Dr. Peters on Sr. Walsh’s piece in America Magazine

The distinguished canonist Ed Peters has a response to a piece from Sr. Mary Ann Walsh, who used to work at the USCCB and who now writes for Jesuit-run Amerika Magazine.

Dr. Peters doesn’t have a combox, so… I’ll open mine up for intelligent and thoughtful commentary.

More confusion about sacramentality, and then some
by Dr. Edward Peters

The redoubtable Sr. Mary Ann Walsh, rsm, late of the USCCB, has, I am sorry to say, published in America a muddled overview of options for divorced-and-remarried Catholics. Let’s try to sort some of it out.

First—and I don’t mind repeating this till my dying day—annulments are about the validity of marriage not about sacramentality. Walsh muffs this crucial distinction at least five times in her essay. [Yes, sad to say she does. But we have even seen articles from tribunal personnel who screw this up. I was talking to a priest friend the other day, who quipped: No one really understands marriage. It's a mystery.]

There are millions of presumptively valid marriages out there (untold numbers of which were entered into with the Church’s express or implied authorization) that are not sacramental. Sacramentality is a consequence of the parties’ baptismal status—not about capacity for, consent to, or observance of ‘form’ in, marrying. [Get that? Drill it into your skull!] Annulments look only into the latter three points for only they impact the validity of marriage. The distinction between validity and sacramentality in marriage is vital not only for clear thinking about the annulment process or pastoral preparation for marriage but also for the Church’s wider social defense of marriage as a natural institution (a defense that collapses if the Church is restricted to defending only in-house religious ceremonies). Anyone who repeatedly confuses validity and sacramentality of marriage cannot usefully opine about the annulment process.

Second, Walsh’s comments on “internal forum” fall purely on her recurring-but-mistaken restriction of that process to those who marriages might have been “sacramental”, but her comments about, say, (what canon lawyers view as) “morally uncitable” respondents evidence no awareness on her part that tribunals have dealt with this and many other issues for decades. Yet again, we see advice on complex issues of law and justice being casually offered by those with little or no real experience working within the Church’s legal system and thus, with little or no sense of what is, and often what is not, actually involved in the issues they see.

Third, and perhaps most shockingly, Walsh advocates what is (alleged to be) the Orthodox Church’s approach to divorce and remarriage (basically, allowing divorcees to go thru low-profile subsequent weddings and then to live as married) as if that approach were remotely compatible with Catholic teaching on marriage and sexual morality—let alone in accord with Christ’s own words on about those who divorce spouses and marry others! How the quiet ceremony envisioned by Walsh rehabilitates what the Catechism of the Catholic Church describes as “public and permanent adultery” (CCC 2384) completely escapes me.

I need hardly say it, but, of course non-canonists may, and some of them should, make suggestions for reform of the annulment process, for pastoral outreach to those in irregulars unions, and for the care of Catholics and other Christians in valid if non-sacramental marriages. But such suggestions need to show real understanding of the many issues that most pastors and canonists take for granted in such matters. Lest we spend so much time reinventing the wheel.

When The Book (“the five Cardinals” book) is released on 1 October, the Orthodox oikonomia suggestion will have to be shelved as a non-solution. The Book demolishes that for good.

You can still pre-order The Book at a 25% discount for a ONE MORE DAY!

Click me NOW!

Also available now in the UK! HERE

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Nuns on the Bus: check out their ride!

I was recently sent a link to a page about the Nuns on the Bus tour taking place.  This is effort run by Sr. Simone Campbell of the lobby group NETWORK to sign up as many people who will vote for democrats (the pro-abortion party) as possible.

Here is a video about their luxury bus.

Posted in Dogs and Fleas, Liberals, Magisterium of Nuns, Women Religious | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

ATTENTION MEN: Pluscarden Abbey Monastic Experience Weekend

One of you readers sent this and, especially for my friends across the Pond, I share it here:

Pluscarden Abbey in Moray in NE Scotland is holding a monastic experience weekend for Catholic men aged between 18-35 in November. Pluscarden is a haven of orthodoxy and its previous Abbot is now Bishop of Aberdeen. The Abbey celebrates mass in the ordinary form but does so solely in Latin and all the offices are in Latin.

HERE

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The Feast of Angels

In the older Roman calendar today is the Feast of the Dedication of St. Michael the Archangel, which refers to a basilica dedicated in his honor. This has been the time of year to honor angels for a long time in the Roman Church. The ancient Veronese Sacramentary has an entry for “Natale Basilicae Angeli via Salaria” for 30 September. The Gelasian Sacramentary has a feast for “S. Michaelis Archangeli”. The Gregorian Sacramentary has “Dedicatio Basilionis S. Angeli Michaelis” for 29 September. It is possible that the basilica they were talking about was a long-gone church out the Via Salaria north of Rome. However, there is the monumental statue of St. Michael that looms over the City at the top of Hadrian’s mausoleum, known as Castel Sant’Angelo, placed there after the archangel signaled the end of a plague that had ravaged Rome.

In the new calender today all the Archangels are celebrated, while in the older, traditional calendar we focus on St. Michael.

Here is a nice depiction of all three angels easin’ on down the road with Tobias:

In a few days we will have the Feast of the Guardian Angels.

Do you think about angels?

Do you consider your Guardian Angel or ask for help?

Do you remember that there are also fallen angels?

Posted in Liturgy Science Theatre 3000 | Tagged , | 21 Comments

OLDIE ASK FATHER: Eastern Subdeacon for Roman Solemn Mass? A Clerical Bedtime Story.

Just the day, someone sent me a note about this post.  I noted that it’s one year anniversary was about to strike, and so here it is again.  One year later.

From a reader:

I have a friend who is a Eastern Catholic subdeacon, officially installed in his own rite. [installed?] Would it be possible for him to serve a subdeacon during a Latin Extraordinary Form Solemn high Mass? And if so, which vestments would he wear, his own eastern vestments or the Tunicle?

The Latin Church has its Code of Canon Law and the Eastern Churches have their Code.  For this, we have to consult also the Eastern Code.

Can. 701 of the Eastern Code says:

“For a just cause and with the permission of the eparchial bishop, [like the diocesan bishop in the Latin Church] bishops and presbyters of different Churches sui iuris can concelebrate, especially to foster love and to manifest the unity of the Churches. All follow the prescripts of the liturgical books of the principal celebrant, avoiding any liturgical syncretism whatever, and preferably with all wearing the liturgical vestments and insignia of their own Church sui iuris.

This canon does not mention deacons or subdeacons. However, can. 1501 of the Eastern Code (parallel to can. 19 of the Latin Code) says:

“If an express prescript of law is lacking in a certain matter, a case, unless it is penal, must be resolved according to the canons of the synods and the holy fathers, legitimate custom, the general principles of canon law applied with equity, ecclesiastical jurisprudence and the common and constant canonical doctrine,”…

… and can. 1499 (parallel to can. 17) says, in part,

“If the meaning remains doubtful and obscure, they [laws] must be understood according to parallel passages, if there are such, to the purpose and circumstances of the law, and to the mind of the legislator.”

Let’s pull this all together.

An Eastern subdeacon (who is ordained, not just installed – the Eastern Churches continue to ordain men to the subdiaconate – just WE LATINS SHOULD BE DOING!!) can serve as a subdeacon at Latin Rite Mass, as long as his bishop/eparch permits.

Said subdeacon would follow the rubrics of the Roman Missal, but he would ideally wear the vestments proper to his own Church.

So, to illustrate, ….

nce upon a time in the Diocese of Black Duck at St. Fidelia in Tall Tree Circle, Father the Parish Priest, Guido Schmitz, was blessed with a visit by his 2nd cousin Subdeacon Grigori of the Eparchy of St. Theophan the Recluse.  Father 1st Assistant, upon meeting the Subdeacon, quoth, “We have a real subdeacon! Let’s have a Solemn Mass on Sunday!  Sven can be Deacon.”  Reverend Mister Sven Martínez was a not-quite-elderly Permanent Deacon around the place, rare in his permanent diaconal ministry as an expert in all matters liturgic.

Everyone deemed this a winning plan.

And so they gathered around the black bakelite telephone in the pastor’s office and called Subdeacon Gigori’s's Eparch.

The Eparch, who answered his own phone, was delighted at this opportunity to foster unity between both lungs of the Church.  He, though not a Latin himself, sought every opportunity to underscore that he understood the mens of the Lawgiver in Summorum Pontificum, that the Roman Rite had its great liturgical tradition that rivalled his own.  He knew that Pope Francis had clearly affirmed Benedict’s provisions in TBI™, and that the Supreme Pontiff also had been involved with Eastern Churches in S. America.  Consequently, the Eparch concluded swiftly that it was both pleasing and opportune to deign to grant to the Reverend Subdeacon his Permission.

He added, with not-quite-mock menance, the stern admonishment to “Say The Roman Black and Do The Roman Red!”

Even as they were sharing their goodbyes and protestations of good will, the fax machine spit out the Eparch’s perfectly legible chirograph.  (The Eparch followed up with letters to both the Subdeacon and the parish priest.)

Subdeacon Grigori happened to have all his proper vestments with him.  They had a couple walk-throughs and – badda bing badda boom – ecce Sunday Solemn Mass.

And so it was that that happy Sunday with the Solelmn Mass and the real Eastern Subdeacon, became a matter of fond recollection and anecdotes.

Later in the year, Subdeacon Grigori returned for another visit!  The first stay at St. Fidelia had been so very agreeable both for its liturgical excellence in the Roman Rite – a new experience for the Subdeacon, if you get my drift – and because of the priestly fraternity that he knew was sure to follow the Sacred Synaxis.

This time, however, Subdeacon Grigori was without his own proper Eastern vestments!  They were were in the bag lost by the airline.  ”Haudquaquam mihi molestum’st“, quoth he, in his best effort to fit in with his Latin hosts, “Let us be flexible.”

When it came time for the Solemn Mass, our Subdeacon vested contentedly as a Roman subdeacon, this being the only commonsensical course to pursue.  The music for the Ordinary was the Mass by Stravinsky, in honor of their Western/Eastern, modern/traditional liturgical nexus.

Subdeacon Grigori, as before, flawlessly carried out his subdiaconal ministry according to the Roman Red and Black, not a syllable lacking or gesture out of place.  He even used the thurible in the Roman manner, though afterwards he showed the altar boys how they used it in his Church.

Having decorously mactated the Victim, the clerics went to the Church hall for coffee and doughnuts with the folks. Subdeacon Grigori gave the parishioners a presentation about the differences between Roman and Byzantine liturgy.

Once the pastoral duties were complete, including a baptism and a Churching, the clerics went off together, parish priest, Fathers assistant, and Subdeacon, to St. Ipsidipsy over in the next county.  St. Ipsidipsy was, of course, the infamous parish entrusted to their mutual friend, Msgr. Zuhlsdorf (hey… fiction is the only way I’ll make Monsignor…).  In Monsignor’s rectory they had a light lunch.  Since they were way out in the wilderness, they then repaired, as was their wont, to Monsignor’s private outdoor firing range near the satellite dish arrays, backup generators, CPU cooling tower, bocce ball courts, and various antennae.

Having prayed to St. Gabriel Possenti and their Guardian Angels for steady hands and safety, they proceeded to put thousands of rounds through a variety of handguns. AR-15s with high-capacity magazines were not lacking. A Barrett .50 cal sniper rifle was fired with great effect.

They all agreed with Grigori’s observation that the glint of sunlight off the shower of casings falling to the ground about their feet was not unlike the sparkle of sun in the Holy Water during that morning’s Asperges.

The only dark note in the afternoon came when Father 2nd Assistant’s Sig Sauer P220 jammed from an errant round of .40 cal that had mysteriously made its way into the .45 ammo can. They consulted, set the Sig apart for closer inspection, and Father continued with his Beretta (… what else?).

Every story has its low point, and they had had theirs. It was a grave moment of concern, but their natural, hard-wired conservative, nay rather, even traditional Catholic cheerfulness overcame even that hitch in their afternoon.

Once all the paper was conclusively dead and all the metal targets had been sufficiently rung and spun, they invoked St. Joseph, Defender of the Church and Mary, Queen of the Clergy and sought out the humble church of St. Ipsidipsy where they sanctified their Sunday through Exposition, Vespers (sung antiphonally), and Benediction.

The scent of spent gunpowder mingled with the incense as together they wafted through the waning sunlight from the windows, their ears ringing merrily from both the .50 cal. and the Sanctus bells.

The conclusive clank of the tabernacle’s door sent them back to the rectory to clean their weapons over Campari sodas and then to enjoy homemade Buccatini all’amatriciana, steaks, salad, bottles of Barolo, which Monsignor had prudently opened before even the first round of .45 ACP had been fired.  They tucked in, reviewing news from the blogs, sharing the usual informations priests are privy to – amusing and dire – about diocesan and parish matters, chuckling for a while over a story in the Fishwrap and by turns glowering over the liberals’ continued misinformation campaigns, reviving anecdotes from seminary and past assignments all while not forgetting to proffer current tips on the best places to buy ammo.

The designated driver had been chosen by lot back at St. Fidelia’s (it fell to Father 2nd Assistant, who was therefore to be exempted for the next couple weeks), and so they brought out the cigars, the Warres ’77, the Hennesey XO and the Lagavulin 16.  Unicuique suum, after all, which happened also to be the motto on the coat of arms of Father 3rd Assistant.

His actis sumptisque omnibus, waving goodbye to Monsignor Z, they hitched up their cassocks, piled into the Father Pastor’s spacious new Volkswagen Phaeton, and sped down the road.

And so they came back to St. Fidelia’s, tired but happy.

THE END

Posted in Lighter fare, Linking Back, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000 | Tagged , | 12 Comments

Help the Transalpine Redemptorists!

The Transalpine Redemptorists waaaaaay out on Papa Stronsay of the Scottish coast are doing some campaigning to help them make ends meet. They have a calendar which looks pretty nice.

I had a nice note from “Br. Martin” who sent me a link to a video about it.

To learn more about how to support the the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer on Papa Stronsay click HERE.

Posted in ACTION ITEM!, Brick by Brick | Tagged , | 15 Comments

Your Sunday Sermon Notes

Was there a good point in the Sermon you heard for your Sunday Mass?

Let us know what if was!

(Of more than one, of course, if they’re good.)

Posted in SESSIUNCULA | 25 Comments

ASK FATHER: CQ CQ CQ … QSL?

It’s Ham Saturday for me, it seems. I have had email about Echolink (which I still haven’t gotten into… mea culpa).  And now this, from a reader…

QUAERITUR:

I would like to know what your thoughts on including Catholic art on QSL cards is. I have begun receiving some in the mail, but need to design mine to respond; I was thinking of including some great Catholic imagery (possibly from St. Andrews Daily Missal).

For those of you who don’t know what a QSL card is, when people make long-distance contacts with other hams, they will sometimes exchange, by snail mail, a custom-made postcard which has their callsign and location etc.  It’s a good old-fashioned way to prove that you made the contact and also to build up your ego wall, a visible way to display your contacts to admirers who visit your station or ham shack.  ”QSL?” is a short way of saying or clicking away if you are using Morse, “Do you confirm that you received my transmission?”

As far as I can tell (for I don’t have many), people like to include on their QSL cards little personal touches.  I can’t see the problem in including an image that says something about yourself, provided that it is decent and legal to use and send in the mail.

No, I haven’t made a QSL card yet.

N, I don’t think making contact with others here on this blog in the combox is the right moment to exchange QSL cards.

But… who am I to judge?

Elmer?  Anyone?

73

Posted in "How To..." - Practical Notes, ASK FATHER Question Box, Ham Radio | Tagged , , , , | 18 Comments

Bp. Conry (D. Arundel & Brighton) suddenly resigned. Fr. Z muses.

Please follow!

As I write, the news of the resignation of Bp. Kieran Conry, 63, of the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton in England is hitting social media.  I had an embargoed signal about it, but it is out now.   In a statement, Bp. Conry, clearly of the “progressivist” camp, says that he was not a faithful priest, he says that he didn’t do anything illegal, he resigns his post effective immediately, and he apologized to everyone who will be hurt.

I’m pretty sure this resignation falls on the eve of more information coming out.

The prolific Damian Thompson‘s tweets have been carrying running commentary.  The UK’s best Catholic weekly, The Catholic Herald has a piece already.

I note that, in a “related post” on CH’s sidebar, there is a piece about how the number of confessions is growing in England.  Bp. Conry is quoted.  This was from 5 September.

How quickly things can change.

However, also quoted in that 5 Sept. piece about confessions was my friend Fr. Tim Finigan, formerly of Blackfen and now of Margate.

Fr Tim Finigan, parish priest of Our Lady of the Rosary, Blackfen, Kent, said: “I have also noticed a rise in Confessions, particularly among young adults who are sincerely trying to live a good life. It is important to preserve the core meaning of the sacrament which is the forgiveness of sins. We can always have a more general chat outside of Confession.”

Within two week of Fr. Finigan’s being moved to Margate, the new parish priest at Blackfen began to dismantle what it took the better part of two decades to build.

How quickly things can change.

That said, three points.

First, I hope that faithful Catholics will avoid their own Lord of the Flies Dance with the resignation of Bp. Conry.  Instead, I hope they will recall that everyone in the Church is a sinner and it is precisely because we are all sinners that we have a Savior (that’s Saviour) and our Church.  Instead, pray that the Nuncio Archbp. Mennini will be able to secure an exceptionally good appointment for Arundel and Brighton.

Second, do not rest complacent in what you may have built or gained, even over decades.  Keep your heads on a swivel.  Keep working to build, improve, and strengthen.  Excel in charitable works as the mortar to secure your efforts.

Third, go to confession.  Examine your own consciences, and not other people’s consciences, and GO TO CONFESSION.

Posted in GO TO CONFESSION, The Coming Storm, The Drill | Tagged , , , , | 43 Comments

Pondering Francis

I have been trying for a while now to get my head around what Pope Francis might really think about economics and markets and so forth.  I have been puzzled by a few of his remarks. I think I am not alone in that.

I saw in interesting interview at Real Clear Religion with Rocco Buttiglione, who played a role in the economic views of St. John Paul II.

[...]

RCR: Does Pope Francis have the same kind of philosophical heft that Wojty?a had?

RB: No. He is a different man.

RCR: Is that problematic for the Church?

RB: I don’t think so. We have had a pope who was a great philosopher, we had a pope who was a great theologian, and now we have a pope who has a great pastoral spirit. The Church needs all. I dare say that after those two popes we surely need a pope like Francis because the Curia is a mess and you need someone who has the capacity of clearing that mess.

RCR: You’re often credited for bringing Wojty?a to free market ideas, especially in the context of Centesimus Annus. How did you seem to persuade him?

RB: I would not put it that way, but I was a friend. As Don Ricci had done with me, I talked to Wojtyla about my friends and the things I saw in the world. Sometimes he asked me to do this or that for him, and that’s all.

RCR: Do you think Pope Francis needs a similar education on economics?

RB: Well, you had a pope from Poland who came to understand and love North America much more than anybody could imagine. Now you have a pope who comes from Latin America and in dialogue with him, we must try to explain other things. He is a pope that cannot be only Latin American, but he has to enlarge his horizons. How will he do that?

One of the first things John Paul II did when he became pope was go to Latin America. There he gave a series of homilies, which are a kind of regional encyclical. This encyclical is not against liberation theology, but it is an encyclical that says: We want a theology that is from the point of view from Latin American people. Fine. We want a theology that is written from the point of view of the Latin American poor. Even better! You think that you can produce this theology by using Marxism? That’s wrong. You need a different instrument to approach socio-economic realities from a point of view of a true liberation theology.

I remember one day Don Ricci and I were in Lima, Peru and we were talking with a group of liberation theologians. It was the day of the feast of Señor de los Milagros, and all the people were in the streets. I told the theologians: You talk about the people? Please open the door and look on the streetsThey are the people! They are people who are not Marx’s proletariat; they are a people of culture and religion.

Then we started working in Latin America to create groups that wanted to make a true liberation theology. Some wanted to condemn all liberation theology, and there was the first instruction from the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, which was very harsh.

I went around visiting different countries and when I came back, John Paul II invited me to one of his “working dinners.” In the end, he asked me: There is the theoretical side, but how is Gustavo Gutiérrez as a man? Does he say Mass? Does he pray the Rosary? Does he confess people? Yes? Then we must find another solution.

After that came the second instruction on liberation theology, which made a distinction between true liberation theology and Marxist liberation theology.

RCR: Which liberation theology is Francis influenced by?

RB: He is not a Marxist. Politically, he is a Justicialista. Westerners might call it populist. Justicialismo in Argentina has been a tremendous movement, giving for the first time to the people the idea that they have dignity. They are anti-capitalist and anti-Marxist. There is an Anglo-Saxon model of capitalism, which is the “self-made man.” That’s American. But that’s not capitalism in Argentina. Capitalism there is where a few people use the contracts given by the state without taking the risk of the market make an enormous amount of money and oppress other people. It is a capitalism created by the State.

If I could suggest to Pope Francis the reading of a book, I would suggest he read Friedrich Hayek’s The Counter-Revolution of Science: Studies on the Abuse of Reason. This might help him.

[...]

Justicialismo…  good grief.  Who of us up here in the North can grasp what on earth has gone on in Argentina?  The more I read about the place, and its modern history, the less I understand.  Do you have be Argentinian to get it?  Does anyone understand Perónism, with all its layers and bands along the ideological spectrum?  I’d be pretty skeptical were someone to make that claim.  Take a look on Google for something on Justicialismo.  There is nearly nothing useful in English.  I read Spanish, but… sheesh… this has been entirely ignored.

I recently heard a talk about Pope Francis with a South American journalist who is the head of CNA and ACI Prensa, Alejandro Bermudez (whose background is, in part, Argentinian).  He clarified a few things for me and proposed some others.  In no particular order….

Concerning the Argentinian view of capitalism, I think I now better grasp the Holy Father’s (and that of whoever was doing some ghostwriting for him) dim view of capitalism, especially of so-called “trickle down” economics.  You will recall that that Francis mentioned this in his Post-Synodal Exhortation Evangelii gaudium and that there was controversy about the (bad) English translation.  To simplify: if up here in the North we think of “trickle down” as wealth pouring into a cup and, when the cup fills, it overflows and runs downward to the next level, thus helping to raise others up from poverty, in Argentina there would be a different view.  There is no “trickle down”, because as the wealth pours into the cup, the cup gets bigger and bigger so that nothing escapes over the edge.  This is the Argentinian experience.  And so in the matter of personal economics, we individuals and families with our little economies might go off the rails of charity when we say something like “I’ll help the poor after I get my second boat.”  As we gain wealth, rather than than overflow our boundaries, we expand our boundaries into more personal stuff.

Furthermore, Bermudez spoke of the influence on Francis of thinkers such as the Uruguayan writer-theologian Alberto Methol Ferré, the Russian-American sociologist Pitirim Sorokin, and the pivotal Spanish-language poet Rubén Darío.  To condense wildly, it seems that Francis may breathe in a school of thought that sees a kind of “manifest destiny” for Latin America.  When cultures develop a interior decay, which they always do, revitalization of the cultures comes from “peripheries”.  For the larger Church, experiencing an interior decay, a periphery is Latin America.  Latin America, unlike any other continent, is unified in language (by far dominated by Spanish with related Portughese) and is/was unified in religion, Catholicism (though there is bad erosion).  With these unifying factors, Latin America has a critical role to play.  Also, if you are playing attention, Francis seems to use the word “periphery” a lot.  This not quite the same thing as “margin”.

Alas, we in the North have in general paid scant attention to what’s going on intellectually “down there”.  Thus, I have no idea who Alberto Methol Ferré and Rubén Darío are.  I guess I had heard of Sorokin, but I know little to nothing about him other than he explored a cyclic theory of societies.   A lot of us in the North are a bit crippled when it comes to ferreting out what Pope Francis is up to.

I had read that, while Pope Francis is a staunch opponent of Marxist-based Liberation Theology, he did embrace a kind of “liberation theology” that flowed from the devotion of the people.  If I (and others I talk to, and Buttiglione and Bermudez) are right about these things, then I may be getting closer to understanding a key element of Francis’ of economics, the North, etc.

Lastly, it could be that Francis, who has been placed on a pretty steep learning curve, now has an opportunity to learn something about the North and its ways and views.  It may be that his time in Germany, his only experience of the North aside from occasional visits to Rome, tainted his view of all of the Church in the North.  In Germany he would have experienced a Church with a lot of money and fewer and fewer believers.  I suspect that when and if he makes his first North American visit, he many encounter something that he hasn’t yet experienced.  It could be also that, as he meets representatives from North American Catholic organizations and hears about what they do, he is gaining a new insight into the Church in the wealthy North Western Quadrant.

I look forward to input especially from South American readers and, in particular, Argentinians.

Posted in Pope Francis, The Drill | Tagged , , , , , | 51 Comments