Music lineup for Mass at Yankee Stadium

Here is the music line up for the Mass at Yankee Stadium: 

Symphony No. 9 in D minor – Ludwig van Beethoven
I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso
II. Molto vivace

Entrance of the Holy Father
Hymnus Pontificius – Charles Gounod, arr. Alberico Vitalini
Dixit from Vesperae Solennes de Confessore – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Music for Mass
Jesus is Risen/ Cristo Jesús Resucitó – arr. John Rutter
Tu es Petrus – Dom Lorenzo Perosi
Kyrie, from Litany of the Saints – adapt. Richard Proulx
Gloria, from Missa O Magnum Mysterium – Tomás Luis da Victoria
Psalm – Dr. Jennifer Pascual
Alleluia (VICTORY) – arr. Wm. Glenn Osborne
Credo III
Trilingual Intercessions – Michael Hay, orch. Wm. Glenn Osborne
How Lovely is thy Dwelling Place – Johannes Brahms
Sanctus from German Mass – Franz Schubert, adapt. Richard Proulx
Christ Has Died/ Amen – Franz Schubert, adapt. Richard Proulx
Agnus Dei from Missa O Magnum Mysterium – Tomás Luis da Victoria
Panis Angelicus – Cesár Franck, Marcello Giordani, Tenor, Metropolitan Opera
Sicut Cervus – Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina [One of Fr. Z's favorites]
Ave Verum – Alexandre Guilmant, orch. Deborah Jamini
Amén. El Cuerpo de Cristo – John Schiavonne, orch. Carl Maultsby
Let Us Break Bread Together – arr. Carl Maultsby
This is the Feast – Richard Hillert, arr. Richard Kidd
Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee/ Jubilosos te Adoramos – from Hymn to Joy Fantasy – Bruce Saylor

Symphony No. 9 in D minor – Ludwig van Beethoven
IV. Presto 

Not bad!

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31 Responses to Music lineup for Mass at Yankee Stadium

  1. TNCath says:

    It sure beats Washington!

  2. Justin says:

    Ahh.. The Missa O Magnum Mysterium by Victoria.

    Beats the Mass of Creation any day!

  3. FloridaJohn says:

    I was at Yankee Stadium as a young news person when Paul VI celebrated Mass there; I was an assisting deacon at John Paul II’s Mass at Aqueduct Race Track in Queens, NY; I will be spiritually, through EWTN, at Benedict XVI Mass Sunday. In these 50 years, this is the best music line-up ever! Thanks for posting it, Fr. Z!

  4. Emilio says:

    What a difference, oh heaven, what a difference! I’m happy that the Holy Father will leave with hopefuly impressions concerning Divine Worship in this country, if indeed he would have been distressed by the travesty of Thursday morning in DC.

  5. Christine says:

    Much better than the cacophony heard at Nationals Stadium.

  6. Victor says:

    Agreed to everything, except: Do you realize the text of the last movement of Beethoven’s 9th symphony is masonic in nature and intent? I just don’t know if this is appropriate for a mass…

  7. An American Mother says:

    More excellent music.

    (“Sicut Cervus” is a fave at our parish too. We sing it often. Of course, there’s so much other beautiful Palestrina to sing. And then there’s Victoria, and Byrd, and Tallis . . . . )

    The Brahms is particularly beautiful, quite a contrast with the Renaissance polyphony. Sort of the same contrast provided by the Biebl at St. Patrick’s.

  8. Volpius says:

    That’s ok Victor it’s not your decision.

  9. senorverde says:

    To me, not just “not bad” — fantastic. Wish I could be there.

    Does anyone have information about the conductor/choir director in charge of these selections, and the choirs which will be performing them? Especially maybe an email address or regular address where we could contact them and show our support?

    As a veteran of many choirs who performed this type of music, it’s no small thing to prepare and perform this stuff. One of the tangible things that all of us who care about the state of the liturgy today can do is to give direct positive reinforcement to them if at all possible. We need to let them know how much the Church needs and appreciates what they have worked so hard to offer!

  10. An American Mother says:

    Victor, there’s been some speculation that Schiller was a Freemason, but there’s no record of it, and he denied it himself.

    The text of An die Freude probably owes more to the general social ferment of the 1780s than to Freemasonry. And as C.S. Lewis once said, you can go far wrong trying to guess at the motivations of a writer.

  11. An American Mother says:

    senorverde, it’s my understanding that the music was selected by Dr. Jennifer Pascual, the organist/music director at St. Patrick’s, in consultation with Cardinal Egan.

    I would think you would be able to reach her at the Cathedral website.

    And I absolutely agree she and the choirs deserve props and praise! They have done a magnificent job.

  12. tradforlife says:

    A little known fact.

    The music director at St. Patrick’s ( and for all of the NY papal litrugy ) directed for a traditional latin mass community in her formal life. Several of her selections were ones that she directed during high masses for the old rite.

  13. senorverde says:

    Thanks, American Mother, that’s great.

    I found this on the website, in case anyone else is with me here:

    Jennifer Pascual, DMA
    Director of Music

    Donald Dumler
    Principal Organist

    Robert M. Evers
    Music Administrator
    musicdept@saintpatrickscathedral.org

    …looks like they’re all under the same email address, or something like that.

    By the way, EWTN is re-broadcasting the mass right now if anyone is free to watch — they’re doing the Palestrina Ego Sum right now…[crossing fingers that the replay includes NO commentary in the middle of the song]…

  14. senorverde says:

    ….D’oh! not again. Rats.

  15. Victor says:

    From the German Wikipedia “Ode an die Freude” (translation by me, so my apologies in advance):
    “Schiller was friends with freemason Christian Gottfried Körner, who later compiled a complete edition of Schiller’s works from 1812 to 1816. At his request he wrote during the summer of 1785 the ode “to joy” for the freemason’s lodge “three swords” in Dresden.”
    Even without knowing this, a careful reading of the text shows that the God praised in the Ode is “the Unknown”, “He who sits above the stars” etc. So, still: beautiful music, no doubt, but not really suitable for Holy Mass.

  16. John Polhamus says:

    Wow, what a difference from the Washington debacle. Oh, and being a professional baritone, choir director for both forms of the Roman Rite, and organist in a Novus Ordo parish, I did leave a series of three “reflections” on the USCCB blogsite for the Washington Mass, and sure enough, they were all three deleted. Albeit they were pretty direct. But this this lineup is most respectable. Viva Vittoria! Viva Papa Benedicto XVI!

  17. Victor says:

    A part of my post was edited out by me. It should have said:
    …”He who sits above the stars” etc., in other words, not God the Father of Jesus Christ who came into this world, but a Deistic God who created the world but has no further involvement with it. So, still:…

  18. John Polhamus says:

    Wow, what a difference from the Washington debacle. Oh, and being a professional baritone, choir director for both forms of the Roman Rite, and organist in a Novus Ordo parish, I did leave a series of three “reflections” on the USCCB blogsite for the Washington Mass, and sure enough, they were all three deleted. Albeit they were pretty direct. But this this lineup is most respectable. Viva Vittoria! Viva Papa Benedicto XVI!

    Victor, Beethoven’s music was played before and after mass, not during. I think we can all make the mental leap.

  19. TJM says:

    The music selections (other than the ones that are thrown in for pander purposes) are absolutely splendid and a definite cut above those featured at the Donnie Wuerle variety show in DC. John Polhamus, I too left a highly complimentary remark about the St. Patrick’s liturgy, saying it helped me pray better and wished I could enjoy such wonderful, Catholic music in my parish, and the censor deleted it. I seem to recall that the person in charge of USCCB is a woman and a pro-abortion type. If my recollection is accurate, could there be an “agenda” and a connection? Tom

  20. RBrown says:

    Agreed to everything, except: Do you realize the text of the last movement of Beethoven’s 9th symphony is masonic in nature and intent? I just don’t know if this is appropriate for a mass…
    Comment by Victor

    In what way is it masonic in nature and intent?

    IMHO, the last movement of the 9th is the weak link of an otherwise superb piece of music. The first two movements are astounding genius, and some think the violins in the very beginning Beethoven is reproducing his tinnitus.

    The only time I have ever liked hearing the last movement was when I saw the Ninth performed at the Beethoven Hall in Bonn.

  21. RBrown says:

    and some think the violins in the very beginning Beethoven is reproducing his tinnitus.

    should be:

    and some think that violins in the very beginning of the 1st movement are Beethoven reproducing his tinnitus.

  22. Justin says:

    Director of Music, Dr Jennifer Pascual’s e-mail according to one of the Organists websites is DrJPascual@aol.com

  23. Hoka2_99 says:

    The list looks much more promising than what we heard in Washington, but anything would be an improvement on that. I’m a bit concerned about the Panis Angelicus solo again – hope it won’t be another “performance”.

    At today’s Mass there was a solo tenor belting out something loudly [in my ignorance I didn't recognise it] during the Communion, but luckily there was no applause. Though the Mass in Saint Patrick’s was a tremendous improvement on the Washington effort, I still feel rather uncertain. As I wrote in an earlier post, is this just because I’m so used to the European Masses?

  24. Justin says:

    I’m watching the USCCB livefeed now from Yonkers – the pre-youth rally – and they’re now singing Gregorian chant – Kyrie from De Angelis!!

  25. tradforlife says:

    Hoka2_99 Said: “..I’m a bit concerned about the Panis Angelicus solo again – hope it won’t be another “performance”.

    It depends on how it’s done. Franck’s Panis Angelicus can be arranged so that the choir echoes the soloist. It can be very pretty when done right.

    I wouldn’t feel comfortable about any liturgy that is arranged by those in charge of the American Catholic church. We’ll have to wait and see.

    It’s too bad that nobody took the hint when Benedict XVI entitled the old mass the extraordinary rite. Since this visit is an extraordinary event there should have been liturgy that suited such an occasion.

    Maybe that’s what the liturgists for the Washington mass were trying to accomplish. It’s too bad nobody bothered to read Summorum Pontificum so they could understand what the holy father meant by extraordinary.

    I think the last time Benedict XVI said mass at St. Patrick’s it was in the extraordinary form (as Cardinal Ratzinger of course). I wonder if he was thinking about that at any time during the mass.

  26. Berthold says:

    An impressive music selection indeed. There is only one point I (as a Bavarian) am worried about, the Sanctus. Franz Schubert’s ‘German Mass’ is not a normal Mass Setting but a series of hymns to be sung during Low Mass – with beautiful melodies yet very didactic ‘enlightenment’ texts. The Sanctus is probably the best part of it, and in Germany it is still very popular. However, it is shorter than the liturgical ‘Sanctus’, and combining it with the ICEL Sanctus text badly distorts the original melody (This is at least the case by the version normally used in Britain).

  27. “Sicut Cervus – Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina [One of Fr. Z’s favorites]“

    One of mine too. Don’t you just love the way the tenor starts out? So calm and serene, you can almost hear the waterbrook that is the object of longing in the psalm, starting as a single stream from the rock, and gushing through the meadow into the many voices of serenity…. you get the idea, right, Padre?

    At least the Holy Father will get the idea. Oh to be a fly on the wall for that post-game wrap-up.

  28. Denis Crnkovic says:

    But, of course, the real problem is that there is very little integration here between the liturgy and the music. In an ideal world a Mass composed of this hodgepodge of musical forms would be considered substandard. Altough I agree that the music is, in and of itself, much, much better than the unworthy schlock heard at Washington, the inconsistency here still reflects how far music at the Catholic Mass in America has to go. Each individual piece has its worth, but there is no sense of integration among the pieces themselves. This still looks like a Mass whose music was planned by those who have a sense of good taste, but know little about the cohesion of compatible musical styles and forms. It’s like a pot luck dinner where all the food is excellent, but the dishes do not compliment each other. A hearty Tokay furmint with sushi…

    Perhaps I am being strident. I just came from an Orthodox Chrismation ceremony in which the music was excellently well coordinated and the liturgy therefore splendid – I might even say divine – in its cohesion.

    +

  29. I don’t believe this Mass will be licit or valid; Masses in the United States MUST contain at least one Marty Haugen song. Consuetudo pro lege servatur, right?

    Just kidding!

    I’m really looking forward to this Mass. Hopefully it will be higher watched/covered than the DC circus Mass, and people will get a better impression of the regality of a papal Mass.

  30. dan soderlund says:

    I don’t believe this Mass will be licit or valid; Masses in the United States MUST contain at least one Marty Haugen song. Consuetudo pro lege servatur, right?

    I was just thinking the same thing – except the Mass must contain the “Mount Rushmore” of “American” Catholic music….Haas, Haugen, Joncas, Schutte…to constitute a valid Mass.

    Here is a respectable website that allows you to become a member of the Society for a Moratorium on the Music of Marty Haugen and David Haas http://www.mgilleland.com/music/moratorium.htm

    I don’t see Fr. Z’s name on the list…yet…