WDTPRS – 4th Gaudete Sunday of Advent: All the orations at once!

This Sunday’s nickname, “Gaudete” means “Rejoice!”  Gaudete, an imperative of gaudeo and the first word of the Introit chant, sets the theme in the Novus Ordo and the older, Traditional Mass: joy.  Advent is not strictly a penitential season the way Lent is.  Since Advent is about Lord’s Second Coming, not just His joyful First at Bethlehem, we also prepare through penance, joyful penance, or maybe penitential joy.  We sing Alleluia but not the Gloria.  During Advent flowers and ornaments are put aside and musical instruments are not to be used, except organ to sustain congregational singing… except for today, when the discipline is relaxed.  Gaudete parallels Laetare Sunday in Lent (which also means “Rejoice!”). Therefore, today is the only other Sunday we have rose (rosacea) colored vestments.

Let’s move along to our prayers.

COLLECT (1962MR):

Aurem tuam, quaesumus, Domine, precibus nostris accommoda:
et mentis nostrae tenebras, gratia tuae visitationis illustra.

The multi-volume Corpus orationum says this prayer was, with variations, in numerous ancient manuscripts.  The mickle Lewis & Short Dictionary says accommodo means “to fit or adapt one thing to another, to lay, put, or hang on”.  In English “accommodations” are a place suited to our living needs.  An “accommodating” person adjusts his world to suit our exigencies.  In relation to property accommodo means: “to lend it to one for use”.  In Classical Latin it is found, as in today’s prayer, with “ears”.  Think of Marc Antony crying out in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (III,ii) , “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears”.  Mens means “the conscience” as well as “a plan, purpose, design, intention”.  Mens points to our heart, mind and soul.

LITERAL VERSION:

O Lord, lend your ear to our prayers, we beseech you, and by the grace of your visitation, illuminate the shadows of our mind.

God is infinite.  Yet it is possible for us to call on a loving God to condescend and adapt to our needs.  Our prayers, which our own for our benefit, are intricately bound with God’s eternal self-knowledge, plan and providence.  In the case of God “hearing” us, He knows what we want better than we know it ourselves.  Consider also that the eternal Word, uttered from before time, is in our prayers and good words and deeds, echoing back to the Father.  If we are images of God, especially in our mens, God should be able to hear and recognize Himself in us.  Our neighbor should look at us and hear us and see God reflected.

A second image in the prayer is from the contrast of illumination and darkness.  Christ, the light to our darkness, moral and intellectual, is coming.  With grace He adapts our minds and hearts to receive what is necessary for salvation.  He adapts to us, in His incarnation.  He adapts us to Him by grace.

SECRET (1962MR):

Devotionis nostrae tibi, quaesumus, Domine, hostia iugiter immoletur: quae et sacri peragat instituta mysterii, et salutare tuum in nobis mirabiliter operetur.

This prayer is in the ancient Gelasian among Advent prayers and in the Veronese Sacramentary during September for the “fast of the seventh month” (Latin septem “seven”).  It survived the post-Conciliar reform, and is in the Novus Ordo with potenter for the older mirabiliter.

Iugiter is an interesting adverb.   A iugum is a “yoke”, which harnesses oxen to a plow.  The iugum was the symbol of defeat.  Romans would force the vanquished to pass underneath to symbolize that they had been subjugated.  Our present iugiter means “always” or “continuously”, since by it actions are “yoked” together, one after another.

Immolo means “to sprinkle a victim with sacrificial meal” (as in grain) and also “to bring as an offering, to offer, sacrifice, immolate.”  Perago means essentially, “to pass through” and is construed as “to thrust through, pierce through, transfix” and hence “to slay.”  Also it means “to carry through, go through with, execute, finish, accomplish, complete.”  The Latin liturgical dictionary Blaise/Dumas says perago suggests continuous action.  Operor is “to work, have effect, be effectual, to be active, to operate.”

LITERAL TRANSLATION:

We now beg, O Lord, let there be offered up to You continuously the sacrificial victim of our devotion, which may both carry through the actions of the sacred mystery that was instituted, and wondrously effect for us Your salvation.

Do not forget this, O Catholic reader.  What does “wondrously effect for us Your salvation” really mean, if we do not as a consequence embody that effect, echo these words and sacred actions in our daily lives and works of mercy?  The Communion Antiphon drives this home.  This Sunday we hear Isaiah 35:4: “Dicite pusillanimes: confortamini et nolite timere…  Say to those who are of a fearful heart, ‘Be strong, fear not! Behold, your God will come with vengeance, with the recompense of God. He will come and save you.’”

This is meant not for us to hear and rejoice in, but also to hear and act upon.

We will all be called to account for how we treated the Lord’s gifts, how we shared them … or not.  Will you participate and Mass and then not attend to the salvation of others?  St. Basil “the Great” of Caesarea (+379), preaching about the obligation of Advent almsgiving said:

“The command is clear: the hungry person is dying now, the naked person is freezing now, the person in debt is beaten now – and you want to wait until tomorrow?”

After the Antiphon the priest intones today’s.

POSTCOMMUNIO (1962MR):

Imploramus, Domine, clementiam tuam: ut haec divina subsidia, a vitiis expiatos, ad festa ventura nos praeparent.

Again this is from the Gelasian Sacramentary.  It is also in the Novus Ordo, but rearranged with a slight change to improve the rhythm: “Tuam, Domine, clementiam imploramus…”.  It is also nice to start with God (Tuam) rather than with us (imploramus).
L&S indicates that clementia, is “a calm, tranquil state” and, “indulgent, forbearing conduct towards the errors and faults of others, mercy.”  It is a form of address, “Clementia Tua…Your Clemency”, like “Your Majesty”.  Subsidium means “the troops stationed in reserve in the third line of battle (behind the principes)” and thus “support, assistance, aid, help, protection”.   A vitium is “a fault, defect, blemish” and consequently, “a moral fault, failing, error, offence, crime, vice”.  Expio means “to make satisfaction, amends, atonement for a crime or a criminal; to purify any thing defiled with crime; to atone for, to expiate, purge by sacrifice.”

LITERAL TRANSLATION:

We implore Your mercy, O Lord, that these divine supports may prepare us, purified from our faults, for the coming feast days.

During Holy Mass today we anticipate the joy of Christmas with flowers, instrumental music, and rosacea vestments.  At the end, however, comes a stark prayer, spare, a reminder our sins.  We hear military language (subsidia). We are soldiers engaged in spiritual warfare.  In the Latin Rite, Holy Mass ends abruptly.  Seconds after this the priest will literally order us to get out, to go back into the world to our work: “Ite! missa est…  Go!  Mass is over!”, and bless us for our tasks. There must be continuity between the reception of Communion and our daily lives.

Today’s prayers, in both the Traditional Missale Romanum and in the Novus Ordo, speak to us from our ancient Roman Catholic origins.  And they continue them.   Is that not what the traditionally minded Catholic desires?  As a result, desire for these prayers, putting so much stock in them, demands a response according to the heart and mind of the prayers.

When these prayers were first uttered in the Roman liturgy, during Advent, Christians denied themselves in fasting in order to share more generously with the poor.  St. Leo I “the Great” (+461) was Pope when these prayers were probably coming into use.  Leo’s thought must help us understand what these prayers really say.

What did Leo think of Advent?   Hear him now in a sermon on the Advent fast:

“What can be more salutary for us than fasting, by the practice of which we draw nearer to God, and, standing fast against the devil, defeat the vices that lead us astray.  For fasting was ever the food of virtue.  From abstinence there arise chaste thoughts, just decisions, salutary counsels.  Through voluntary suffering the flesh dies to concupiscences, the spirit waxes strong in virtue.  But as the salvation of our souls is not gained solely by fasting, let us fill up what is wanting in our fasting with almsgiving to the poor.  Let us give to virtue what we take from pleasure.  Let abstinence of those who fast be the dinner of the poor.

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ADVENTCAzT 14: Conversion

Here is ADVENTCAzT 14, for Saturday of the 2nd Week of Advent.

These 5 minute offerings, to help you prepare for the upcoming feast as well as for your own, personal, meeting with the Lord, are a token of gratitude for my benefactors who donate and send items from my wishlist.  Thank you!

Make some Mystic Monk Coffee and have a listen!

Some serious Advent music : US HERE – UK HERE

Please chime in if you listened.  I read and need the feedback.

PS: These podcasts should also be available through my iTunes feed, though in years past I have had problems with it. Let me know how you are listening.  Through the plug in on this post? Through iTunes? Downloading?

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St. Juan Diego’s amazing miracle story

St. Juan Diego

Remember…

If we do not believe in miracles, we do not ask for them. If we do not ask for them, they will not be granted.

We are not alone: the Church Militant and the Church Triumphant are closely knit, interwoven in charity. We on earth must intercede for each other and believe and ask for the intercession of the saints.

Today is the Feast of St. Juan Diego, of Our Lady of Guadalupe fame.  Mexican, native-American St. Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin (+1548), was granted an apparition by Our Lady Virgin Mary four times on the hill of Tepeyac.   He had been declared Venerable in 1987.  St. John Paul II decided to beatify him without the approved miracle.  He was beatified on 6 May 1990.

Under normal circumstances, for a beatification there must be a miracle which has been rigorously studied and approved by the Congregation for Causes and Saints accepted by the Holy Father.   St. John Paul bypassed the process.  Pope Benedict and Pope Francis have done the same occasionally… well… Francis pretty often, as it turns out.

There was a miracle for Juan Diego’s canonization, however.  It is quite a story.

Juan Jose Barragan Silva, of Mexico City, was a drug addict from his adolescence.  He and his mother had been abandoned by his father.

On 3 May 1990 – note the date – Juan Jose, after getting drunk and high on marijuana with a friend, went home and started to cut himself on the head with a knife.  His mother, Esperanza, tried to get the knife away but failed.  She implored him to stop abusing himself and give up the alcohol and marijuana.   He shouted that he didn’t want to live any more so loudly that the neighbors came to see what was going on, but the door was locked.

Juan Jose threw himself off the balcony of their second floor apartment (in the USA this would be counted as the third floor).

In that moment, Esperanza had a “flash”.  Knowing that Pope John Paul was to be in Mexico for the beatification of Juan Diego, she called on Juan Diego to intercede for her son.

Juan Jose fell about 10 meters and landed close to a friend of his, Jesus Alfredo Velasquez Ramirez, who saw him land on his head on the concrete pavement.  Juan Jose was bleeding copiously from the mouth, nose and ears.  They covered him, thinking he was dead.  He suddenly sat up, rose and went to the stairs leading to his apartment.  On meeting his mother coming down the stairs he asked his mother’s forgiveness.  They embraced and remained that way for another ten minutes or so before the ambulance came.

During the ambulance ride Juan Jose said he had lost his vision.  He was able to say a Our Father.  He was registered at Sanatorio Durango at 1830.

The medical prognosis was very pessimistic.

The doctor, Juan Homero Hernandez Illescas, later explained that it was already incomprehensible that he was still alive.

They did tests immediately and found that Juan Jose had a fracture of the epistropheus, a large hemotoma in the right temporal-parietal region extending to the lateral part of the neck and lacerations of the muscles about the parapharyngeal space,  fractures from the right orbital to the clivus, intracranial hemorrhages and air in the cranial cavity and in the cerebral ventricals.

Fr. Manuel Ponce gave him the last rites under the impression that Juan Jose would soon be dead.

He continued to live.

Fore the first few days Juan Jose was sedated. On the fifth, doctors found that his pupils were symmetrical and reactive and that he could move his arms and legs.  On the sixth day he was released from the ICU to a regular ward.  On the seventh day his feeding tube was removed.  He was released on the tenth day after the fall.   Subsequent tests by neurologists and other specialists showed a total recovery.  Juan Jose subsequently gave up his drug habit and started school.

It was determined that his change of condition came on 6 May at the very time John Paul II beatified Juan Diego.

For a miracle of curing to be authenticated as such, the cure has to be sudden, complete and lasting.  It has to be inexplicable by science. It has to be demonstrated that the venerable or blessed was invoked in a particular way.  There are usually spiritual effects, such as conversion of life of the person cured and also witnesses.

The decree concerning this miracle was promulgated on 20 December 2001.  Holy Father Pope John Paul II canonized St. Juan Diego on 31 July 2002.

 

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A must read Open Letter to Pope Francis about Amoris Laetitia

I wrote about this in another post here today. Upon reflection I’m posting about it again to make sure that more people will see it.

[…]

Third, this is an examination of erroneous claims some are making on the basis of Amoris laetitia ch. 8.  First Things has a summary of an Open Letter To Pope Francis by John Finnis (emeritus professor of law and legal philosophy at the University of Oxford and Biolchini Family Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame) and Germain Grisez (emeritus professor of Christian ethics at Mount St. Mary’s University).  It is, quite simply, brilliant.  HERE  This piece includes a link (a little hard to see) to the Letter itself, which is longer and not easy.  HERE

Friends, this is important.

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WDTPRS – 3rd Sunday of Advent: The childlike dash towards the long-desired thing

Our new rose set for Sung Masses on Gaudete and Laetare when we have an Asperges.  DONATE

We are coming to the 3rd Sunday of Advent, also nicknamed Gaudete…. the plural imperative of gaudeo, “Rejoice!”, the first word of the Introit chant.  This Sunday there is a relaxation of the penitential aspect of Advent, just Laetare Sunday does during Lent.

Yes, Advent is a penitential time, though not so much as Lent.  Advent is a time for joyful penance or penitential joy.

Remember: Real priests wear rosacea.

In the first week of Advent we begged God for the grace of the proper approach and will for our preparation.

In the second week, we ask God for help and protection in facing the obstacles the world raises against us. This Sunday we have a glimpse of the joy that is coming in our rose colored (rosacea) vestments, some use of the organ, flowers. Christmas is ever nearer at hand.

COLLECT – (2002MR)

Deus, qui conspicis populum tuum nativitatis dominicae festivitatem fideliter exspectare, praesta, quaesumus, ut valeamus ad tantae salutis gaudia pervenire, et ea votis sollemnibus alacri laetitia celebrare.

The infinitives in our Collect (expectare… pervenire… celebrare) give it a grand sound and also sum up what we are doing in Advent. L&S informs us that conspicio means, “to look at attentively, to get sight of, to descry, perceive, observe.” Alacer is, “lively, brisk, quick, eager, active; glad, happy, cheerful” and it is put in an unlikely combination with laetitia, “joy, especially unrestrained joyfulness”.

At the same time we also have votis sollemnibus. Votum signifies first of all, “a solemn promise made to some deity” (we have all made baptismal vows!) and also “wish, desire, longing, prayer”.

There is a powerful sentiment of longing in this prayer, God’s as well as ours.

Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that expecto is from ex- + pecto (pecto, “to comb”). Exspecto is “look forward to, await, long for, dread” in your L&S.  You can also comb through your copy of the etymological dictionary of Latin by Ernout and Meillet which says it is from ex– + *specio, spexi, spectum or ex- + spicio. Therefore, it is a cousin of conspicio: God “watches” over us and we “look” back at… er um… forward to Him. This word play is clever.

Furthermore, sollemnis, related to sollus, i.e. “totus-annus“, points to something that takes place every year.  So, it basically means “yearly, annual”.  Thus, by extension it means something that takes place at appointed times, such as rites of a religious character and that which is does by custom.

LITERAL TRANSLATION:

O God, who attentively watch Your people look forward faithfully to the feast of the Lord’s birth, grant, we entreat, that we may be able to attain the to joys of so great a salvation and celebrate them with eager jubilation in solemn annual festive rites.

OBSOLETE ICEL (1973):

Lord God, may we, your people, who look forward to the birthday of Christ experience the joy of salvation and celebrate that feast with love and thanksgiving.

You decide.

Rose vestments from the days of Fr. Finigan in Blackfen. Then came the regime change….

With the last two week’s of “rushing” in our prayers and doing good works, we have now the added image of eager and unrestrained joy, an almost childlike dash towards a long-desired thing.

Have earthly fathers watched this scene all of a Christmas morning?

Even so should we be in our eager joy to perform good works under the gaze of a Father who watches us, a Father with a plan.

The obsolete ICEL version captures little of the impact of the Latin prayer, that is, God the Father is patiently watching his people as we go about the Advent business of doing penance and just works in joyful anticipation Christ’s coming.

NEW CORRECTED ICEL (2011):
O God, who see how your people faithfully await the feast of the Lord’s Nativity, enable us, we pray, to attain the joys of so great a salvation, land to celebrate them always with solemn worship and glad rejoicing.

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And there was a great battle in heaven…

war_in_heavenThese days I get a lot of email asking me to explain what is going on in the Church today.  The question is often accompanied by heart-felt, often heart-rending words of personal pain.

What is going on the Church is is what has always gone on in the Church.

There is a spiritual war being waged by the forces of Hell against God.

The visible actors in this war are fallen human beings, suffering from the effects of original sin.  They are sinners, as all men are.  They are prone to the three perennial foes, the world, the flesh and the Devil.

The invisible antagonists are well known.  They are relentless, cunning, malicious beyond human imagination.  They have human agents; some are witting, but most are dupes who do evil thinking that what they do is good.

I point the readership to three pieces today.

First, read every word of Ed Pentin’s interview in Regina.  Samples:

REGINA: What reaction to the dubia do you see, on the ground in Rome, from your Vatican contacts?

Edward Pentin: The reaction has been interesting so far: almost all the College of Cardinals and the Roman Curia have remained silent, neither supporting the cardinals, nor, more importantly, coming out in support of the Pope and his decision not to respond. If silence is taken to mean consent for the dubia, then one could therefore argue that the vast majority are in favor of the four cardinals. That can only be speculative of course, but it could conceivably be true as for months one has heard from one significant part of the Curia that they feel great unease about what is happening. The phrases “reign of terror” and “Vatican martial law” are frequently bandied around.

REGINA: ‘Reign of terror’. Wow.

Edward Pentin: Not an insignificant number of officials are opposed to what the Pope is doing, but are keeping quiet having convinced themselves there is nothing they can do and instead are preferring to “save their ammunition” until the next conclave. It should be said that that was before the dubia were published, so things might have changed, but I think if the Pope continues not to respond and demand persists for an answer, a growing number of the College will move towards favoring the four cardinals, and probably publicly so. We are then likely to see a fairly rapid unraveling of this pontificate towards an unknown conclusion.

It must be said that another part of the Curia and the College exists which is fully on board with the Pope’s agenda and certainly, until now, they have been in the ascendant. There are, therefore, two parallel curias: one fully behind the Pope or ambivalent towards him, and the other who find his pontificate deeply regrettable and which they hope will soon end. It’s not a situation that augurs well, whichever way one looks at it.

[…]

REGINA: The Pope’s comments on ‘rigid’ young Catholics. What’s that all about?

Edward Pentin:  The common view in Rome is that his ‘rigid’ comments are simply aimed at wearing down so-called “conservative” or traditional Catholics so that orthodoxy gradually disappears, and he can push through his reforms. That’s not necessarily the case, of course, but that is how it is being perceived in some quarters. Of particular concern to some has been the Pope comments in this regard which he has made in reference to seminaries as they see it is as plot to weaken orthodox priests from the start, especially in the area of conscience and sexual morality. It’s just one of many other acts made during this pontificate which has led to the disaffection of a large number of practicing Catholics. But it seems that seminarians, especially in the UK and US, tend to understand what’s happening in today’s Vatican and are trying to uphold the Church’s teachings and Tradition. And in trying to make sense of it all, they see it in a positive sense: of clarifying and uncovering what has long been seen as a veiled schism that’s existed at least since the end of the Second Vatican Council.

Second, if you are still up to it, now read the Holy Father’s daily fervorino posted today.

Third, this is an examination of erroneous claims some are making on the basis of Amoris laetitia ch. 8.  First Things has a summary of an Open Letter To Pope Francis by John Finnis (emeritus professor of law and legal philosophy at the University of Oxford and Biolchini Family Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame) and Germain Grisez (emeritus professor of Christian ethics at Mount St. Mary’s University).  It is, quite simply, brilliant.  HERE  This piece includes a link (a little hard to see) to the Letter itself, which is longer and not easy.  HERE

The following is addressed mostly to priests… I think.  I still offer to some people that, although what is going on at certain levels of the Church truly affects everyone, not everyone should constantly scour the internet looking for the latest.  That could verge into the spiritual danger of curiositas.  Some people should tune out a bit for the sake of their vocations.

However, some of us need to be tuned in.  For these I have the following.

A war is underway.

The middle ground is being eaten up.

Sides are being more clearly chosen and drawn.

We cannot remain in the middle ground, neutral, as if none of this concerns us.

It concerns us all.

Hence, I ask all of you to pray and to fast.  For the good of the Church and her members.

Now.  Pray now!

O my God, I firmly believe that Thou art one God in Three Divine Persons, Father, Son and Holy Ghost. I believe that Thy Divine Son became Man, and died for our sins, and that He will come to judge the living and the dead. I believe these and all the truths which the Holy Catholic Church teaches, because Thou hast revealed them, Who canst neither deceive nor be deceived.

Saint Michael Archangel, defend us in battle, be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil; may God rebuke him, we humbly pray; and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thy intercession, was left unaided. Inspired by this confidence, I fly unto thee, O Virgin of virgins, my Mother. To thee do I come, before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions,but in they mercy, hear and answer me. Amen.

Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

Today, start fasting.

Consider other mortifications for the sake of reparation for sins.

The combox is CLOSED.

Posted in ¡Hagan lío!, "How To..." - Practical Notes, Cri de Coeur, Our Catholic Identity, Pò sì jiù, Pray For A Miracle, PRAYER REQUEST, Self-absorbed Promethean Neopelagians, SUMMORUM PONTIFICUM, The Coming Storm, The future and our choices, Turn Towards The Lord, Urgent Prayer Requests, Wherein Fr. Z Rants | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

ADVENTCAzT 13: Regem venturum Dominum * Venite adoremus.

Here is ADVENTCAzT 13, for Friday of the 2nd Week of Advent.

Today features a something priests have recited daily for a looooong time.

Today also has a quote from Fulton Sheen.  A commentator tells us that today is the anniversary of his death in 1979.

These 5 minute offerings, to help you prepare for the upcoming feast as well as for your own, personal, meeting with the Lord, are a token of gratitude for my benefactors who donate and send items from my wishlist.  Thank you!

Make some Mystic Monk Coffee and have a listen!

Some serious Advent music : US HERE – UK HERE

Please chime in if you listened.  I read and need the feedback.

PS: These podcasts should also be available through my iTunes feed, though in years past I have had problems with it. Let me know how you are listening.  Through the plug in on this post? Through iTunes? Downloading?

FULTON SHEEN sm

Posted in ADVENTCAzT, ADVENTCAzT, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, PODCAzT | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Blind woman healed by contact with relics and priestly prayers

This is a great story.

When I wrote about St. Gianna, I offered some points about miracles.

I hereby put to you several points to consider, any of which might serve as a starting point for comments below:

  1. Saints are presented to us by Holy Mother Church for “the two I’s”: imitation and intercession.
  2. As all Christians are called to imitate Christ, we also must experience self-emptying and the Cross, abandonment to providence and self-donation. We must be willing to lose everything.
  3. We are not alone: the Church Militant and the Church Triumphant are closely knit, interwoven in charity. We on earth must intercede for each other and believe and ask for the intercession of the saints.
  4. God makes use of the weak to demonstrate His might and love.
  5. If we do not believe in miracles, we do not ask for them. If we do not ask for them, they will not be granted.
  6. Our life of faith is noticed by non-believers and they are not unaffected.
  7. What a difference a bishop (and a priest) can make!
  8. How often do you invoke the help of the saints and holy angels?
  9. God’s ways are not our ways.
  10. No one is too small to be an occasion of grace for others.
Posted in Just Too Cool, Saints: Stories & Symbols | Tagged , | 9 Comments

Hail, thou holy Throne of God

15_11_30_rubens_immaculate-conception_200From the 3rd Nocturn of Matins:

V. Grant, Lord, a blessing.
Benediction. May the Gospel’s holy lection be our safety and protection. Amen.

Reading 7
From the Holy Gospel according to Luke
Luke 1:26-28
In that time, the angel Gabriel was sent from God into a city of Galilee, called Nazareth, to a virgin espoused to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David; and the virgin’s name was Mary. And so on.

Homily by St. Germain, Patriarch of Constantinople.
On the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin.
Hail, Mary, full of grace, holier than the Saints, higher than the heavens, more glorious than the Cherubim, more honourable than the Seraphim, and the most worshipful thing that the hands of God have made. Hail, O dove, bearing in thy beak the olive-branch of peace that telleth us of salvation from the spiritual flood, Gen. viii. 10, n, dove, blessed omen of a safe harbour, whose wings are of silver, and thy feathers of gold, shining in the bright beams of the Most Holy and Light-giving Spirit. Ps. lxvii. 14. Hail, thou living garden of Eden, planted towards the East by the right hand of the Most Merciful and Mighty God, wherein do grow to His glory rich lilies and unfading roses, for the healing of them that have drunk in death from the blighting and pestilential breezes of the bitter West, Gen. ii. 8, 9; Eden, wherein hath sprung that Tree of life, Whereof if any man eat he shall live for ever. Gen. ii. 9; iii. 22. John vi. 52. Hail, stately Palace of the King, most holy, stainless, purest, House of the Most High God, adorned with His Royal splendour, open to all, filled with Kingly dainties; Palace wherein is that spiritual bridal chamber, not made with hands, nor hung with divers colours, in the which the Eternal Word, when He would raise up fallen man, wedded flesh unto Himself, that He might reconcile unto the Father them who had cast themselves away.
V. But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

R. A garden enclosed is my sister, my spouse, a garden enclosed, a fountain sealed.
* O Mary, thy perfumes are a garden of delights.
V. Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled.
R. O Mary, thy perfumes are a garden of delights.

V. Grant, Lord, a blessing.
Benediction. She whose feast-day we are keeping, Mary, blessed Maid of Maidens, be our Advocate with God. Amen.

immaculate-conception ZurbaranReading 8
Hail, O rich and shady Mountain of God, whereon pastured the True Lamb, Who hath taken away our sins and infirmities, Hab. iii. 3; Isa. liii. 4; John i. 29, mountain, whereout hath been cut without hands that Stone which hath smitten the altars of the idols, and become the head-stone of the corner, marvellous in our eyes. Dan. ii. 34; Ps. cxvii. 22, 23. Hail, thou holy Throne of God, thou divinest store-house, thou temple of glory, thou bright crown, thou chosen treasure, thou mercy-seat for the whole world, thou heaven declaring the glory of God. Ps. xviii. 2. Hail, thou vessel of pure gold, made to hold the manna that came down from heaven, the sweet food of our souls, even Christ. Ex. xvi.33; Heb. ix. 4; John vi. 49-51. Hail, O purest Virgin, most praiseworthy and most worshipful, hallowed treasury for the wants of all creatures; thou art the untitled earth, the unploughed field; thou art the vine full of flowers, the well overflowing with waters, Maiden and Mother; thou art the Mother that knew not a man, the hidden treasure of guilelessness, and the clear, bright star of holiness; by thy most acceptable prayers, strong from thy motherly mouth, obtain for all estates of men in the Church that they may continually tend unto Him Who is the Lord, and God, and Maker of thee, and of them, and of all, but of thee the Son also, conceived without man’s intervention; obtain this, O Mother, pilot them to the harbour of peace.
V. But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

R. My soul doth magnify the Lord;
* For He That is mighty hath done to me great things, and holy is His name.
V. For, behold, from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed.
R. For He That is mighty hath done to me great things, and holy is His name.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. For He That is mighty hath done to me great things, and holy is His name.

V. Grant, Lord, a blessing.
Benediction. May He that is the Angels’ King to that high realm His people bring. Amen.

tiepolo prado immaculate conceptionReading 9
Be it thine to clothe God’s priests with righteousness, and to make them shout aloud for joy Ps. cxxxi. 9, 16, in approved and stainless, and upright and glorious faith. thine be it to guide in peace the sceptres of orthodox princes, even of princes who put their trust in thee to be the crown of their Majesty, and the Royal Robe of their greatness, and the firm foundation of their dominion, more than in purple, or fine gold, or pearls, or precious stones; thine be it to put under their feet the unfaithful nations, nations that blaspheme thee, and the God That was born of thee; thine be it to keep in meek obedience the people that are under them, according to the commandment of God. Behold, this is thine own city, which hath thee for her towers and her foundations, crown her with victory, gird the house of God with strength, keep undefiled the loveliness of His tabernacles, as for them that praise thy name, be thou their deliverer from strife and bitterness of spirit. Free thou the prisoner, protect the wanderer, and if there be any that hath no refuge, be thou to him a consolation. Stretch forth thine hand and help the whole earth so shall we year by year keep this and all thy feasts, and at last be found with thee in Christ Jesus, Who is Lord of all, and verily our God. To Him, with the Holy Father, Who is the Fountain of Life, and the coeternal Spirit, Three Persons and One Substance, even as there is one Kingdom, be glory and strength, now and for ever. Amen.
V. But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

Te Deum
We praise thee, O God, * we acknowledge thee to be the Lord.
All the earth doth worship thee, * the Father everlasting.
To thee all Angels cry aloud, * the Heavens, and all the Powers therein.
To thee Cherubim and Seraphim * continually do cry.

(bow head) Holy, Holy, Holy * Lord God of Sabaoth;

Heaven and earth are full * of the Majesty of thy glory.
The glorious company of the Apostles * praise thee.
The goodly fellowship of the Prophets * praise thee.
The noble army of Martyrs * praise thee.
The holy Church throughout all the world * doth acknowledge thee;
The Father, * of an infinite Majesty.
Thine honourable, true, * and only Son;
Also the Holy Ghost, * the Comforter.
Thou art the King of Glory, * O Christ.
Thou art the everlasting * Son of the Father.

Immaculate Conception Francisco Ignacio Ruiz de la IglesiaDuring the following verse all make a profound bow:
When thou tookest upon thee to deliver man, * thou didst not abhor the Virgin’s womb.

When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, * thou didst open the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers.
Thou sittest at the right hand of God, * in the glory of the Father.
We believe that thou shalt come * to be our Judge.

Kneel for the following verse
We therefore pray thee, help thy servants, * whom thou hast redeemed with thy precious Blood.

Make them to be numbered with thy Saints, * in glory everlasting.
O Lord, save thy people, * and bless thine heritage.
Govern them, * and lift them up for ever.
Day by day * we magnify thee;

During the following verse, by local custom, all make a profound bow.
And we worship thy Name * ever, world without end.

Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us * this day without sin.
O Lord, have mercy upon us, * have mercy upon us.
O Lord, let thy mercy lighten upon us, * as our trust is in thee.
O Lord, in thee have I trusted, * let me never be confounded.

Posted in Our Solitary Boast, Patristiblogging | Tagged | 1 Comment

Happy Birthday Blog!

On 8 December 2005, I posted this photo.  This blog project began.

Today is the 11th anniversary of this blog.

16_12_08_screenshot_visits_01This photo was a shot from my apartment window in Rome on the evening of the day Pope Benedict was elected.

I started it with the original intention of it being an archive for articles I was writing for The Wanderer about liturgical translations.  Thus, it’s original name.  That column, by the way, began before the release of Liturgiam authenticam.

That was the intention, but the blog rapidly took on a life of its own.

Since I started keeping stats, on 23 November 2006, I have had about 78.6 million page views and 50.7 million unique visits.  People come from all over the world, as you can see from the screen shot of the live visit feed just before I posted this.

Dear readers, please accept my thanks for everything, your comments and feedback, your prayers and your patience with me.

Tomorrow I will say Mass for the intention of my benefactors and donors.

This is what the blog looked like back then.  A screen shot from about a month after its inception.

16_12_08_wdtprs_2006

Posted in Lighter fare | Tagged | 43 Comments

ADVENTCAzT 12: “You are the royal door for the heavenly King…”

Here is ADVENTCAzT 12, for Thursday of the 2nd Week of Advent, Immaculate Conception.

Today features a lovely hymn.

These 5 minute offerings, to help you prepare for the upcoming feast as well as for your own, personal, meeting with the Lord, are a token of gratitude for my benefactors who donate and send items from my wishlist.  Thank you!

Make some Mystic Monk Coffee and have a listen!

Some music used: US HERE – UK HERE

Please chime in if you listened.  I read and need the feedback.

PS: These podcasts should also be available through my iTunes feed, though in years past I have had problems with it. Let me know how you are listening.  Through the plug in on this post? Through iTunes? Downloading?

Hymn: Originally O gloriosa Domina, composed by Venantius Fortunatus (+609) and changed around a bit by Pope Urban VIII in 1632.

O gloriosa virginum,
Sublimis inter sidera,
Qui te creavit, parvulum
Lactente nutris ubere.

Quod Heva tristis abstulit,
Tu reddis almo germine:
Intrent ut astra flebiles,
Caeli recludis cardines.

Tu regis alti ianua,
Et aula lucis fulgida:
Vitam datam per Virginem
Gentes redemptae plaudite.

Iesu, tibi sit gloria,
Qui natus es de Virgine,
Cum Patre, et almo Spiritu
In sempiterna saecula.

Posted in SESSIUNCULA | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

NEW CHRISTMAS CD from the Friars of the Dominican House of Studies

This is a GREAT new offering from the Dominican Friars at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington DC, right now probably the best school of theology in these USA.

US HERE – UK HERE

Pretty good, no?

They have some examples of Dominican Chant, which differs a bit from Gregorian Chant.

Posted in The Campus Telephone Pole | Tagged , | 5 Comments

ADVENTCAzT 11: “Let your words be their own defense”

Here is ADVENTCAzT 11, for Wednesday of the 2nd Week of Advent.

Pointed words today from a great Doctor of the Church about teaching with unmistakable clarity of meaning.

These 5 minute offerings, to help you prepare for the upcoming feast as well as for your own, personal, meeting with the Lord, are a token of gratitude for my benefactors who donate and send items from my wishlist.  Thank you!

Make some Mystic Monk Coffee and have a listen!

Some Advent music: US HERE – UK HERE

Please chime in if you listened.  I read and need the feedback.

PS: These podcasts should also be available through my iTunes feed, though in years past I have had problems with it. Let me know how you are listening.  Through the plug in on this post? Through iTunes? Downloading?

From a Letter of Ambrose to Bishop Constantius in 379 (ep. 2 or else Letter 12 in some books):

You have entered upon the office of bishop. Sitting at the helm of the Church, you pilot the ship against the waves. Take firm hold of the rudder of faith so that the severe storms of this world cannot disturb you. The sea is mighty and vast, but do not be afraid, for as Scripture says: he has founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the waters.
The Church of the Lord is built upon the rock of the apostles among so many dangers in the world; it therefore remains unmoved. The Church’s foundation is unshakeable and firm against the assaults of the raging sea. Waves lash at the Church but do not shatter it. Although the elements of this world constantly beat upon the Church with crashing sounds, the Church possesses the safest harbour of salvation for all in distress. Although the Church is tossed about on the sea, it rides easily on rivers, especially those rivers that Scripture speaks of: The rivers have lifted up their voice. These are the rivers flowing from the heart of the man who is given drink by Christ and who receives from the Spirit of God. When these rivers overflow with the grace of the Spirit, they lift up their voice.
There is also a stream which flows down on God’s saints like a torrent. There is also a rushing river giving joy to the heart that is at peace and makes for peace. Whoever has received from the fullness of this river, like John the Evangelist, like Peter and Paul, lifts up his voice. Just as the apostles lifted up their voices and preached the Gospel throughout the world, so those who drink these waters begin to preach the good news of the Lord Jesus.
Drink, then, from Christ, so that your voice may also be heard. Store up in your mind the water that is Christ, the water that praises the Lord. Store up water from many sources, the water that rains down from the clouds of prophecy.
Whoever gathers water from the mountains and leads it to himself or draws it from springs, is himself a source of dew like the clouds. Fill your soul, then, with this water, so that your land may not be dry, but watered by your own springs.
He who reads much and understands much, receives his fill. He who is full, refreshes others. So Scripture says: If the clouds are full, they will pour rain upon the earth.
Therefore, let your words be rivers, clean and limpid, so that in your exhortations you may charm the ears of your people. And by the grace of your words win them over to follow your leadership. Let your sermons be full of understanding. Solomon says: The weapons of the understanding are the lips of the wise; and in another place he says: Let your lips be bound with wisdom. That is, let the meaning of your words shine forth, let understanding blaze out. See that your addresses and expositions do not need to invoke the authority of others, but let your words be their own defence. Let no word escape your lips in vain or be uttered without depth of meaning.

Posted in ADVENTCAzT, ADVENTCAzT, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, Patristiblogging, PODCAzT | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

YOUR URGENT PRAYER REQUESTS

Please use the sharing buttons! Thanks!

Registered or not, will you in your charity please take a moment look at the requests and to pray for the people about whom you read?

Continued from THESE.

I get many requests by email asking for prayers. Many requests are heart-achingly grave and urgent.

As long as my blog reaches so many readers in so many places, let’s give each other a hand. We should support each other in works of mercy.

If you have some prayer requests, feel free to post them below.

You have to be registered here to be able to post.

I still have a pressing personal petition.  Two, in fact.

Posted in Urgent Prayer Requests | 43 Comments

Bp. Schneider: attacks on Four Cardinals, Five Dubia like time of Soviet Union

At LifeSite we read interesting remarks by Bp. Athanasius Schneider of Kazakhstan. Bp. Schneider made an interesting comparison.  about a conference held in Rome. Present were the two of the Four Cardinals (Burke, Brandmüller) who submitted the Five Dubia and Bp. Athanasius Schneider of Kazakhstan. Bp. Schneider made an interesting comparison.

Bishop Schneider likens treatment of four Cardinals to Soviet regime: ‘We live in a climate of threats’

Regarding the dubia [The Five Dubia] published by the four Cardinals, [The Four Cardinals] he told LifeSiteNews in an exclusive interview today that the Church should always foster a “culture of dialogue.”

“The formulation of dubia, as the Cardinals here have expressed in their own terms, has been a common practice in the Church,” he explained. “We need to be able to ask questions openly without being afraid of repressions.”

Bishop Schneider referred to the numerous attacks that the four Princes of the Church have suffered after their dubia was published. The questions still remain unanswered by Pope Francis.

“The reaction to the dubia is a proof of the climate in which we actually live in the Church right now,” Bishop Schneider said. “We live in a climate of threats and of denial of dialogue towards a specific group.”

Schneider went to say that “dialogue seems to be accepted only if you think like everyone else – that is practically like a regime.”

Schneider brought up his experience in Russia, where he was born in the time of the Soviet Union. His parents were sent by Stalin to work camps, or “Gulags,” after the Second World War. “If you didn’t follow the line of the party, or you questioned it, you couldn’t even ask. That is for me a very clear parallel to what is happening now in the reactions to the dubia — questions — of the Cardinals.”

“This is a very sad experience especially since everybody is speaking about a ‘dialogue of culture’ after the Second Vatican Council. While bishops openly teach heresies and nothing happens to them, that is truly a grave injustice and very sad,” Bishop Schneider added.

“If the Pope does not answer, the next step will be recourse to prayer, to supernatural means,” Schneider said, “to pray for the enlightenment of the Pope and that he will gain courage.”

[…]

 

Moderation queue is ON.

Posted in Our Catholic Identity, The Coming Storm, The Drill, The future and our choices | Tagged , , , , | 24 Comments