CQ CQ CQ – Ham Radio Saturday

To all you Hams out there, some news.

I decided the get the General License exam under my belt, so I am studying diligently every day.  I haven’t seen math like this since physics about 30 years ago.

Also, I received recently a Radiogram from a station, perhaps a priest ham’s, in Cincinnati.  I’m not sure what to do with this, or how to respond properly according to good ham usage.  I believe one of you mentioned responding through NTS the last time I got a radiogram, from Harrisburg, PA  Alas, I didn’t.  My bad.  Maybe you hams out there should push me a little and break it down Barney style.

Also, I haven’t yet done anything with Echolink.  Perhaps we should jump start that?

That’s that.

It still have almost no equipment, other than my little YAESU VX8-DR and a whip antenna, which one of you dear readers sent me some time ago from my wish list. I often say a prayer for the sender when I switch it on.

73

UPDATE:

Oh yes… I figured out how to pick up PSK31 with an app on my phone. Rather cool.

11 votes, 3.45 avg. rating (70% score)
FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark
Posted in Ham Radio | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Benedict XVI 10 years ago: “Pray for me…”

My friend Fr. Rutler reminded me today that 10 years ago yesterday, 24 April, Pope Benedict XVI, during his sermon for the beginning of his too brief pontificate, said, among other:

[…]

One of the basic characteristics of a shepherd must be to love the people entrusted to him, even as he loves Christ whom he serves. “Feed my sheep”, says Christ to Peter, and now, at this moment, he says it to me as well. Feeding means loving, and loving also means being ready to suffer. Loving means giving the sheep what is truly good, the nourishment of God’s truth, of God’s word, the nourishment of his presence, which he gives us in the Blessed Sacrament. My dear friends – at this moment I can only say: pray for me, that I may learn to love the Lord more and more. Pray for me, that I may learn to love his flock more and more – in other words, you, the holy Church, each one of you and all of you together. Pray for me, that I may not flee for fear of the wolves. Let us pray for one another, that the Lord will carry us and that we will learn to carry one another.

[…]

I found the FNC coverage of the election (I was on with Chris Wallace and Greg Burke):

I found the video of the Inaugural Mass:

17 votes, 4.29 avg. rating (85% score)
Posted in Benedict XVI, Linking Back | Tagged | 13 Comments

ACTION ITEM! US CLERGY! Sign letter urging Synod to uphold Catholic teaching on marriage and family!

15_04_25_Credo_priestsYou will recall that hundreds of priests in England signed a letter, published in the Catholic Herald, urging the upcoming Synod to uphold Catholic doctrine and discipline concerning marriage and the family.  HERE

That letter created a stir.

I now see that there is an American initiative for Catholic priests to sign a similar letter!

HERE

Signers, be patient.  It seems that your names will not post automatically.  I think that someone must verify the names, which is a good idea.  There will be a delay.

Lay people, please let your priests know about this initiative and ask them to sign it.  Tell them you’ll be watching the list.

I urge all the priestly readers to sign this letter.  I have.

To the Synod Fathers:

In union with our brother priests in the United Kingdom (conforming to the teachings summarized in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1650-51), we make our own the petition they signed urging the Synod Fathers in the upcoming Synod to stand firm on the Church’s traditional understanding of marriage, human sexuality and pastoral practices:

Following the Extraordinary Synod of Bishops in Rome in October 2014 much confusion has arisen concerning Catholic moral teaching. In this situation we wish, as Catholic priests, to re-state our unwavering fidelity to the traditional doctrines regarding marriage and the true meaning of human sexuality, founded on the Word of God and taught by the Church’s Magisterium for two millennia.

We commit ourselves anew to the task of presenting this teaching in all its fullness, while reaching out with the Lord’s compassion to those struggling to respond to the demands and challenges of the Gospel in an increasingly secular society. Furthermore we affirm the importance of upholding the Church’s traditional discipline regarding the reception of the sacraments, and the millennial conviction that doctrine and practice remain firmly and inseparably in harmony.

We urge all those who will participate in the second Synod in October 2015 to make a clear and firm proclamation of the Church’s unchanging moral teaching, so that confusion may be removed, and faith confirmed.

Yours faithfully,

Signed:

The priests are listed over there.  So far there are 2 bishops and 119 priests at the time of this posting, but I imagine there is a long queue.

Heh heh… the person doing the verification is about to get an avalanche.

Fr. Z Kudos and ¡Hagan lío!

UPDATE: 

We need a #hashtag for twitter.

#USPriests2Synod

UPDATE 24 April 2311 GMT:

Priests 191
Bishops 2

 

8 votes, 3.50 avg. rating (71% score)
Posted in ACTION ITEM!, Fr. Z KUDOS, Mail from priests, One Man & One Woman, Our Catholic Identity, Priests and Priesthood, Si vis pacem para bellum!, The Coming Storm, ¡Hagan lío! | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

WDTPRS 3rd Sunday after Easter (1962MR): Be distinguished by your profession of Christ!

This Sunday’s Collect survived the knives of the liturgical experts and was inserted into the 1970 Missale Romanum on the 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time. The redactors who glued the Novus Ordo together, however, removed the word iustitiae, thus returning it to the form it had in the ancient Gelasian Sacramentary. Other ancient sacramentaries, such as the Liber sacramentorum Gellonensis as well as the Augustodunensis had the iustitiae. In any event, by the time St. Pius V issued the the Missale Romanum of 1570, which I am sure you have on hand, someone had seen fit to make it read, “in viam possint redire iustitiae”, which endured until the 1970MR and subsequent editions.

COLLECT (1962MR):

Deus, qui errantibus, ut in viam possint redire iustitiae, veritatis tuae lumen ostendis, da cunctis qui christiana professione censentur, et illa respuere, quae huic inimica sunt nomini, et ea quae sunt apta sectari.

Stylistically snappy! It has nice alliteration and a powerful rhythm in the last line. I think there is a trace here of John 14, which I will show you below. Can we also find a connection between this Collect in a phrase from the Roman statesman Cassiodorus (+c. 585 – consul in 514 and then Boethius’ successor as magister officiorum under the Ostrogothic King Theodoric)? Cassiodorus wrote, “Sed potest aliquis et in via peccatorum esse et ad viam iterum redire iustitiae? … But can someone be both in the way of sins and also return again to the way of justice?” (cf. Exp. Ps. 13). Is this prayer old enough to have been known by Milan’s mighty Bishop St. Ambrose (+397) or even St. Augustine of Hippo (+430), who use similar patterns of words?

Your thorough Lewis & Short Dictionary says censeo has a special construction: censeo, censeri aliqua re, meaning “to be appreciated, distinguished, celebrated for some quality”, “to be known by something.” This explains the passive form in our Collect with the ablative christiana professione. Getting christiana professio into English requires some fancy footwork. We could say “Christian profession”, but this adjectival construction really means “profession of Christ.” This same thing happens in phrases such as oratio dominica, “the Lordly Prayer”, or more smoothly “the Lord’s Prayer”.

Via means, “a way, method, mode, manner, fashion, etc., of doing any thing, course”. There is a moral content to via as well, “the right way, the true method, mode, or manner”.

Let’s see what people used to hear in church on the 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time in the…

OBSOLETE ICEL (1973):

God our Father,
your light of truth
guides us to the way of Christ.
May all who follow him
reject what is contrary to the gospel.

And now, ….

LITERAL RENDERING:

O God, who do show the light of Your truth to the erring so that they might be able to return unto the way of justice, grant to all who are distinguished by their profession of Christ that they may both strongly reject those things which are inimical to this name of Christian and follow eagerly the things which are suited to it.

CURRENT ICEL (2011):

O God, who show the light of your truth
to those who go astray,
so that they may return to the right path,
give all who for the faith they profess
are accounted Christians
the grace to reject whatever is contrary to the name of Christ
and to strive after all that does it honor.

Ancient philosophers (the word comes from Greek for “lover of wisdom”) would walk about in public in their sandals and draped toga-like robes. Thinker such as Aristotle were called “Peripatetics” from their practice of walking about (Greek peripatein) under covered walkways of the Lyceum in Athens (Greek peripatos) while teaching. Their disciples would swarm around them, hanging on their words, debating with them, learning how to think and reason. They would discuss the deeper questions the human mind and heart inevitably faces. They were effectively theologians. We must be careful not to impose the modern divorce of philosophy from theology on the ancients. In ancient Christian mosaics Christ is sometimes depicted wearing a philosopher’s robes. But He doesn’t merely love Wisdom, He is Wisdom incarnate, the perfect Teacher!

He is the one from whom we learn about God and about ourselves (cf. Gaudium et spes 22 – which the young Pope John Paul II helped to write during the Council).

The Collect also reminds me of the very first lines of the Divine Comedy by the exiled Florentine poet Dante Alighieri (+1321) who was heavily influenced by Aristotle’s Ethics and the Christianized Platonic philosophy mediated through Boethius (+525) and St. Thomas Aquinas (+1274). The Inferno begins:

Midway in the journey of our life
I came to myself in a dark wood,
for the straight way was lost.
Ah, how hard it is to tell
the nature of that wood, savage, dense, and harsh –
the very thought of it renews my fear!
It is so bitter death is hardly more so.

Dante, the protagonist of his own poem, is describing his fictional self. In his poetic persona, Dante is in the middle of his life (35 years old – half of 70, the number of years mentioned as man’s span in Ps. 90:10). He is mired in sin and irrational behavior, having strayed from the straight path of the life of reason: he is in the “dark wood”.

The life of persistent sin is a life without true reason. Human reason, when left to itself without the light of grace, is crippled.

Dante likens his confused state to death. He must journey through hell and the purification of purgatory in order to come back to the life of virtue and reason. In the course of the three-part Comedy the Poet finds the proper road back to light, Truth and reason through the intercession of Christ-like figures, such as Beatrice, and then through Christ Himself. In the Comedy, Dante recovers the use of reason. His whole person is reintegrated through the light of Truth.

Don’t we often describe people who are ignorant, confused or obtuse as “wandering around in the dark”? This applies also to persistent sinners. By their choices and resistance to God’s grace they have lost the light of Truth. God’s grace makes it possible for us to find our way back into the right path, no matter how far from it we have strayed in the past. When we sin, we break our relationship with Christ. If in laziness we should refuse to know Him better (every day), we lose sight of ourselves and our neighbor.

Christ, the incarnate Word, gives us consolation:

“‘Let not your hearts be troubled; believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many rooms; if it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And when I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also. And you know the way (via) where I am going.’ Thomas said to him, ‘Lord, we do not know where you are going; how can we know the way (via)?’ Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way (via), and the truth (veritas), and the life (vita); no one comes to the Father, but by me. If you had known me, you would have known my Father also; henceforth you know him and have seen him…. He who has seen me has seen the Father’” (cf. John 14:1-6 RSV).

We Catholics, who dare – DARE - publicly to take Christ’s name to ourselves, need to stand up and be counted (censentur)!

In what we say and do other people ought to be able to see Christ’s light reflected and focused in the details of our individual vocations. To be good lenses and reflectors of Christ’s light, we must be clean. When we know ourselves not to be so, we are obliged as soon as possible to seek cleansing so that we can be saved and be of benefit for the salvation of others. We must also practice spiritual works of mercy, bringing the light of truth to the ignorant or those who persist in darkness either through their own fault or no fault of their own.

Every Catholic is called to evangelize, if not in an “official” capacity in the Church’s name, at least through the obligation we have as members of Christ’s Body the Church.

Evangelization and the efforts of ecumenism are an obligation for every Catholic.  There are still people living in darkness. We must “preach” always and, as the phrase often attributed to St. Francis of Assisi says, sometimes use words.

When people look at us and listen to us, do they see a light-extinguishing black hole where a beautiful image of God should be?

12 votes, 4.42 avg. rating (87% score)
Posted in EASTER, Hard-Identity Catholicism, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, WDTPRS | Tagged , , | 14 Comments

Wherein Fr. Z is, again, in a SciFi novel

I received a note yesterday from Catholic blogger Jeff Miller of The Curt Jester.

So I am reading through John C. Wright‘s new book and I came across this.

In a Basilica on the moon in A.D. 11049:

“A motto picked out in gold letters said in Latin: SAY THE  BLACK, DO THE RED .” A phrase from Father Z.

It’s nice to be quoted.  And in words of gold!

A sure fire way to get mentioned on a blog with nearly a million page views a month.  I’ll add it to my wish list.

I wonder if I have perhaps a second career possibility as a bit character in science fiction?

You might recall that I was a player in the rollicking fun books by Chris Kennedy.  HERE

And, I have been told, there is a chance that I might be resurrected.

19 votes, 3.26 avg. rating (66% score)
Posted in Lighter fare, Linking Back | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

Feedback and a confessional story

confession-731x1024From a reader…

I went to confession! It had been 10 years. Your encouragement helped me get up the nerve to go. The hardest part was actually going to the church. I wrote down every single thing I wanted to say (including “Bless me Father…”). That helped. Your work is helping save souls.

*sniff*

My work here is done.

NOT!

Everyone…

GO TO CONFESSION!

When is the last time you heard those incredible words of absolution after a good, thorough confession of all mortal sins in kind and number?

29 votes, 4.55 avg. rating (90% score)
Posted in Fr. Z KUDOS, GO TO CONFESSION, Reader Feedback | Tagged , , , , | 11 Comments

Notes on Eucharistic Prayer II

Every once in the while, when I was saying the Novus Ordo far more often than I do today (last Sunday was the first in several months, after the EF and before an EF baptism), why I used the Roman Canon and never Eucharistic Prayer II.

Well!

First, there’s the fact that the claimed origins of EP2 are thoroughly ridiculous.

And here’s a new wrinkle, from the great Fr. Hunwicke. He has a post at his place (with my emphases):

How to enjoy Eucharistic Prayer II

That charismatic writer and teacher of the 1950s and 1960s, the distinguished liturgist Fr Louis Bouyer, in his Memoires [published 2014; I am very gratefully indebted to a kind friend for these extracts], tells of his own involvement with the composition of Eucharistic Prayer II.

He [Bouyer] was summoned to join the sub-commission charged with inventing the new ‘Missal'; after seeing the drafting work aleady done, his instinct was to leave the group instantly … but Dom Bernard Botte persuaded him to stay, even if only to obtain a less dreadful result. He agreed. I give you my own probably inaccurate translation [corrections welcomed with a sigh of relief] of Bouyer’s vivid account of the early history of what has, so very sadly, become by far the most commonly used Eucharistic Prayer during this past half-century in the Western Church.

“You’ll have an idea of the deplorable conditions in which this indecently speedy reform (reforme a la sauvette) was pushed forward, when I have told you how the Second Eucharistic Prayer was tied up (ficelee). Between the fanatics who were archaeologising wildly and at random, who would have wanted to ban the Sanctus and the Intercessions from the EP, adopting the Eucharist of Hippolytus just as it was, and the others who didn’t give a damn about (qui se fichaient pas mal de) his pretended Apostolic Tradition but only wanted a botched (baclee) Mass, Dom Botte and I were charged with patching up the text so as to introduce these elements, which are certainly very ancient … in time for the very next morning! By chance, I discovered, in a writing perhaps by Hippolytus himself but certainly in his style, a happy formula on the Holy Spirit which could make a transition, of the Vere Sanctus type, leading into the brief epiclesis. Botte, for his part, fabricated an intercession more worthy of Paul Reboux [a belle epoque humourist and producer of witty pastiches] and his In the Style of … than of his own areas of academic competence. But I can never reread this weird (invraisemblable) composition without recalling the terrace of the bistro in the Trastevere where we had to work carefully at our allotted drudgery (pensum), so as to be in a position to present ourselves, with it in our hands, at the Bronze Gate at the time fixed by our bosses.” [Botte recalls in his memoires that the Pensionato in which he stayed was too full of red, purple, and cassocks; “my only break was to eat my meals in the little public restaurants on the nearby streets …”]

[… Here I’ve cut out a highly amusing chunk to force you to go over there and read the rest….]

The next paragraph begins with Bouyer informing us that the Novus Ordo Calendar was “oeuvre d’un trio de maniaques”. He also describes Archbishop Bugnini as meprisable and aussi depourvu de culture que de simple honnetete, all of which really does totally defeat either my schoolboy French or my plain old-style Anglo-Saxon sense of decency de mortuis; I’m not sure which. It’s such a terrible burden being an Englishman.

Mémoires Louis BouyerI’ll be heading to Rome in May for some research.  I must get this book.  I don’t see it yet on Amazon USA in French.  It is available at Amazon UK (HERE) and at Amazon ITALY (HERE), at Amazon CANADA (HERE) and of course Amazon FRANCE (HERE).

Let’s have a couple POLLS about the Eucharistic Prayers you usually here.

Pick the answer that best describes your situation.  Feel free to use the combox to elaborate.

Anyone can vote in both polls,  but you have to be registered to comment.

At Ordinary Form Mass on Sundays and holy days...

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

At Ordinary Form Mass on Sundays and holy days

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
23 votes, 3.61 avg. rating (72% score)
Posted in Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, POLLS | Tagged , , | 57 Comments

Another morsel for #TalkLikeShakespeare Day

Today my Word of the Day from the OED is

honorificabilitudinity, n.

[‘ Honourableness.’]

Pronunciation: Brit. /ˌɒnəˌrɪfᵻkəˌbɪlᵻtjuːˈdɪnᵻti/, U.S. /ˌɑnəˌrɪfᵻkəˌbɪlᵻt(j)uˈdɪnᵻdi/

Etymology: <  post-classical Latin honorificabilitudinitas honourableness (13th cent. in British and continental sources) <  honorificabilitudin-honorificabilitudo honourableness (in a charter of 1187 in Du Cange; <  honorificabilis honourable (7th cent.; <  honorificare honorify v. + classical Latin -bilis -ble suffix) + classical Latin -t?d? -tude suffix) + classical Latin -it?s -ity suffix.

In a number of texts from the 16th and 17th centuries the Latin ablative plural honorificabilitudinitatibus is cited as an example of a very long word: compare Complaynt of Scotland (1548–9), Prolog. lf. 14 b, Shakespeare Love’s Labours Lost (1598) v. i. 41 (see quot. 1598 at head n.1 1b(a)), and Marston Dutch Courtezan (1605) v. H. The Latin form honorificabilitudinitate (ablative singular) is similarly mentioned in Dante De Vulgari Eloquentia (c1305) ii. vii.  [And we get some Dante as a bonus!]

Compare the following example of the Latin word in an English context:

1599  T. Nashe Lenten Stuffe 24 Physitions deafen our eares with the Honorificabilitudinitatibus of their heauenly Panachæa their soueraigne Guiacum. Honourableness.
Now rare in regular usage, but freq. cited as an example of an unusually long word, or (incorrectly) as the longest word in the English language. Sometimes with reference to Shakespeare’s use of the Latin word (see etymology).

1656  T. Blount GlossographiaHonorificabilitudinity, honorableness. [Also in later dictionaries].

1785  T. Holcroft Choleric Fathers ii. 38 This vast honorificabilitudinity Commands my esteem!

1800  in Spirit of Public Jrnls. (1801) 4 147 The two longest monosyllables in our language are strength and straight, and the very longest word, honorificabilitudinity.

1823  J. Lunn Horæ Jocosæ 43 No honorificabilitudinity Or wealth could suffice To content her.

1908 Denver Med. Times & Utah Med. Jrnl. Jan. 345 Long words (of which the longest is honorificabilitudinity, latinized by Shakespeare).

2005 Province (Vancouver, Brit. Columbia) (Nexis) 15 Mar. a20 Students might consider the old-fashioned spelling bee as nothing more than floccinaucinihilipilification. Well, we see it more as an act of honorificabilitudinity.

In the aforementioned play there is one of the Bard’s famous quotes, followed by the WOTD in question:

MOTH:

[Aside to COSTARD] They have been at a great feast
of languages, and stolen the scraps.

COSTARD:

O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word;
for thou art not so long by the head as
honorificabilitudinitatibus: thou art easier
swallowed than a flap-dragon.

Talk Like Shakespeare at least once today.

Flap DragonBTW… “flap-dragon” was a game played in Shakespeare’s day. If you want to play at home, you’ll also need a fire extinguisher, ice, and ointments. Put heated brandy in a bowl with raisins and set the liquid on fire. Turn off the lights. Take turns plucking the raisins from the flaming booze! Fun for all! This game is also mentioned in Henry IV Part II (which the DVD is languishing on my wish list, as Preserved Killick would add):

FALSTAFF:

Because their legs are both of a bigness, and a’
plays at quoits well, and eats conger and fennel,
and drinks off candles’ ends for flap-dragons, and
rides the wild-mare with the boys, and jumps upon
joined-stools, and swears with a good grace, and
wears his boots very smooth, like unto the sign of
the leg, and breeds no bate with telling of discreet
stories; and such other gambol faculties a’ has,
that show a weak mind and an able body, for the
which the prince admits him: for the prince himself
is such another; the weight of a hair will turn the
scales between their avoirdupois.

Ehem.

Yes.

12 votes, 3.42 avg. rating (69% score)
Posted in Just Too Cool, Lighter fare, O'Brian Tags, Preserved Killick | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Thanks to readers, monthly donations, Mass for benefactors

A quick word of thanks to readers who have sent donations or wish list items.  I will say Mass for the intention of benefactors tomorrow Friday, 24 April.

Oremus pro benefactoribus nostris.  Retribuere dignare, Domine, omnibus nobis bona facientibus propter nomen tuum vitam aeternam.  Amen.*

I am grateful when donations come in, either ad hoc (one offs) or on a regular, monthly basis through the subscription option (at the bottom of the blog).  I keep track of everyone’s name and remember them in my prayers and in intentions for Holy Mass.  It is important that we remember our benefactors in prayer.

That said,  I note that for this day of the month, the 23rd, only 3 people were signed up.  Today there was a new subscriber, SV. He made it 4.  Thanks SV!

Some days of the month have quite a few regular subscribers signed up and other days very few.  Today is one of those “lean” days for the blog.

If you are using the blog regularly, please consider subscribing today to send a monthly donation. That way you also wind up regularly on my list of benefactors for whom I pray and for whom I periodically say Holy Mass.  This is my duty and my pleasure.

Some options

 

*BTW… did you know that there is an indulgence available for praying for benefactors? It is in the Enchridion Indulgentiarum conc. 24:

Preces pro benefactoribus

Partialis indulgentia conceditur christifideli qui, supernaturali grati animi affectu ductus, orationem pro benefactoribus legitime adprobatam pie recitaverit (e. g. Retribuere dignare, Domine).

Retribuere dignare, Domine, omnibus nobis bona facientibus propter nomen tuum vitam aeternam. Amen.

12 votes, 3.00 avg. rating (61% score)
Posted in SESSIUNCULA | Leave a comment

A curious lacuna in ‘Misericordiae vultus’, the Bull for the Holy Year of Mercy

From a reader…

QUAERITUR:

Today I was reading Misericordiae vultus and noticed that, in section 15 on the Works of Mercy, [Pope Francis] gives both full lists of 7 works, and then goes on to expand on all 7 of the Corporal Works but only 6 of the Spiritual.

The Spiritual Work he doesn’t expand on is “admonish the sinner.”

I’ve checked the English, Latin, Spanish, and Italian versions online to make sure one clause didn’t just drop out accidentally. Not there in any of them.

Thoughts on this?

Sure.  I have thoughts about this.  But I can only speculate.

It’s a no brainer, for a Year of Mercy, to urge people to practice the all the Corporal and all the Spiritual Works of Mercy.  All of them, and not just the easy ones.  Right?

Perhaps someone should ask Fr. Lombardi.

The moderation queue is ON.

23 votes, 4.09 avg. rating (81% score)
Posted in Pope Francis, The Drill | Tagged , , , | 52 Comments