San Francisco MASS Mob Results

A while back I mentioned that there was going to be a “Mass Mob” at Star of the Sea parish in San Francisco to support the beleaguered priests.

It seems to have been a success. I received a few photos.  Here is a good one!

15_04_27_MassMob_exit

30 votes, 4.67 avg. rating (92% score)
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ACTION ITEM! US CLERGY! Sign letter urging Synod to uphold Catholic teaching on marriage and family!

15_04_25_Credo_priestsI want to bump this to the top so that more priests will see it after a busy weekend.

____

Published on: Apr 25, 2015 @ 9:58

_____
You will recall that hundreds of priests in England signed a letter, published in the Catholic Herald, urging the upcoming Synod to uphold Catholic doctrine and discipline concerning marriage and the family.  HERE

That letter created a stir.

I now see that there is an American initiative for Catholic priests to sign a similar letter!

HERE

Signers, be patient.  It seems that your names will not post automatically.  I think that someone must verify the names, which is a good idea.  There will be a delay.

Lay people, please let your priests know about this initiative and ask them to sign it.  Tell them you’ll be watching the list.

I urge all the priestly readers to sign this letter.  I have.

To the Synod Fathers:

In union with our brother priests in the United Kingdom (conforming to the teachings summarized in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1650-51), we make our own the petition they signed urging the Synod Fathers in the upcoming Synod to stand firm on the Church’s traditional understanding of marriage, human sexuality and pastoral practices:

Following the Extraordinary Synod of Bishops in Rome in October 2014 much confusion has arisen concerning Catholic moral teaching. In this situation we wish, as Catholic priests, to re-state our unwavering fidelity to the traditional doctrines regarding marriage and the true meaning of human sexuality, founded on the Word of God and taught by the Church’s Magisterium for two millennia.

We commit ourselves anew to the task of presenting this teaching in all its fullness, while reaching out with the Lord’s compassion to those struggling to respond to the demands and challenges of the Gospel in an increasingly secular society. Furthermore we affirm the importance of upholding the Church’s traditional discipline regarding the reception of the sacraments, and the millennial conviction that doctrine and practice remain firmly and inseparably in harmony.

We urge all those who will participate in the second Synod in October 2015 to make a clear and firm proclamation of the Church’s unchanging moral teaching, so that confusion may be removed, and faith confirmed.

Yours faithfully,

Signed:

The priests are listed over there.  So far there are 2 bishops and 119 priests at the time of this posting, but I imagine there is a long queue.

Heh heh… the person doing the verification is about to get an avalanche.

Fr. Z Kudos and ¡Hagan lío!

UPDATE: 

We need a #hashtag for twitter.

#USPriests2Synod

UPDATE 24 April 2311 GMT:

Priests 191
Bishops 2

UPDATE 26 April 1854 GMT

Priests 260
Bishops 2

UPDATE 27 April 1445 GMT

Priests 330
Bishops 2

12 votes, 4.00 avg. rating (80% score)
Posted in ACTION ITEM!, Fr. Z KUDOS, Mail from priests, One Man & One Woman, Our Catholic Identity, Priests and Priesthood, Si vis pacem para bellum!, The Coming Storm, ¡Hagan lío! | Tagged , , | 16 Comments

IDAHO: City ordinance says pastors must “marry” homosexuals or go to jail

In the Washington Times I read this.

Idaho city’s ordinance tells pastors to marry gays or go to jail

Coeur d‘Alene, Idaho, city officials have laid down the law to Christian pastors within their community, telling them bluntly via an ordinance that if they refuse to marry homosexuals, they will face jail time and fines.

The dictate comes on the heels of a legal battle with Donald and Evelyn Knapp, ordained ministers who own the Hitching Post wedding chapel in the city, but who oppose gay marriage, The Daily Caller reported.

A federal judge recently ruled that the state’s ban on gay marriage was unconstitutional, while the city of Coeur d‘Alene has an ordinance that prevents discrimination based on sexual preference.

The Supreme Court’s recent refusal to take on gay rights’ appeals from five states has opened the doors for same-sex marriages to go forth.

The Knapps were just asked by a gay couple to perform their wedding ceremony, The Daily Caller reported.

“On Friday, a same-sex couple asked to be married by the Knapps, and the Knapps politely declined,” The Daily Signal reported. “The Knapps now face a 180-day jail term and a $1,000 fine for each day they decline to celebrate the same-sex wedding.”

[…]

Read the rest over there.

Mind you, it won’t go anywhere, but it doesn’t have to succeed… right now.   Liberals use the technique of creeping incrementalism.   They know they will fail… this time.  But each time they bump the needle one more degree in their direction and pick up a few more supporters for their cause.

So… see what’s happening?

Fathers! Get ready!

Si vis pacem para bellum!

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Posted in Liberals, One Man & One Woman, Our Catholic Identity, Religious Liberty, Si vis pacem para bellum!, Sin That Cries To Heaven, The Coming Storm, The future and our choices, The Last Acceptable Prejudice | 16 Comments

National Morse Code Day… and….

… National Prime Rib Day!

Try to contain the excitement!

morse code day

 

A frequent commentator on Ham matters here, LarryW2LJ has more.  HERE

To celebrate this day, here is the theme for Inspector Morse, one of the best TV series themes ever and a whale of a good show.

A spin off from Inspector Morse is Inspector Lewis.

8 votes, 3.88 avg. rating (78% score)
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Your Sunday Sermon Notes

Was there a good point made in the sermon during the Mass you heard for your Sunday obligation?

Let us know.

1 vote, 1.00 avg. rating (51% score)
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WDTPRS: 4th Sunday of Easter (2002MR) – Our humility and the might of the Shepherd

sacrophagus Good ShepherdFor this 4th Sunday of Easter, Good Shepherd Sunday, we have a little gem for a Collect.

Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, deduc nos ad societatem caelestium gaudiorum, ut eo perveniat humilitas gregis, quo processit fortitudo pastoris.

Note the nice eo…quo construction and the rhythmic endings of clauses which makes the prayer so singable.  There is synchesis in the last part, a parallelism of grammatical forms “ut A-B-C-D, A-B-C-D”.

The prayer’s structure resembles the orderly procession the vocabulary invokes.

Procedo is “to come forth” as well as “to advance, proceed to.”  It comes also to mean, “to result as a benefit for” someone or something.  Think of English “proceeds”, as in money raised for a cause.  “Procession” (apart from the liturgical meaning) is a theological term describing how the Persons of the Trinity relate to each other. A societas is “a fellowship, association, union, community”, that is, a group united for some common purpose.  I’ll render it as “communion”, which gets to the relationship we will have in heaven and, in anticipation, as members of Holy Church.

There is a nice contrast in humilitas and fortitudo.  They seem to be opposites.

True to the ancient Roman spirit, humilitas has the negative connotation of “lowness”, in the sense of being base or abject: humus means “soil”.  On the other hand, fortitudo means “strength” and even “the manliness shown in enduring or undertaking hardship, bravery, courage.” In the 8th century Gelasian Sacramentary, whence comes today’s prayer, that fortitudo was originally celsitudo (“loftiness of carriage”, also a title like “Highness”). Fortitudo could poetically refer to Christ’s moral strength and endurance in His Passion and death.  Moreover, Our Lord chooses the weak and makes them strong with His strength, His fortitudo (cf 1 Corinthians 1:26-28).

Weakness and strength are not to be measured by worldly successes.

LITERAL ATTEMPT:

Almighty eternal God, lead us unto the communion of heavenly joys, so that the humility of the flock may attain that place to which the might of the shepherd has advanced.

OBSOLETE ICEL (1973):

Almighty and ever-living God, give us new strength from the courage of Christ our shepherd, and lead us to join the saints in heaven.

CURRENT ICEL (2011):

Almighty ever-living God, lead us to a share in the joys of heaven, so that the humble flock may reach where the brave Shepherd has gone before.

Translators occasionally turn an abstract idea that sounds like a possession (a trope called synecdoche), as in “the humility of the flock” or “the might of the shepherd”, into a characteristic of the possessor, as in “the humble flock” or “the mighty shepherd”.  I think we lose something beautiful in that exchange.  You decide.

In our Collect is the image of Christ as shepherd. In mighty resolve He precedes us, the humble flock. He leads us back to that from which He first proceeded, communion with the Father and the Spirit.

In the Greek Neo-Platonic philosophy that informed early Christian thought we often find the paradigm of going forth (proodos, or Latin exitus), a turning around, and returning back (epistrophe, reditus).  It seems to me that this common ancient pattern is echoed in today’s ancient prayer.

This Collect also reminds me of mosaics in the apses of Christian basilicas.

Mosaics are assembled from tiny bits of colored stone, tesserae, into beautiful spiritual works with many symbols.  Up close, individual tesserae are unremarkable, often flawed.  Once a great artist gathers and arranges them according to a plan, they proceed to dazzle and amaze.  Holy Church is rather like a mosaic: just as one tessera makes the others more beautiful, we small individual Catholics, with different vocations, in diverse places, and even distant eras in history, play important roles in a larger societas.

The mosaics in apses of ancient and Romanesque churches often depict Christ dressed in glorious imperial trappings.  Apostles and saints, His celestial court, stand on either side bracketed in turn by Bethlehem or the earthly and heavenly Jerusalem.  Beneath the feet of Christ, mighty Shepherd King, are lines of courtly sheep, hooves elegantly raised as they process into a green safe place where water flows, symbolizing the river Jordan and our baptism, a refrigerium.

The Second Person of the Trinity, the Son, proceeded from the Father from all eternity. He proceeded into this world in a mighty gesture of self-emptying in order to save us from our sins, turn us away from sin and death, and open for us the way to salvation.

In His first coming, Christ came in humility to take up our fallen societas, our humilitas, His grex, into an indestructible societas with His divinity. In His second coming, clothed in His own fortitudo He will shepherd us into a new societas in heaven.

If you are a sheep who has strayed, come back now to His fold, Holy Catholic Church.

I include in this category of straying sheep those who dissent from the doctrine of the Church the Good Shepherd founded.

S M Trastevere sheep mosaic

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Heads up! Reactions to my post about destruction of Christian businesses still rolling in.

15_04_26_WSJ_article_01Reactions to my post When they come to destroy your business because you are pro-traditional family are still rolling in. It was cited quite a few news outlets and blogs.

Today, Sunday, there is a piece in the local paper where I am, Madison, which features it. HERE

The article isn’t entirely hostile, although it ends decidedly on a pro-“gay” note. I suspect the combox there will quickly turn into Lord of the Flies.

This is a perfect storm for a secular MSM outlet’s combox: homosexuals, the Catholic Church, a priest, current events in a über-liberal city.

So, this is a heads-up.

Should any of you readers sense a need to get involved in that combox discussion, as it develops, I ask only that you think before posting, review and proof your comments, and maintain an even-headed, polite and rational tone regardless of the invective and absurdities you read.

There is an a “Report Abuse” button by each posted comment.

Review the rules for posting there.

23 votes, 4.09 avg. rating (81% score)
Posted in Biased Media Coverage, Liberals, One Man & One Woman, Our Catholic Identity, Religious Liberty, Sin That Cries To Heaven, The Coming Storm, The future and our choices, The Last Acceptable Prejudice | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments

CQ CQ CQ – Ham Radio Saturday

To all you Hams out there, some news.

I decided the get the General License exam under my belt, so I am studying diligently every day.  I haven’t seen math like this since physics about 30 years ago.

Also, I received recently a Radiogram from a station, perhaps a priest ham’s, in Cincinnati.  I’m not sure what to do with this, or how to respond properly according to good ham usage.  I believe one of you mentioned responding through NTS the last time I got a radiogram, from Harrisburg, PA  Alas, I didn’t.  My bad.  Maybe you hams out there should push me a little and break it down Barney style.

Also, I haven’t yet done anything with Echolink.  Perhaps we should jump start that?

That’s that.

It still have almost no equipment, other than my little YAESU VX8-DR and a whip antenna, which one of you dear readers sent me some time ago from my wish list. I often say a prayer for the sender when I switch it on.

73

UPDATE:

Oh yes… I figured out how to pick up PSK31 with an app on my phone. Rather cool.

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Benedict XVI 10 years ago: “Pray for me…”

My friend Fr. Rutler reminded me today that 10 years ago yesterday, 24 April, Pope Benedict XVI, during his sermon for the beginning of his too brief pontificate, said, among other:

[…]

One of the basic characteristics of a shepherd must be to love the people entrusted to him, even as he loves Christ whom he serves. “Feed my sheep”, says Christ to Peter, and now, at this moment, he says it to me as well. Feeding means loving, and loving also means being ready to suffer. Loving means giving the sheep what is truly good, the nourishment of God’s truth, of God’s word, the nourishment of his presence, which he gives us in the Blessed Sacrament. My dear friends – at this moment I can only say: pray for me, that I may learn to love the Lord more and more. Pray for me, that I may learn to love his flock more and more – in other words, you, the holy Church, each one of you and all of you together. Pray for me, that I may not flee for fear of the wolves. Let us pray for one another, that the Lord will carry us and that we will learn to carry one another.

[…]

I found the FNC coverage of the election (I was on with Chris Wallace and Greg Burke):

I found the video of the Inaugural Mass:

20 votes, 4.20 avg. rating (83% score)
Posted in Benedict XVI, Linking Back | Tagged | 26 Comments

WDTPRS 3rd Sunday after Easter (1962MR): Be distinguished by your profession of Christ!

This Sunday’s Collect survived the knives of the liturgical experts and was inserted into the 1970 Missale Romanum on the 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time. The redactors who glued the Novus Ordo together, however, removed the word iustitiae, thus returning it to the form it had in the ancient Gelasian Sacramentary. Other ancient sacramentaries, such as the Liber sacramentorum Gellonensis as well as the Augustodunensis had the iustitiae. In any event, by the time St. Pius V issued the the Missale Romanum of 1570, which I am sure you have on hand, someone had seen fit to make it read, “in viam possint redire iustitiae”, which endured until the 1970MR and subsequent editions.

COLLECT (1962MR):

Deus, qui errantibus, ut in viam possint redire iustitiae, veritatis tuae lumen ostendis, da cunctis qui christiana professione censentur, et illa respuere, quae huic inimica sunt nomini, et ea quae sunt apta sectari.

Stylistically snappy! It has nice alliteration and a powerful rhythm in the last line. I think there is a trace here of John 14, which I will show you below. Can we also find a connection between this Collect in a phrase from the Roman statesman Cassiodorus (+c. 585 – consul in 514 and then Boethius’ successor as magister officiorum under the Ostrogothic King Theodoric)? Cassiodorus wrote, “Sed potest aliquis et in via peccatorum esse et ad viam iterum redire iustitiae? … But can someone be both in the way of sins and also return again to the way of justice?” (cf. Exp. Ps. 13). Is this prayer old enough to have been known by Milan’s mighty Bishop St. Ambrose (+397) or even St. Augustine of Hippo (+430), who use similar patterns of words?

Your thorough Lewis & Short Dictionary says censeo has a special construction: censeo, censeri aliqua re, meaning “to be appreciated, distinguished, celebrated for some quality”, “to be known by something.” This explains the passive form in our Collect with the ablative christiana professione. Getting christiana professio into English requires some fancy footwork. We could say “Christian profession”, but this adjectival construction really means “profession of Christ.” This same thing happens in phrases such as oratio dominica, “the Lordly Prayer”, or more smoothly “the Lord’s Prayer”.

Via means, “a way, method, mode, manner, fashion, etc., of doing any thing, course”. There is a moral content to via as well, “the right way, the true method, mode, or manner”.

Let’s see what people used to hear in church on the 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time in the…

OBSOLETE ICEL (1973):

God our Father,
your light of truth
guides us to the way of Christ.
May all who follow him
reject what is contrary to the gospel.

And now, ….

LITERAL RENDERING:

O God, who do show the light of Your truth to the erring so that they might be able to return unto the way of justice, grant to all who are distinguished by their profession of Christ that they may both strongly reject those things which are inimical to this name of Christian and follow eagerly the things which are suited to it.

CURRENT ICEL (2011):

O God, who show the light of your truth
to those who go astray,
so that they may return to the right path,
give all who for the faith they profess
are accounted Christians
the grace to reject whatever is contrary to the name of Christ
and to strive after all that does it honor.

Ancient philosophers (the word comes from Greek for “lover of wisdom”) would walk about in public in their sandals and draped toga-like robes. Thinker such as Aristotle were called “Peripatetics” from their practice of walking about (Greek peripatein) under covered walkways of the Lyceum in Athens (Greek peripatos) while teaching. Their disciples would swarm around them, hanging on their words, debating with them, learning how to think and reason. They would discuss the deeper questions the human mind and heart inevitably faces. They were effectively theologians. We must be careful not to impose the modern divorce of philosophy from theology on the ancients. In ancient Christian mosaics Christ is sometimes depicted wearing a philosopher’s robes. But He doesn’t merely love Wisdom, He is Wisdom incarnate, the perfect Teacher!

He is the one from whom we learn about God and about ourselves (cf. Gaudium et spes 22 – which the young Pope John Paul II helped to write during the Council).

The Collect also reminds me of the very first lines of the Divine Comedy by the exiled Florentine poet Dante Alighieri (+1321) who was heavily influenced by Aristotle’s Ethics and the Christianized Platonic philosophy mediated through Boethius (+525) and St. Thomas Aquinas (+1274). The Inferno begins:

Midway in the journey of our life
I came to myself in a dark wood,
for the straight way was lost.
Ah, how hard it is to tell
the nature of that wood, savage, dense, and harsh –
the very thought of it renews my fear!
It is so bitter death is hardly more so.

Dante, the protagonist of his own poem, is describing his fictional self. In his poetic persona, Dante is in the middle of his life (35 years old – half of 70, the number of years mentioned as man’s span in Ps. 90:10). He is mired in sin and irrational behavior, having strayed from the straight path of the life of reason: he is in the “dark wood”.

The life of persistent sin is a life without true reason. Human reason, when left to itself without the light of grace, is crippled.

Dante likens his confused state to death. He must journey through hell and the purification of purgatory in order to come back to the life of virtue and reason. In the course of the three-part Comedy the Poet finds the proper road back to light, Truth and reason through the intercession of Christ-like figures, such as Beatrice, and then through Christ Himself. In the Comedy, Dante recovers the use of reason. His whole person is reintegrated through the light of Truth.

Don’t we often describe people who are ignorant, confused or obtuse as “wandering around in the dark”? This applies also to persistent sinners. By their choices and resistance to God’s grace they have lost the light of Truth. God’s grace makes it possible for us to find our way back into the right path, no matter how far from it we have strayed in the past. When we sin, we break our relationship with Christ. If in laziness we should refuse to know Him better (every day), we lose sight of ourselves and our neighbor.

Christ, the incarnate Word, gives us consolation:

“‘Let not your hearts be troubled; believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many rooms; if it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And when I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also. And you know the way (via) where I am going.’ Thomas said to him, ‘Lord, we do not know where you are going; how can we know the way (via)?’ Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way (via), and the truth (veritas), and the life (vita); no one comes to the Father, but by me. If you had known me, you would have known my Father also; henceforth you know him and have seen him…. He who has seen me has seen the Father’” (cf. John 14:1-6 RSV).

We Catholics, who dare – DARE - publicly to take Christ’s name to ourselves, need to stand up and be counted (censentur)!

In what we say and do other people ought to be able to see Christ’s light reflected and focused in the details of our individual vocations. To be good lenses and reflectors of Christ’s light, we must be clean. When we know ourselves not to be so, we are obliged as soon as possible to seek cleansing so that we can be saved and be of benefit for the salvation of others. We must also practice spiritual works of mercy, bringing the light of truth to the ignorant or those who persist in darkness either through their own fault or no fault of their own.

Every Catholic is called to evangelize, if not in an “official” capacity in the Church’s name, at least through the obligation we have as members of Christ’s Body the Church.

Evangelization and the efforts of ecumenism are an obligation for every Catholic.  There are still people living in darkness. We must “preach” always and, as the phrase often attributed to St. Francis of Assisi says, sometimes use words.

When people look at us and listen to us, do they see a light-extinguishing black hole where a beautiful image of God should be?

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Posted in EASTER, Hard-Identity Catholicism, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, WDTPRS | Tagged , , | 14 Comments