QUESTION TO READERS: Expanded Pentecost liturgy in the Ordinary Form

A reader has a question for the readership, and I also am interested in the answer:

Is anyone observing the new Ordinary Form extended form of the Vigil of Pentecost, with First Vespers (possibly) and the four OT readings and responsories preceding the Vigil Mass proper–analogous to the Vigil of Easter?

Let us know!

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27 Responses to QUESTION TO READERS: Expanded Pentecost liturgy in the Ordinary Form

  1. In case anyone not having a copy of the new Roman Missal 3e wonders what this is about, the Extended Form of the new (though apparently ancient) Vigil of Pentecost may (or may not) start with the First Vespers of Pentecost, in which case it continues through the psalmody to but not including the Short Reading. Then come four Old Testament readings, each followed with a responsorial psalm and a collect. The Gloria follows these readings, then the rest of the Mass continues through holy communion. If the Vigil has begun with Vespers, then after communion with the Communion Antiphon, the Magnificat is sung with its Vespers antiphon, followed with the Prayer after Communion, and finally the rest as usual.

    In this form, this Vigil of Pentecost at the end of Eastertide would appear to mirror the Vigil of Easter at its beginning.

  2. CJC says:

    My parish is! We’re headed to church soon. The priest made an announcement the previous Sunday that the following Saturday night Mass would be extended because of the restored Pentecost Vigil Mass like Easter Vigil. I’m excited to experience this new/old tradition of the Church!

  3. Bryan Boyle says:

    In my parish…we’re lucky when they wear the right color vestments (blue-highlighted white seems to be an ever present theme on Marian days; solid blue on Immaculate Conception and Assumption…yes, you can’t mistake it for purple…)…never mind worrying about such ‘extra accreations’ such as the Sequence, which the current pastor has NEVER allowed to be proclaimed in the 16 years I’ve been attending this particular parish. Might mean that he has to shorten his 15-minute homily..

    Grrrr….needless to say, the extended celebration is NOT happening at my particular corner of the Diocese of Metuchen.

  4. brotherfee says:

    I will be heading to the Pentecost vigil service shortly. I am one of the two readers, will be reading: Genesis 11:1-9, Ez 37: 1-14, and Rom 8: 22-27, which are readings 1,3 and 5. The choir will be singing the responsorial psalm response between readings, while I am to read the psalm itself using a poetic fashion. I have been working on my diction!

    The other reader will do readings 2 and 4, along with the intersessions. Father will offer a prayer between each of the readings. Looking forward to a great evening.

  5. marcpuckett says:

    Does anyone know where I can read the Latin text of the Missal’s ‘extended form’ of the Pentecost Vigil online?

  6. OrthodoxChick says:

    Just got home and my parish definitely did not. Hardly any religious music at all. At the processional, offertory, and recessional, they played all U.S. songs: My Country Tis of Thee, America the Beautiful, and God Bless America. Tonight, we were sans the old fogie folk band, but instead, we had an organist who didn’t know how to play the Gloria and a lone, female singer who didn’t know how to sing the Gloria. She sang only the refrain and interrupted her own singing to ask us to read the main prayer while she sang the chorus.

    Ugh.

    To think, I’ve only been hangin’ with you folks for a few days and I’m already a disgruntled OF attendee. And I haven’t even made it to my first EF Mass yet. I’m going to try to find one stat because now I feel like I haven’t been to Mass yet this weekend.

  7. wmeyer says:

    OrthodoxChick: Do not be discouraged. Though many parishes have made a mess of the OF, there are some which do a very good job with it. And remember, though the distractions of the innovations may intrude, it is your faith, your reverence, your worship, which you must preserve.

  8. OrthodoxChick says:

    wmeyer,
    Thank you! I’m still on an EF hunt though! I need to find one closer than an hour and change away. I can’t make that kind of commute regularly with current gas prices. My car sits in the driveway unless absolutely necessary as it is. I would love to see us all get together here and brainstorm to develop a campaign to foster a love of the EF. Maybe if more parishoners come to learn about it and value it, more requests will be made to pastors to bring it back.

    What about a web page with Chant playing when visitors go there? With videos of an EF Mass, explanations of the documents that clarify that VII was not supposed to wipe it out, maybe quotes from the Popes and Saints about EF and Chant; translations of the Chants and prayers from Latin to English so people can learn them. And if Fr. Z runs it, maybe he could offer a novel item at that website that you can’t buy here. Say maybe a “Say the Black, do the Red” bracelet (like the kind they have for cancer and other causes)? Then we can all show up to our parish functions wearing them and explaining what they mean. Maybe this blog could be linked to such a website? Oh, an how about an online request, not really a petition because that’s not always perceived charitably, but maybe an online request to the Bishop in each Diocese to support their pastors in learning and saying the EF. Maybe it could be set up so that each visitor to the website could click a map of the U.S. to indicate what state they live in and once on their state page, click their Diocese and then sign the request.

    Just some thoughts off the top of my head but with the year of Faith coming up, perhaps now is the time for all of us to help Fr. Z and make some plans to try to spread the word about his work here even further.

    Anyone else have some ideas or am I the only dreamer in the bunch?

  9. Here is a complete text of the extended form of the Vigil of Pentecost, prepared by Paul Ford of St. John Seminary, Camarillo, CA:

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/7331043/VIGIL%20OF%20PENTECOST%20letter%20size.pdf

  10. The Cobbler says:

    @OrthodoxChick:

    A lot of that actually sounds like this blog… with the exception of the chant playing automatically… (Playing music automatically when you go to the page is considered tacky by web developers because it’s considered “annoying” by most people surfing the web, even if they happen to want to listen to the sort of music the page autoplays. It’s kinda like popup ads — even supposing I wanted to know what was on sale at Walmart, I don’t want it blocking my view without asking.) With that said, I think if you want the EF in your diocese and it’s not already there (or only out in the far reaches geographically), a lot of focus would need to go into convincing people where you’re at both that this is important and that the people who want it aren’t wanting it out of some anti-social tendency (it’s a silly impression some folk get of olden stuff, that those who like it are mean… some are of course because some humans everywhere are, but quite often it’s more that purposely smoothing over meanness is largely a modern fad).

    Of course, I do intend to research the place of chant not only pre-V2 but throughout Church history, along with how the laity are supposed to participate in the Mass, and plug the results into a blog format for more concise reading… if I can find the time. I’m one of those people who throws a lot of focus into one or a few things, so when I get back from my job I don’t tend to have a lot of focus leftover for a project that requires proper study more than wandering around thinking; but if I can manage it… And then you do have Fr. Z here, and musicasacra.com (thanks, AnAmericanMother!) and its related sites (the chant cafe blog)… and I thought I’d heard of a site something like “Corpus Christi Watershed”, but am being too lazy to Google it or anything.

    At any rate, most of us are going to continue to be around here on Fr. Z’s, so we can keep bouncing ideas off each other and encouraging each other to do what we can about implementing said ideas.

  11. The Cobbler says:

    And do hang in there… There was a time when I couldn’t get even to a Novus Ordo that wasn’t touchy feely, and it was very difficult for me; but, while I wouldn’t say that the things that happen at Mass are of no consequence except for the Eucharist, I did eventually find that focusing entirely on Christ through the help of Mary to the exclusion of all worry made it bearable. Sort of, allowed me to not get worked up about what was not my fault and beyond my control. But that was a peace that I had to find through personal devotion.

    I’ll say a few prayers for you to find what you need, whether that’s the EF or just the grace to bear the mess in the Church these days and do what you can to inform people. I’ll throw in a few that whoever you inform be open; I know there’s little more discouraging than discovering something very good only to have many people think there’s something wrong with you because you considered that good might not be the status quo. (“Because the status is not quo.” …obligatory Dr. Horrible reference…)

  12. marajoy says:

    I know of a Charismatic parish that most likely is. (They really like Pentecost…)

  13. AnnAsher says:

    Orthodoxchic, I’ll give you an “amen!”
    I’ve had a similarly dissapointing vigil. At tonight’s vigil of Pentecost the contract priest( for the perpetually vacationing parish priest) basically preached the dispute of Pentecost. Here’s how: Jesus is with us always if we are nice to people. That is the meaning of Christ’s words. Worse, on Pentecost there were “a lot of Christians gathered” because “they had come to town for a big celebration”. Then the Holy Spirit descended on ALL the CHRISTIANS, not just the 12. So there. Boom! We’re all Bishops.
    I feel physical pain at the OF yet gas prices have parked me as well. Now I’m mulling tho … How much does blood go for these days?

  14. OrthodoxChick says:

    Thank you, Cobbler. I’ll take all of the prayers I can get! I’m sticking around here, too. I wasn’t suggesting anything to replace what’s here, but hopefully, to add to it even more and help to drive more people to Fr. Z.

    I just figure that there must be more people out there like me who don’t have any idea about the EF Mass or know how to approach it, even if they know where to find it. And I also think there’s a lot of truth in what you said, probably more than I’d care to admit. I’m still recovering from a public defense of the Church on a blog local to my town. Still a few bruises, so I’m not in a huge hurry to take on a new battle quite yet, if that’s what it might turn out to be. I could use the strength in numbers, if that could be an option and I figured perhaps I’m not the only one who’s in this boat.

  15. twherge says:

    Where I am, we had this extended vigil, and the bishop was celebrant since we had confirmations at the Mass. It was a splendid occasion. Nothing spectacular music-wise, but beautiful nonetheless.

  16. MPSchneiderLC says:

    My community had first vespers sung in Gregorian Chant. Very beautiful and recomended. However, we only celebrate two vigil masses in the year Easter Vigil and Christmas Midnight Mass. We go for the masses of the day in other cases.

    I saw this in my hand missal; it would be interesting to see. Unlike all the other vigils save Easter and Christmas it is more than a slight variation of the readings.

  17. Marie Teresa says:

    Father didn’t use the Vigil Mass readings at all. He skipped to Sunday Mass – a surprise for the readers who had prepared and practiced the Vigil readings. 
    In the last six months he’s dropped things that he previously did “for the glory of God.”  no Mass on Fridays ever, no more First Friday devotions, cut back Stations during Lent, no Mass during the Octaves of Christmas and Easter this year, no Divine Mercy prayers this year, no more Rosaries, no more adult formation – and on and on. Parish council hasn’t met in over six months. We’re his first assignment. He’s a recently ordained but older priest who seems to have lost something. 

  18. AnnAsher says:

    Marie Teresa, I think our priest suffers the same loss (the vacationing one). I didn’t sound very charitable before. I pray for our weary priests who struggle to keep the flame alive.

  19. Volanges says:

    No, no Vigil of Pentecost for us this week. In fact, most people won’t know they’ve missed something because we use the Novalis Sunday Missal and Missalettes and the only Vigil they include is the Easter Vigil. Of course there was no Sequence either, even if it’s obligatory. Neither of the 2 ‘obligatory’ Sequences of Easter and Pentecost are ever sung or recited.

  20. Random Friar says:

    I did not have the Vigil Mass, so I was a little surprised to see the options as I set the Missal up for Mass for the Day. Something to consider for next year, certainly!

  21. brotherfee says:

    Just wanted to follow up on the Extended Pentecost Vigil last night: incredible! Not one, not two, but three priests presiding. The homily was impassioned about the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The singing and music was strong, some members of the congregation raised their hands upwards or spontaneously spoke out about our Lord and the Spirit.

    What a wonderful pair of bookends for this season: the Easter Vigil and now the Pentecost Vigil. Back to Ordinary Time, but I keep thinking about those gifts of the Holy Spirit.

  22. Sid says:

    I thank Henry Edwards for the link to the complete text of the extended form of the Vigil of Pentecost. I saw this Vigil in my new hand Missal, but it is not presented to the extent as it is in the link. I could not find it the official Latin altar missal from 2002. Is this Vigil something new? Something recovered? Whatever, I think such a Vigil is just wonderful, and I particularly like the connection with Vespers.

    Folks, we need to do everything we can to restore Pentecost in the Anglo-Saxon-Celtic world to its proper place in the yearly cycle: It is number two in importance, right after the Easter Triduum and the equal of Christmas. Those of you who know liturgical law better than I might argue that it surpasses Christmas in importance. Its restoration to its proper place means that it must be celebrated with the same intensity as Christmas. So what to do? The Pentecost Vigil is a way to start.

  23. Charlotte Allen says:

    I was the lector for the Saturday vigil Mass at my parish church, and it was only when I got there that I discovered that we were doing special readings for the Vigil of Pentecost and that I had erroneously prepared the readings for Pentecost Sunday itself. Fortunately I had arrived at the church really early so I had time to prepare in a rush. What’s odd is that I always prepare my readings using “Magnificat,” the beautiful subscription missalette–whose May issue, strangely, contains no Mass text for the Pentecost Vigil (I double-checked afterwards). The text did appear in the “Breaking Bread” missalette in our church’s pews, so I used that to prepare. Per the priest’s instructions, however, I read only one of the four Old Testament readings. The priest seemed to be under the impression that he had a choice of which of the four to select, and he picked the first one, the story in Genesis of the Tower of Babel. I didn’t realize until I read this post that we should have properly used all four.

    Is the Vigil of Pentecost Mass a new development? I had always attended the regular Pentecost Mass on Sunday morning until this year, because I was scheduled to read on the preceding Saturday.

  24. Rev. Mr. Stephen says:

    No Extended Vigil at my parish. Not even the Vigil Mass–the associate rector ordered the Sunday Mass propers and readings to be done on Saturday evening, but nevertheless did not even do the Sequence (I don’t think the Sequence is called for in the Vigil but is designated for the Sunday Mass). Adding any of these things to our liturgy might cause the Mass to go beyond the 50 minutes that the customers, er, I mean the faithful have come to expect.

  25. 3D says:

    A friend sent me a link

    The “extraordinary” form formerly had a Pentecost Vigil that was almost the same as the Easter Vigil to show their close relation: There were six prophecies read, several including collects and tracts; red altar frontals and flowers were covered in violet until the Gloria; baptismal water was blessed at the font and baptisms performed; Litanies were sung with the ministers prostrated; and bells were rung at the Gloria. The Hanc Igitur of Pentecost still references those who were baptized at the Vigil.

    Of course, all this was tragically annihilated with the new Holy Week in 1951. Bugnini & Co., it is said, did not have time to destroy this vigil as they did that of Easter, and so simply deleted it. But, like much of the pre-1950′s Holy Week, it is restored in the Novus Ordo under the guise of the “Extended Pentecost Vigil.”

    The faithful could formerly attend the traditional Holy Week and Pentecost Vigil in many, if not most, places until the last several years . . .

    I wish this blog would be an advocate for the restoration of the traditional rites (the ’62 missal is not the Tridentine missal nor missal of Tradition). Instead, the traditional rites and people like me are criticized around here.

  26. 3D says:

    A friend sent me this post’s link.

    The “extraordinary” form formerly had a Pentecost Vigil that was almost the same as the Easter Vigil to show their close relation: There were six prophecies read, several including collects and tracts; red altar frontals and flowers were covered in violet until the Gloria; baptismal water was blessed at the font and baptisms performed; Litanies were sung with the ministers prostrated; and bells were rung at the Gloria. The Hanc Igitur of Pentecost still references those who were baptized at the Vigil.

    Of course, all this was tragically annihilated with the new Holy Week in 1951. Bugnini & Co., it is said, did not have time to destroy this vigil as they did that of Easter, and so simply deleted it. But, like much of the pre-1950?s Holy Week, it is restored in the Novus Ordo under the guise of the “Extended Pentecost Vigil.”

    The faithful could formerly attend the traditional Holy Week and Pentecost Vigil in many, if not most, places until the last several years . . .

    I wish this blog would be an advocate for the restoration of the traditional rites (the ’62 missal is not the Tridentine missal nor missal of Tradition). Instead, the traditional rites and people like me are criticized around here.