POLL: Foot-washing on Holy Thursday where you are – ORDINARY FORM

Quick polls

The 2019 Holy Thursday ORDINARY Form Mass I attended ...

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

 

Some sharing options...

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in Liturgy Science Theatre 3000 and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to POLL: Foot-washing on Holy Thursday where you are – ORDINARY FORM

  1. bobbird says:

    In our parish, only females were chosen and there were only six. If only males were chosen, I am sure someone would have complained. The parish is so conditioned by now that no one complains about this. And, as an extra added attraction, we had a fine, large Protestantesque wooden cross for the Adoration on Good Friday. We have a Crucifix available only 40 days a year in our parish, replaced by a “Resurrected Christ” which does not even show His wounds.

  2. G1j says:

    Our priest had to beg/threaten the congregation because only a few of us got up after the homily. He took what he could get. Sad state of affairs these days. He threatened that the Mass would not proceed until twelve came forth.

  3. Catingub says:

    I’ve been one of the men chosen for the foot-washing for the last few years; this year was my third. The KofC organise it so that it’s only men and our Grand Knight will text us for volunteers the day before/of. One year they couldn’t find enough men but Father was adamant in replacing women who had volunteered themselves and we had 12 men.

    As far as I remember, it’s always been men. Our parish used to actually have them dress up in Middle Eastern garb for it. This was in the late ’90s/early ’00s, but it was impressionable on me as a kid.

  4. cbmiamiensis says:

    When the motu proprio was issued the Archbishop chose to include women in the mandatum ceremony here in The Cathedral. However we only choose a total of 8 people so as to avoid the “apostolic 12”. In my humble opinion 12 represents the apostolic college which is male. We might go with 7 (the “perfect” number) next year and space them out in a different configuration than previously. Having said all that I’m pretty sure that I’m the only one who notices the number and the symbolic significance of 12, 8 or 7!

  5. bibi1003 says:

    How should the foot-washing rite be done according to tradition? In yrecent years past, only our priests and deacons participated.

  6. capchoirgirl says:

    We always have all men. It’s the members of the Dominican community (other than the celebrant, of course), and then altar boys/men from the congregation who have been pre-selected to fill up the rest. This year we had the two oldest altar boys (yes, it’s all altar boys at our parish), and then three laymen.

  7. bobbird says:

    And I must add, especially to those whose parish priest insisted that the Mass would not proceed until volunteers came forth: if that happened to me, I would stand up and say, “Father, I would be glad to volunteer, but I will not be a participant to feminist sensibilities if women are among the group. The 12 Apostles were all MEN. I will not pander to the emasculating culture we are in within our Sacred Liturgy.”

  8. cdruiz says:

    Our pastor washed the feet of our twelve oldest altar boys, all in cassock and surplice. This was the third year in a row that he has done this, and it is so beautiful and the positive feedback so great, that it looks like it will continue into perpetuity. Sainte Marie’s in Manchester, NH does the Triduum (and every 9:30 a.m. Sunday Mass) in the Ordinary Form in an Extraordinary fashion.

  9. Jerome Charles says:

    bobbird, I have an opposing view. Our church chooses only men, and I don’t stand up and make a scene, but I do step outside for that part of the Mass. I will not pander to the misogynistic culture we are in within our Sacred Liturgy. [This isn’t April 1st, is it?]

    I think the ritual is far more powerful when women, men, and children/teens participate, as a concrete reminder that Jesus’ mandate to love and serve others is for all Christians, not just males, priests, or priest stand-ins. [The ritual might be more sentimental, but it isn’t more powerful, much less “far more” powerful. You’re understanding of what this rite is about has been derailed by years of misinformation.]

  10. eamonob says:

    I attended the Tridentine Mass, but it was the 1962 Missal, so foot washing was included. Only men chosen, obviously.