadalupe.

Bishop Conley will formally be installed as the new bishop Nov. 20 at the Cathedral of the Risen Christ.

Perhaps you would, in your goodness, stop and say prayers for both Bp. Bruskewitz and Bp. Conley.

New Bishop of Lincoln, NE: Bp. Bruskewitz retires, and Benedict XVI appoints…
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65 Responses to New Bishop of Lincoln, NE: Bp. Bruskewitz retires, and Benedict XVI appoints…

  1. It’s a sad thing to see one Of the most ardent heroes of Traditional Catholicism/the TLM step down, but he has to do it. However, what is this new predecessor like? Can anyone attest to the new bishop’s attitude (be it one of Favour or antipathy) to the Latin Mass?

  2. robtbrown says:

    Great news.

    He spent some months as a visitor to Fontgombault and is very close to the monks at Clear Creek. In fact, I thought he might be the next bishop in Tulsa.

  3. Rellis says:

    Here is an encouraging quote:

    “I have great love and appreciation for the Tridentine, or ‘extraordinary form’ of the Mass,” Bishop Conley said in 2011. “But I also see how the ordinary form, the Novus Ordo, has nourished and sanctified the spiritual lives of countless souls over the past 40 plus years.”

    “And yet … something has been lost,” he added. “Something of the beauty and grandeur of the liturgy. Something of the reverence, the mystery, the sense of the transcendent … the problem is not the Novus Ordo — but the license that people sometimes take in celebrating it. I would add that another big part of the problem has been the translations we’ve been using. There is a banal, pedestrian quality to much of the language.”

    Source: http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=15593&amp

  4. Amerikaner says:

    @YoungCanadianRCMale: Bishop-elect Conley has great respect for the Extraordinary Form and has been the ordaining prelate for the FSSP in Denton in the past.

  5. Glen M says:

    This new generation of American bishops is very impressive and encouraging. Deo Gratias.

  6. Liz says:

    Yea! We are thrilled to have him. He’s a GREAT bishop. We look forward to having him. (And he ordained two of the Mystic Monks!)

    We will miss our dear, good and holy Bishop Bruskewitz though!Ah gee I think he confirmed five of my children and he’s done countless ordinations for the FSSP and masses at the Carmel of JMJ. Sniff. He deserves his retirement and I’m glad he will stay in the area, but everyone in the church should be thankful to his great contribution. He is amazing!

  7. wolfeken says:

    Lincoln doesn’t quite match Denver’s beautiful cathedral, but hopefully there will be many more of these after his promotion:

    http://www.olmcfssp.org/cms/index.php/gallery/category/C7/

    This is very good news for the FSSP, who established its seminary in the Diocese of Lincoln precisely because they were confident it would remain friendly territory for many years.

  8. Iowander says:

    I used to live in Lincoln. It’s a special place. For two years, I have been hoping Bp. Conley would be appointed to Lincoln. I don’t expect they’ll be able to keep as long as they kept Bp. Bruskewitz.

  9. dominic1955 says:

    I’m from the Archdiocese, but end up in the Lincoln diocese quite a bit because of family/friends. It seems that God has smiled upon Nebraska, we have three great bishops ruling the three dioceses in our state. Bishop Bruskewitz is a great man and a true pastor. He is impeccably orthodox and beyond nice and kind. If anyone says a cross word about him its because they a) don’t actually know him or probably even met him or b) they strongly disagree with his positions-which probably means they are on the wrong side of the issue!

    I am beyond relieved that Bishop Conley has been named the new Bishop of Lincoln. If there is anyone who could fill Bishop Bruskewitz’s pontificals it would be him, just like when Bruskewitz took over from Bishop Flavin (who was also a legend, God rest him). Ad multos annos to them both!

  10. Joseph-Mary says:

    I had the thought for a long time that Bishop Conley would be named to Lincoln; he will safeguard what has been put into place there. He loves the TLM too. He is approachable and will answer people who contact him and that is a rarety among bishops in my experience. (Archbishop Chaput did as well). He is a good man and will govern the Lincoln diocese well. Denver will miss him.

  11. amymev says:

    And yet, those of us here in the spiritual desert of Las Cruces, NM are STILL waiting for a new bishop, praying to finally restore the Faith to this long-starved area. Busy Father?

  12. Flambeaux says:

    Deo gratias!

  13. Bea says:

    So sad to see Bishop Bruskewitz go.
    Under his watch:
    ..No altar girl
    ..The diocese with the most vocations to the priesthood
    ..FSSP Seminary started
    ..JMJ, Carmelite order of nuns established there
    ..Heroic Bishop, with a (I believe it was broken) injured foot, he consecrated the FSSP seminary, climbing up and down the platform/ladder to do the consecration with the blessed candles that are in the interior of the church
    ..Prayed outside abortion clinics
    ..Was a great spiritual father figure to all the priests under him.

    I wish him well and though I do not belong to his diocese, I know his absence will be a great loss to the people of Lincoln.

    May Bishop Conley have the stamina to fill his shoes.

    My heartfelt prayers go up for both of them

  14. Bea says:

    I was relieved to read the posts above. I did not know anything about Bishop Conley. He sounds like he will be a great bishop.

    amymev:
    I sympathize with you. We are in the same boat in Southern Arizona.

  15. Athelstan says:

    I’ve said a prayer for Bishop Conley – he has mighty big shoes to fill.

  16. Pingback: FRIDAY AFTERNOON EDITION | Big Pulpit

  17. Gregg the Obscure says:

    Denver’s loss is Nebraska’s gain. We’ve had quite the run of bishops here lately:
    1996 Abp. Stafford to Rome and the cardinalatial dignity;
    2004 Bp. Gomez to San Antonio;
    2010 Abp. Gomez to Los Angeles and probable eventual cardinalatial dignity;
    2011 Abp. Chaput to Philadelphia and probable eventual cardinalatial dignity;
    2012 Bp. Conley to Lincoln.

    It might be a while before Denver gets another auxiliary as it seems that the reasons for past auxiliaries included Abp. Chaput’s large number of commitments outside the archdiocese (CUA, EWTN, apostolic visitations, etc.) and the general and apparently accurate impression that he was singularly good at teaching young bishops how to be good bishops.

  18. Ralph says:

    Bea,

    I am from Southern Arizona, too.

    When Bishop Kicanas lost the election for president of USCCB I was split between happiness and sadness.

    On one hand, I was glad to see the Bishops elect a faithful man like Cardinal Dolan to the post.
    On the other – I was sad to see that we would be stuck with Kicanas until his retirement.

    It could be worse. At least he lets us have an Institute of Christ the King parish.

    Remember to pray for him everyday.

    Congratulations to Lincoln on a great new shepherd!

  19. robtbrown says:

    It’s a sad thing to see one Of the most ardent heroes of Traditional Catholicism/the TLM step down, but he has to do itM

    Bishop Bruskewitz wanted to retire.

  20. Phil_NL says:

    I’d say that at 77 (or soon 77) the bishop is more than entitled to a quiet retirement, spent sipping his favorite wine, and with his favorite Greorian chant CD in the background.

  21. robtbrown says:

    Ralph says:

    On one hand, I was glad to see the Bishops elect a faithful man like Cardinal Dolan to the post.
    On the other – I was sad to see that we would be stuck with Kicanas until his retirement.

    What did that election have to do with Bp Kicanas staying in Tucson?

  22. solemncharge says:

    I’m guessing that even though Bp. Bruskewitz is stepping down, he will still be an active presence in the Church as long as his strength holds up. Bp. Conley seems like a great fit.

  23. aragonjohn7 says:

    Hope he is awesome

  24. Supertradmum says:

    This is great news!

  25. Ralph says:

    Robtbrown,

    It was assumed by many (hoped by some) in our diocese that his election would cause a “promotion” to a larger diocese. His defeat was seen as a sign that he was not going anywhere.

    I heard as much from several clergy as well.

    Bishop K is a good man. I believe that he is sincere about what he believes. He is just sincerely wrong (in my opinion of course) about many important things.

    Many of us here in the diocese hope and pray for a more faithful bishop in the future. Our two sister dioceses in Arizona (Phoenix and Gallup) have great bishops. We want one, too! ;)

  26. incorpore says:

    Re: Comments by amymev, Bea, and others:

    There is an opportunity for particular prayer for the working of the Holy Spirit at hand. With El Paso, TX vacant for nearly a year and the bishops of Las Cruces, NM, and San Angelo TX overdue for retirement, there could be quite a change made in that corridor in the near future.

    Let us pray that the Holy Spirit provide inspiration to our Holy Father (his Nuncio, etc)!

  27. discipulus says:

    @solemncharge

    I’m guessing that even though Bp. Bruskewitz is stepping down, he will still be an active presence in the Church as long as his strength holds up. Bp. Conley seems like a great fit.

    I think Bp. Bruskewitz should be created a Cardinal at the next consistory for his outstanding service to the Church (I know, long shot). And because he is not yet 80, that would mean he could participate in a future conclave begining before his 80th birthday in 2015 (and possibly be elected Pope).

  28. Scarltherr says:

    discipulus:

    As a Nebraska native, all o what you said would be good thing!!! God bless Conley and Bruskewitz. We are thankful for our bishops here!

  29. Let’s not forget the other good thing about Nebraska– Ascension Thursday is celebrated on Thursday! Hopefully Bishop Conley will be supportive of continuing that practice.

  30. Former Altar Boy says:

    I saw the photo (above) of Bsp. Conley at an FSSP ordination. Did he conduct the ordination? Does he say the traditional Latin Mass? Will he be saying it in his cathedral? Will he maintain the altar “boys”-only standard of his predecessor? And, to underline the previous poster, will Ascension Thursday stay on Thursday?

  31. robtbrown says:

    Ralph says:

    It was assumed by many (hoped by some) in our diocese that his election would cause a “promotion” to a larger diocese. His defeat was seen as a sign that he was not going anywhere.

    I heard as much from several clergy as well.

    It almost never happens that the Pres of the Bishops Conf gets a bigger diocese. Bp Gregory is the only one I know of who did. He was moved to Atlanta.

    BTW, clergy, esp when they’ve never studied in Rome, don’t really have much of an idea of these things.

  32. Tedster says:

    Father, your are correct in stating that Bishop Conley studied under John Senior. In fact, he was roommates with Archbishop Coakley (Oklahoma City) and Father James Jackson, F.S.S.P. who all studied under Dr. Senior! I have learned recently that they are among the list of students that Dr. Senior dedicated his book “The Restoration of Christian Culture” to.

  33. AA Cunningham says:

    During the last TLM celebrated at the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Denver, 9 November 2008, Bishop Conley was the celebrant. Hard to believe that it’s been nearly four years since that occurred. Many of us pray that Archbishop Aquila will finally cease the refusal to implement Summorum Pontificum in the Archdiocese of Denver as a whole and that the requirements for a minor basilica as outlined in Domus Dei will be adhered to.

  34. frjim4321 says:

    Seems the outgoing prelate was well right of center and the incoming similar as is the fashion these days.

    On one hand I am thrilled that I reside several hundred miles to the east, but I am well aware that anything can happen anywhere any time. Basically I do the best job I can do in what I am doing, keep my head down, and bide my time until retirement.

    I would differ from the majority here who think the unreformed liturgy of the preconciliar years is the answer to all that is wrong with the world and believe that we have replaced the hermenuetic of mission with the hermenuetic of retrenchment. We’ll see what is left in 100 years – or my grand neices and nephews will.

    Meanwhile I strive for the sincerity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, the wisdom to know the difference, and the Joy that I find in every day on this side of the grass.

  35. frjim4321 says:

    Hopeful that the incoming prelate will show greater concern about protecting children in matters of sexual abuse than did his predecessor.

  36. Mary Jane says:

    God bless Bishop Conley and Bishop Bruskewitz!

    frjim4321…what?

  37. AA Cunningham says:

    Mary Jane, ignore the ramblings of “frjim4321″.

  38. robtbrown says:

    frjim4321 says:

    Seems the outgoing prelate was well right of center and the incoming similar as is the fashion these days.

    What is a right of center prelate?

    I would differ from the majority here who think the unreformed liturgy of the preconciliar years is the answer to all that is wrong with the world and believe that we have replaced the hermenuetic of mission with the hermenuetic of retrenchment. We’ll see what is left in 100 years – or my grand neices and nephews will.

    We’ve already seen what is left after 40 years of the “hermeneutic of mission”. Empty churches. Empty seminaries. Few vocations to religious orders. Catholic high schools too expensive for the lower middle class (cf. few vocations of religious orders). High divorce rate among Catholics.

    I have said more than once that IMHO what is important is Latin liturgy with ad orientem celebration. Latin is simply catholic (i.e., universal), the vernacular by definition is not. Ad orientem was jettisoned because of the incorrect notion that the Eucharist is a meal. If anyone doesn’t understand the importance of liturgy in Catholic life, I recommend the first 5 paragraphs of Sacrosanctum Concilium.

    If the Novus Ordo had been celebrated in Latin ad orientem, there would be no move to the TLM.

  39. Panterina says:

    AA Cunningham says: “Many of us pray that Archbishop Aquila will finally cease the refusal to implement Summorum Pontificum in the Archdiocese of Denver as a whole .

    Were did you get that impression from? FSSP has had a presence in the Archdiocese of Denver even before <Summorum Pontificum on Arch. Chaput’s request. And as soon as SP went into effect, a few parishes started to celebrate the Mass in the Extraordinary Form. In fact, Bp. Conley celebrated the Mass in the EF at the Cathedral, 40 years after the last one was held there.

  40. robtbrown says:

    frjim4321 says:

    Hopeful that the incoming prelate will show greater concern about protecting children in matters of sexual abuse than did his predecessor.

    That’s silly and stupid. There were a few cases in Lincoln, and they were dealt with quickly. Bp Bruskewitz didn’t need the bureaucracy of the USCCB to tell him what to do.

  41. Mary Jane says:

    frjim4321, I doubt you are the only one “biding time until your retirement”. =)

  42. frjim4321 says:

    That’s silly and stupid. There were a few cases in Lincoln, and they were dealt with quickly. Bp Bruskewitz didn’t need the bureaucracy of the USCCB to tell him what to do.

    Time will tell.

    Do you mean a few cases over the past 10 years or so?

    If that is what you mean, it’s a bit more than most places over the same time frame.

  43. frjim4321 says:

    On the other hand maybe ignoring the Charter will work out better in Lincoln than it did in KC.

  44. Reginald Pole says:

    robtbrown says:
    “If the Novus Ordo had been celebrated in Latin ad orientem, there would be no move to the TLM.”

    I couldn’t agree more. A few weeks back I had the honor of attending a NO Mass that was an eye-opener. The schola sang the Gregorian propers. The Gloria, Sanctus and Agnus Dei were sung in Latin. The congregation sang traditional Catholic hymns at the Offertory, Communion and recession. While the Liturgy of the Word was celebrated facing the people the Liturgy of the Eucharist was celebrated ad orientem at the High Altar. There were no girl “altar boys”, no polyester pant-suited platoons of EMHC, no communion in the hand. It was the most solemn NO I have ever attended. It can be done. Talk to your pastor.

  45. frjim4321 says:

    frjim4321, I doubt you are the only one “biding time until your retirement”. =)

    There’s more than 5o or more hours of good pastoral work to do in a week, so it’s not like fifteen years in a rocking chair.

  46. AA Cunningham says:

    Panterina says:

    14 September 2012 at 9:53 pm

    AA Cunningham says: “Many of us pray that Archbishop Aquila will finally cease the refusal to implement Summorum Pontificum in the Archdiocese of Denver as a whole .(emphasis added) [NB: Since 14 Sept 2007, the primary responsibility of implementing the Motu Proprio’s provisions rests with parish priests rather than the local ordinary. That doesn’t mean that diocesan bishops do not also implement the provisions, but part of the purpose of the Motu Proprio was to relieve diocesan bishops of that seemingly odious burden.]

    Were did you get that impression from?

    From reality.

    FSSP has had a presence in the Archdiocese of Denver even before <Summorum Pontificum on Arch. Chaput’s request.

    Incorrect. Our Lady of Mount Carmel Latin Mass Community was established in the Archdiocese of Denver by the FSSP on 16 July 1996 under then Archbishop Stafford. Archbishop Chaput was installed as the Archbishop of Denver on 18 February 1997.

    And as soon as SP went into effect, a few parishes started to celebrate the Mass in the Extraordinary Form.

    Kindly list the names of those parishes. The readers will note that the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception is not one of them and the readers will also note that a weekly Latin Mass at the Cathedral, as required by Domus Dei, which predates Summorum Pontificum, is still being ignored.

    In fact, Bp. Conley celebrated the Mass in the EF at the Cathedral, 40 years after the last one was held there.

    Incorrect. Bishop Conley celebrated the first Solemn High Pontifical Mass at the Cathedral in over 40 years on 9 November 2008.

    Denver: TLM wrapup

    The FSSP celebrated the first TLM in over 40 years at the Cathedral on 14 September 2008.

    Denver: 1st TLM in Cathedral in 40 years

    It should be noted that neither Archbishop Chaput nor the rector of the Cathedral attended either one of those Masses.

  47. catholicmidwest says:

    Good. He’s a convert.

  48. SweetSauerPhoto says:

    I have had the privilege of knowing Bishop Conley since it was Father Conley some almost 18 years ago when he was the pastor of the student union. Some of my friends from those days had moved to Lincoln a few years back and they are ecstatic at this news. Bishop baptized my oldest daughter, celebrated the first ad orientem Ordinary Form Mass I ever attended and was a blessing for vocations.

    Fr. Z, yes he was part of the integrated humanities program under Dr. Senior (those were great stories to hear while then Father Conley would host Dead Theologians Society). Dr. Senior was his GodFather when he entered the Church. I know that Fr. Jackson of FSSP and Archbishop Coakley all came from that family and were brother priests here together in Wichita.

    The Church is truly blessed. Prayers for Bishop Conley — and prayers for you Fr. Z

  49. robtbrown says:

    frjim4321 says:
    Do you mean a few cases over the past 10 years or so?

    The last Lincoln case occurred under Bp Flavin in 1987.

    I know of a case in Wichita over 30 years ago when a priest (asst pastor at the parish I had attended) was arrested for soliciting a police officer. Bishop Maloney had him out of the diocese quickly, sent to a rehab facility in NM. The priest later tried to reenter the diocese, was refused, and was trying to be incardinated in another diocese when he died from AIDS.

    A priest friend told me that he thinks there are two reasons for the bureaucratic production by the USCCB: 1) Providing CYOA for them, 2) Providing guidelines for bishops with no common sense or cajones(and from the revelations there seems to have been quite a few of them).

  50. robtbrown says:

    NB: Bishop Chaput has said publicly that he has no affection for Latin liturgy or the TLM but said he won’t stand in its way.

  51. robtbrown says:

    frjim4321 says:

    On the other hand maybe ignoring the Charter will work out better in Lincoln than it did in KC.

    As I said here months ago, Bp Finn’s mistake was presuming that poorly formed priests (i.e., those with doctrinal or psychological problems) were an exception.

  52. PostCatholic says:

    Another mistake was confusing the advice of police officers with legal advice from properly qualified counsel.

  53. Glad to hear that Lincoln is getting a good replacement! In the mean time, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis is patiently waiting for a new archbishop – it’s been almost a year. The new bishops and archbishops that are being made give me hope for our archdiocese. Congratulations, Lincoln!

  54. frjim4321 says:

    As I said here months ago, Bp Finn’s mistake was presuming that poorly formed priests (i.e., those with doctrinal or psychological problems) were an exception. rb

    If so, all the more reason that he should have followed the Charter; it would have prevented him from an error that was caused by vincible ignorance.

    Now there appears to be at least one suit based on allegations of impropriety during the several month failure-to-report delay. If successful, a suit based on negligence such as this will be exceedingly expensive.

  55. robtbrown says:

    frjim4321 says:

    If so, all the more reason that he should have followed the Charter; it would have prevented him from an error that was caused by vincible ignorance.

    Charter? See my comment above re Common Sense. A few years ago my brother’s father in law, a loyal Catholic, summed it up admirably: “What were they thinking about?”

    Now there appears to be at least one suit based on allegations of impropriety during the several month failure-to-report delay. If successful, a suit based on negligence such as this will be exceedingly expensive.

    They’ve almost all been matters of negligence–and all the subsequent settlements have been expensive. Almost 30 years ago the Archdiocese of New Orleans had to foot the bill for a Mississippi diocese.

    All of these scandals are part of your Hermeneutic of Mission.

  56. robtbrown says:

    Now there appears to be at least one suit based on allegations of impropriety during the several month failure-to-report delay. If successful, a suit based on negligence such as this will be exceedingly expensive.

    They’ve almost all been matters of negligence–and all the subsequent settlements have been expensive. Almost 30 years ago the Archdiocese of New Orleans had to foot the bill for a Mississippi diocese.

    All of these scandals are part of your Hermeneutic of Mission.

  57. irishgirl says:

    Congratulations to the new Bishop in Lincoln, Nebraska!
    I hope that he will be as good and supportive to the FSSP seminary and the traditional Carmel there!
    And a blessed retirement to the ‘Lion of Lincoln’, Bishop Bruskewitz!
    I also hope that Bishop Conley will keep the ‘no altar girls’ rule, too! Lincoln was the only diocese in the whole country not to have altar girls.

  58. frjim4321 says:

    All of these scandals are part of your Hermeneutic of Mission. rb

    I guess that would be the case if the vast majority of perpetrators were/are moderates and progressives, but as we’ve seen traditionals have been well represented, so I doubt your statement’s veracity.

  59. Shellynna says:

    San Diego’s new coadjutor, Bishop Cirilo Flores, told the story of how he kept being told by people he knew that he wouldn’t be staying in Orange as auxiliary. People kept saying there were border dioceses like Las Cruces and El Paso that were vacant. So he was somewhat expecting the call from the papal nuncio. The shock for him was that the appointment was to *San Diego.*

    I mention this because of the comments about Las Cruces and southern Arizona. My guess is that there are a couple of factors at work: One, there are larger dioceses that need filled first; and, two, one of the Holy Father’s strategies seems to be in sending dioceses their hometown guys. Aquila was ordained for Denver. Chaput spent a number of his early years in religious life in western Pennsylvania. San Diego’s own Bishop Flores was born in an area that was at that time in the Diocese of San Diego (Corona is now in the Diocese of Riverside). Even Cordileone has deep ties to San Francisco.

    My guess is that the Holy Father is more concerned about giving dioceses one of their own as those men mature to the ability to handle the appointment than he is with quickly filling empty chairs.

  60. AA Cunningham says:

    Father Z, regarding your comment:

    [NB: Since 14 Sept 2007, the primary responsibility of implementing the Motu Proprio’s provisions rests with parish priests rather than the local ordinary. That doesn’t mean that diocesan bishops do not also implement the provisions, but part of the purpose of the Motu Proprio was to relieve diocesan bishops of that seemingly odious burden.]

    While that is true in theory, the local ordinary can either make the implementation easy or difficult, explicitly or implicitly. Archbishop Chaput has made it no secret that he is not a fan of Latin, one could say he tolerates it, but in Denver it was made quite clear to the parish Pastors, outside of public view, that he preferred that the celebration of the TLM, other than at Our Lady of Mount Carmel, was something he would rather not see. I base that conclusion on conversations I’ve had with those who worked directly with the Archbishop in the chancery as well as in many parishes. Also there’s the following from a 19 July 2011 interview Archbishop Chaput did with John Allen of the fishwrap:

    Exclusive interview with Archbishop Charles Chaput

    “As an example, I certainly want to be faithful to the Holy Father and his teaching about the traditional expression of the Roman liturgy in the Tridentine form. I supported that and will continue to support that. It isn’t, however, my personal interest or direction.” (emphasis added)

    Let’s start with one you already raised: the Latin Mass.

    “The Latin Mass is deeply loved by some members of the church. The Holy Father, beginning with John Paul II and continued by Benedict XVI, has asked the bishops to be very sensitive to their needs. I was ordained in Rapid City in 1988, around the time that the Holy Father set up the Ecclesia Dei commission. As soon as I became aware of his desire, I welcomed the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter to Rapid City to establish a community to meet the needs of those people. There were three or four St. Pius X [break-away] communities in the diocese, but by the time I left they had all disappeared because we met their needs. In Denver, we have a full parish served by the Fraternity of St. Peter, and we have two other places where the priest, at least on occasion if not weekly, celebrates the Tridentine form of the liturgy. (emphasis added)

    I’m very happy to follow the lead of the Holy Father on all of this, because he has insights that I don’t have. He also has an inspiration from the Holy Spirit which I don’t have.”

    Having said that, I have a great deal of respect and admiration for Archbishop Chaput. He was a great improvement over his two predecessors in Denver and is responsible for bringing many lapsed Catholics here back to the faith. I had the priviledge of seeing and speaking with him, albeit briefly, on nearly a weekly basis during the final two years of his tenure in Denver. However, it is no secret that he is not big on rubrics; investigate the changes that have taken place in Denver since his departure, pomp, ceremony and tradition. Those are facts that he readily admits.

  61. southIndia says:

    @discipulus, my brother, I beg to make a fraternal correction to your post. it is not becoming of a catholic to speak of the next conclave and a future pope when the current Pope, the Vicar of Christ Our Lord, is reigning gloriously. Besides, we do not talk about the last days of our (Holy) Father.
    May the Lord give long days to His faithful servant, Benedict XIV !
    May He make him strong and victorious against his enemies !!

  62. amsjj1002 says:

    Extra prayers to both of these good bishops!

  63. discipulus says:

    @southIndia
    I did not suggest that Bp. Bruskewitz be created Cardinal to participate in a conclave, just that he would be eligible to do so before Sep. 6, 2015. I suggest that His Excellency be elevated because of his outstanding service to the Church.

    BTW, I noticed that you wrote Benedict XIV. It should be “May the Lord give lone days to his faithful servant, Benedict XVI”. I most certainly hope and pray that our Holy Father will reign for many more years to come.

  64. robtbrown says:

    frjim4321 says:

    All of these scandals are part of your Hermeneutic of Mission. rb

    I guess that would be the case if the vast majority of perpetrators were/are moderates and progressives, but as we’ve seen traditionals have been well represented, so I doubt your statement’s veracity.

    I never said that it was just liberals who were involved in the scandals. I said it was poor formation that produced priests not well formed psychologically, i.e. to be celibate. IMHO, this poor formation was a consequence of your hermeneutic of mission, which injected so much faux community into formation and produced men who were lonely once they began to live alone (or nearly alone).