How the Office begins

For those who may never have seen it, this is how one starts to pray the Office in the older form. There are variations, but today’s is typical.

With the help of the iBreviary app and in English… a nice way to start any day. “Ant.” is the Antiphon.

Start
V. O Lord ? open thou my lips
R. And my mouth shall declare thy praise.
V. O God ? come to my assistance;
R. O Lord, make haste to help me.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, * and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Alleluia

Invitatory {Antiphona for the Common or Feast}
Ant. The Lord, He is the King of the Confessors. * let us worship Him.
Ant. The Lord, He is the King of the Confessors. * let us worship Him.
Come let us praise the Lord with joy: let us joyfully sing to God our saviour. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving; and make a joyful noise to him with psalms.
Ant. The Lord, He is the King of the Confessors. * let us worship Him.
For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods. For in his hand are all the ends of the earth: and the heights of the mountains are his.
Ant. let us worship Him.
For the sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land. (genuflect) Come let us adore and fall down: and weep before the Lord that made us: For he is the Lord our God: and we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand.
Ant. The Lord, He is the King of the Confessors. * let us worship Him.
Today if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts: As in the provocation, according to the day of temptation in the wilderness: where your fathers tempted me, they proved me, and saw my works.
Ant. let us worship Him.
Forty years long was I offended with that generation, and I said: These always err in heart. And these men have not known my ways: so I swore in my wrath that they shall not enter into my rest.
Ant. The Lord, He is the King of the Confessors. * let us worship Him.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. As it was in the beginning, is now, * and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
Ant. let us worship Him.
Ant. The Lord, He is the King of the Confessors. * let us worship Him.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

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11 Responses to How the Office begins

  1. I pray the Liturgy of the Hours daily, and this is the most beautiful translation of the Invitatory Psalm I have ever read. I’ll have to take a look at the iBreviary app.

  2. this is how one starts to pray the Office in the older form.

    And in the newer from as well. Except that the “O God, come to my assistance; O Lord, make haste to help me.” is omitted from this Invitatory, but used to start each of the subsequent Hours of the day.

  3. piscotikus says:

    When praying alone would one say the antiphons after each verse?

  4. Joel says:

    Question: Why is The Glory Be different in the newer form?

  5. RaisingSaints: The translation above for the invitatory psalm is simply the Douay-Rheims translation of Psalm 94 (95).

    piscotikus: In private recitation, repetition of the invitatory antiphon is optional in the newer form (though not best practice, in my purely personal opinion), but remains standard in the older form.

    Joel: ICEL. But only in the North American edition. It remains in the traditional English form in the British edition of the newer Divine Office used in most of the rest of the English-speaking world.

  6. jrotond2 says:

    I love this iPhone application! It’s indispensable, especially being able to inconspicuously pray the Office at the office (no pun intended).

    Another nice, albeit minor, feature of this application is the ability to turn on and off the “Dominus vobiscum”. So, for us laymen and for anyone praying the Office alone, the application inserts the “Domine, exaudi orationem meam” in place of the “Dominus vobiscum” wherever applicable. Pretty neat.

    One caveat – I have caught a few minor typos (to be expected) but one glaring error was that the Office on July 2 was not corrected to be that of the Visitation instead of the Precious Blood (an error from the Ordo), so the good old fashioned Breviary had to come off the shelf for that day. Also, I wish they would add the Litanies (other than of the Saints), the Penitential Psalms, the Little Office of the BVM and the Office of the Dead to the “Orationes” page.

  7. Augustin57 says:

    Well, I don’t have an iPhone. Is there an app that runs on PC’s that can help one learn the Office? I’ve long felt called to pray the Office daily, but it seems way complicated. I suspect one would have to be trained by someone who knows. (Unless, of course, there’s a neat app some smart, thinking, faithful person wrote.) :)

  8. raitchi2 says:

    @ Augustin57: if your looking for a Liturgy of the Hours app. for PC’s I don’t think there is one (yet). If your looking for the older breviaries (’62 and earlier), you can download an English-Latin translation at http://divinumofficium.com/www/horas/Help/download.html I use this program–it’s great! Open it to the hour and everything you need to say is there.

  9. Augustin57,

    Although I don’t use it personally, the Universalis system for the (newer) Liturgy of the Hours looks good to me. You can go to the home page http://www.universalis.com/ and take a look at today’s hours, which you can use on-line.

    There are downloads of the whole system for off-line use on Windows and Mac, iPhone/iPod/iPad apps and other mobile devices (Blackberry, PalmOS, etc.), e-book formats for Kindle, etc.

  10. jdskyles says:

    Whenever I pray the morning office the section of the psalm:
    “Forty years long was I offended with that generation, and I said: These always err in heart. And these men have not known my ways: so I swore in my wrath that they shall not enter into my rest.”
    always sticks in my head, and I wonder how long have we had to endure bad theology and bad liturgy? Time is almost up I think.

  11. ghp95134 says:

    Forty years long was I offended with that generation, and I said: These always err in heart. And these men have not known my ways: so I swore in my wrath that they shall not enter into my rest.

    Hmmmmm …. I wonder if~~~~

    …..Nah … it couldn’t be.