A breakthrough!

I think I am finally beginning to understand the LCWR and the Fishwrap.  I want you to understand them too.  Here’s a helpful video.

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14 Responses to A breakthrough!

  1. Mike says:

    It must work in homiletics, too. The celebrant treated us to an alarmingly speculative digression on namaste from the pulpit some months ago at a Mass I attended in a Novus Ordo parish away from home.

  2. ChesterFrank says:

    Yes,I too can relate. So much truth was spoken here. Namaste, and may the force be with you.

  3. pelerin says:

    I am presuming this is a spoof video although these days one can never be sure. Love the flowers inserted into his headband – perhaps they are his antennae!

  4. Tantum Ergo says:

    I use copious amounts of tinfoil for my helmet to protect me from “rigid” thoughts. Will that block out the white light and celestial vibes too?
    Enquiring minds want to know.

  5. chadmyers says:

    “nah-may-st” haha that’s the best part

  6. Harris says:

    Now I understand the “n0-mass-tay-hers” in the pews…

  7. HyacinthClare says:

    I am excruciatingly not-with-it (perfectly obvious to anyone). I never heard of “namaste” and this video is embarrassing. But Tantum Ergo (12:48) made it all OK (LOL)…

  8. Supertradmum says:

    This, imho, is the attitude of those who insist on following false seers and are, really, modern day Gnostics. My short-hand reality check for true spirituality in a person is this-“Are you in complete obedience to the Teaching Magisterium of the Church?” Basta. This is a great video!

  9. NBW says:

    Good stuff! LCWR is doing copious amounts of yoga. He forgot to include a labyrinth.

  10. Johnno says:

    ‘Namaste’ pronounced ‘Naa Mass Tay’ comes from India. A Hindu and traditional greeting, acknowledging the divine aspect of God in other people. A very polite and religious form of saying ‘hello.’

    Traditionally, during the sign of peace at Mass, instead of shaking hands, Indian Catholics typically make the same ‘namaste’ greeting gesture (Hands folded as in prayer and bowing saying “peace be with you”).

    I to this day prefer this method over shaking hands. When we receive Christ’s Body and Blood, we ourselves all become like Tabernacles. So during the sign of peace I feel I acknowledge what the person beside me is about to become when they receive God worthily. It feels more reverent in action, acknowledging the other person made in the image of God, and in my mind indicates a ‘peace’ to be granted to the person that is more than just the absence of war or external strife, but that interior peace.

    Adopting this method for the sign of peace is better imo than the hand-shaking V-peace sign throwing blowing kisses farce that the sign of peace often becomes at Mass.

    Anyway, just my thoughts…

  11. pelerin says:

    NBW mentions the labyrinth. The one in Chartres Cathedral in France is still there though I understand others were destroyed over the years as being un-Christian. Each Friday the chairs are moved away and the labyrinth is exposed. I was there in September and watched in astonishment as people of all ages walked slowly round and round with their heads down like zombies.

    I seem to remember reading somewhere that walking the labyrinth was originally done by those who could not afford going on pilgrimage to the Holy Land so perhaps it was of Christian origin after all. However what struck me was that there were quite a number of people walking the labyrinth and yet when I visited the chapel of the Blessed Sacrament there I was alone the whole time – nobody else stopped by.

    And I had never heard of namaste either! And having read the explanation by Johnno would also welcome this at Mass instead of a handshake which fills me with dread as the time approaches.

  12. yatzer says:

    I’d go for the namaste thing. Probably not going to happen. I grit my teeth as I smile and try not to be rude.

  13. RJHighland says:

    We have a couple of priests in our dioceses that appear to be disciples of this guy.

  14. Michael_Thoma says:

    Johnno says:
    20 December 2014 at 1:51 pm
    ‘Namaste’ pronounced ‘Naa Mass Tay’ comes from India. A Hindu and traditional greeting, acknowledging the divine aspect of God in other people. A very polite and religious form of saying ‘hello.’

    Traditionally, during the sign of peace at Mass, instead of shaking hands, Indian Catholics typically make the same ‘namaste’ greeting gesture (Hands folded as in prayer and bowing saying “peace be with you”).

    Must be Indian Latin-Rite Catholics, Eastern Catholics don’t do this at all. Like our Eastern brethren in the Middle East, we place our hands into the hands of the person(s) we exchange peace with – usually to our immediate area – and afterward draw the sign of the cross (using the two-fingers pressed to the thumb) on ourselves. Also, we don’t say anything, the peace we receive from the priest, flows from the altar (the feet of God’s throne). Sometimes, the people sing a hymn about Shlomo (translated as ‘Let your peace and joy/bliss be with us’) if the crowd is very large, while peace is being exchanged.

    http://youtu.be/Gaz-SpxkKH8?t=13m8s