Plenary Indulgences 31 Dec and 1 Jan

Today, the last day of the year, you have an opportunity to obtain a plenary indulgence, under the usual conditions, by taking part in the recitation or singing of the Te Deum in a church or oratory.

Tomorrow, 1 January, you can obtain a plenary indulgence by taking part in the singing or recitation of the Veni Creator Spiritus.

I recommend warmly that you review and excellent post by my friend Fr. Tim Finigan, the parish priest in marvelous Margate, about obtaining indulgences.  HERE

Tomorrow, we will sing the Veni Creator immediately after 9 a.m. Mass.

If there were ever a year in which we needed the help of the Holy Spirit, I sense that this upcoming year is it.

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10 Responses to Plenary Indulgences 31 Dec and 1 Jan

  1. Gregg the Obscure says:

    I’m curious about this. Were I to simply drop into a church today and recite the Te Deum, would that qualify? Or must the recitation include other folks too?

    Ditto for tomorrow after the Mass of Obligation, would my own sotto voce recitation of the Veni Creator qualify?

    Thanks and Happy New Year!

  2. The Masked Chicken says:

    I think public recitation or singing requires more than one person. By oneself, it is private recitation or singing and a partial indulgence is granted. Here is the citation:

    60. The Te Deum. PLENARY INDULGENCE when recited publicly on the last day of the year. Otherwise a partial indulgence is granted to those who recite the Te Deum in thanksgiving.

    The Chicken

  3. Pingback: Plenary Indulgences 31 Dec and 1 Jan | Fr. Z’s Blog | Deaconjohn1987's Blog

  4. Adam Welp says:

    Ok, looks like I need to add the Enchiridion Indulgentiarum to the list of books I need to have handy now that I am on my parish’s liturgical committee.

    I’m going to do what I can to right the ship liturgically at my parish, even if it kills me! Please pray for me as this is going to be an uphill battle!

  5. Imrahil says:

    Possibly – but this is merely a suggestion, no opinion – it might qualify for “publicness” if you are in Church, alone maybe, and recite it loudly. Though we always hesitate to do so. Sotto voce in no case, though.

  6. Tony Phillips says:

    Popped into SS Austin & Gregory’s today for the noon Mass; your friend Fr F sang the Te Deum afterwards. Over at St Ethelbert’s in Ramsgate, a visiting American Dominican said Mass using the Dominican usus antiquior, which was kind of cool.
    It’s nice that Thanet has become an EF hotspot; just a shame there’s no EF Masses closer to Canterbury.

  7. aviva meriam says:

    how would I know if a priest will chant either prayer?
    Is it required?

  8. Geoffrey says:

    “Ok, looks like I need to add the Enchiridion Indulgentiarum to the list of books I need to have handy now that I am on my parish’s liturgical committee.
    I’m going to do what I can to right the ship liturgically at my parish, even if it kills me! Please pray for me as this is going to be an uphill battle!”

    Good for you! I have always said that more of us need to become involved liturgically in the average parish if we want things to change. As I became more involved in my own parish, a wise priest told me “choose your battles”. Sage advice.

  9. majuscule says:

    Te Deum after vigil Mass.

    Father announced that he has the Archbishop’s permission to bless Epiphany Water!

  10. steveesq says:

    I really would have appreciated the opportunity for a plenary indulgence. But at the Mass today, there was no Veni Creator Spiritus, just a “Happy New Year”. In fact, the Solemnity of Mary, the Mother of God was briefly noted at the beginning, but we paid no homage to Her as a congregation except kind of with the poor hymns chosen. On the way home, my wife noted that we hadn’t even bothered to pray a “Hail Mary” with a bit of disdain, which my children agreed to. That was big personally because it’s usually me noting these things.

    Why can’t the Church just help us? Why wouldn’t the Church everywhere believe that all of us should know of and be able to take advantage of indulgences? Why should I have to know all of the Enchiridion? Why do I have to rely on priests from afar to tell me these important matters? Thanks, Father, but I only saw your post after the fact. I’ll try to remember this for next year and I’ll sing it by myself if I have to.