A visit to WISCONSIN!

After the very nice Missa cantata with the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite this morning at St. Benedict’s Chapel, wherein yours truly was celebrant, (sorry, no photos… I was busy) I was priviledged to have a visit to the great battleship WISCONSIN, moored in downtown Norfolk. 

The ship in on inactive reserve in case it is needed.   WI last saw service in the Gulf war. 

 

WISCONSIN is an Iowa-class Battleship, second of that name, launched in 1943.  She has gorgeous lines.  They just don’t make ships that look this graceful anymore.

She served in WWII and Korea and was then mothballed.  She was revived for the Gulf War, and her huge turrets educated Iraqi targets.

 

Numerically, BB-64 is the highest numbered ship of her class, even though she was completed before the USS MISSOURI.

BB-64’s main battery had nine 16 inch (406 mm) guns, which could hurl 2,700 lb (1,200 kg) around 24 miles (39 km). As a backup she had twenty 5 inch (127 mm) guns in ten turrets which could hit targets 9 miles (14 km) away.

In case of a national emergency, BB-64 could be rapidly refitted and returned to active service for her incredible firepower. 

FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in My View, SESSIUNCULA. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to A visit to WISCONSIN!

  1. Outstanding! I, too, have toured this ship — she arrived in Norfolk when my father was stationed in Virginia.

  2. Brian C. says:

    Ah, phooey, Father…! I saw the title, and I got all excited (being a Wisconsin resident), only to learn that you were talking about a battleship (albeit a noble one)! (*sigh*) Hopes dashed, offered up, a few more souls out of Purgatory… :)

    Fr. Joseph Redfern says “hello”, by the way!

    In Christ,
    Brian

  3. Fr. Michael says:

    Fr. Z wrote:

    “….her huge turrets educated Iraqi targets.”

    Educated????

    I’m so poorly educated myself. I’ve never seen that word used this way. Could you explain, please?

  4. Andy says:

    Ditto Brian C!

  5. Christopher says:

    Oh dear, it appears that Fr. Z has struck a nerve:

    “How does this statement of bellicose nationalism square with the the memory of Jesus the Christ, a memory preserved by the Church? How does It square with the passionate anti-war message laid out by the same John Paul in Centesimus Annus? How does it square with the notion that war is always a failure and something to mourn, given it is last resort? How does it square by recent Vatican statements on war? It doesn’t. He is bowing before an idol, an idol of the nation state, an idol of war. And that holds whether I say it in English or Latin, by the way.”

    http://vox-nova.com/2008/04/13/nationalist-priests/

  6. Tiago says:

    That sounds really great, Father!
    In my first comment ever, I would like to give you a hint: go to Patriot’s Point, in Charleston, South Carolina.
    I was there while I was an Exchange Student (I’m Brazilian!). Great place, I think you would like it:
    USS Yorktown, aircraft carrier (WWII)
    USCGC Ingham, from Coast Guard
    USS Lafey (WWII, I think it was hit my kamikazes, if I’m not mistaken!)
    And Clamagore, a cool WWII submarine!
    I miss that place very much, and thought you would really want to be there, haha!

  7. Sara says:

    I was assigned with the US Air Force in Doha, Qatar during the Gulf War…and got to see first-hand a couple of months later in Kuwait City the “education” they received…we could hear the battleships pounding their assigned targets at the time but had no real comprehension of the damage.. my hat off to the US Navy!!

  8. Greg says:

    Yes, it is beautiful, and I am grateful for these ships – but they fill me with dread every time I see them. Perhaps that’s the idea.

  9. Elise B. says:

    Is it proper for a priest to glorify a warship used to kill people? The paragraph quoted by Christopher would seem more in order. Perhaps it is because I am not a US American, it always bother me to see US Catholics so fond of guns and war.

  10. MG says:

    I am grateful for your pictures. I’ve never seen a battleship, and appreciate your online tour! I’m sure you, as I (when looking at the pictures and reading your descriptions)and many others, have said a prayer of thanks for all (past qand present) who have served on these ships. God Bless and protect each and every them.
    Thanks again for keeping us updated on your trip. God Bless you and your work.

  11. MG says:

    I’m grateful for your pictures. I’ve never seen a battleship, and appreciate your online tour! I’m sure you, as I (when looking at the pictures and reading your descriptions)and many others, have said a prayer of thanks for all (past qand present) who have served on these ships. God Bless and protect each and every them.

    Thanks again for keeping us updated on your trip. God Bless you; continued safe travel.

  12. Christopher says:

    More about the ship — quite an impressive history, from battling the Japanese in the Pacific to taking on the Iraqis in the U.S. liberation of Kuwait from Saddam Hussein.

    http://www.usswisconsin.org/General/Ships%20History.htm

  13. shane says:

    VERY COOL!

    I LOVE the Iowa class battleships. Father i envy you!

  14. Some people might think my enthusiasm for seeing the aircraft carrier or this battleship smack of nationalism or being bellicose.

    Silly.

    I do not apologize for being an American or proud of of my country, which pulled many other peoples’ fat out of the fire with the blood of her soldiers, sailors and marines.

    Pope Benedict in his first Message for the World Day of Peace pointed out the importance of military intervention at times to establish the proper framework for true peace.

    There it is!