Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals

Today I took in the Audience Pope Francis held for the College of Cardinals in the Sala Clementina.  It was entirely charming.

20130315-114600.jpgThere was a little scare, however.  After the first greeting by the Dean of the College, Card Sodano, the Pope rose to go down to him and he almost fell on the stair.  I noticed that in during the Mass yesterday he also had a little help going down the step from his chair.

He again came in only the white cassock… I hope he will bend to decorum over time… and gave a talk that was partly prepared and partly extemporaneous.  He departed frequently from his text to add observations.

20130315-114629.jpgWe need a transcript yet, but watch for his wonderful digression about how most of the men there (himself included) are now old.  Old age, he said, is the place of wisdom, it is like a good wine that has to be shared with young people.

He spoke about the need not to be pessimistic.  Give no place, he said, to pessimism, which the devil offers us every day.  Yesterday he spoke about the devil, saying that if we are not praying to the Lord, we are praying to the devil.  He clearly believes in the spiritual warfare going on around us.

20130315-114647.jpgHe smiled, he quoted from a German poet, he smiled, he extemporized, he smiled, he spoke warmly of the humble example of Benedict XVI, he smiled.  He brought forth a strong memory of John Paul I.

As we move out of the first hours of this pontificate and into days and then weeks, we will see him more clearly as he is.  He exudes warmth.

Finally, here is a view I think we will see a lot of.

20130315-114703.jpg

I suspect we will see this Pope visibly in prayer.  Perhaps it will be more of a praying pontificate than a teaching pontificate.  But Francis was able to quote a German poet when departing from his text.

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67 Responses to Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals

  1. papist says:

    Where do you get the feed from these types of events? Do you a link Father?

  2. haribo says:

    We should keep in mind that a white cassock 24/7 has a strong precedent in JPII. Benedict XVI was the modern exception, but Pope Francis seems to have already made a conscious decision to return to the former practice Benedict moved away from. It’s honestly a little surprising to see such a sudden change in “style.” Benedict moved very slowly and carefully when he became pope. It was years before we even saw a new processional cross.

  3. Imrahil says:

    As the joke about Hölderin goes (no disrespect to our Holy Father intended),

    Hölderin to Schiller: “What could I possibly do? Noone buys my Hyperion! Should I, perhaps, put more fire into my verses?”
    Schiller to Hölderin: “The reverse, my dear. The reverse.”

  4. Imrahil says:

    Hölderlin, of course.

  5. Adam says:

    I agree. This will be the praying pope. It was very much the pontificate of John Paul II as well, since we often saw him deep in prayer in public, something that we need to see far more from bishops and priests. When was the last time you saw a bishop kneeling in prayer in his cathedral?
    But so far within the first 36 hours we are seeing a very prayerful, humble, tactile pope. This morning watching all the cardinals come to Francesco, he gave them all wam embraces, many doing the double greeting kiss, some kneeling and many asking for things to be bklessed. And also cardinal Napier of South Africa gave him a bracelet which he placed immediately on his right wrist. Never seen that before.
    The bishop of rome in his simple white cassock and silver pectoral cross reminds me so much of John Paul I whom I saw at at audience in the month of his pontificate. He smiled, spoke off the cuff and was at ease with the people. Francesco has that great pastoral touch which will endear him to all. He is not a distant pope and I expect to see the unexpected.
    I expect he will go out into Rome far more often to parishes, seminaries and monasteries to speak and eat with people. This will be a very tactile pontificate.
    We should never be concerned as to whether he wears the heavy stole around his neck. His authority derives not from the stole but from his apostolic mission given by the Lord Hmself.
    As evidenced yesterday at the Eucharist, he prayed many parts so slowly and with deep reverence. Not rushed, but prayed with deep humility for the Lord in the sacrament.
    This may be a short pontificate, but it certainly going to be memorable and a turning point for the papacy.
    Semper fidelis.

  6. haribo says:

    “We should never be concerned as to whether he wears the heavy stole around his neck.”

    Benedict thought it was an important enough custom to observe. It’s a signs of the pope’s papal authority, and we know that signs and symbols matter.

  7. Dr. Eric says:

    Yes, let’s be concerned about how wide the phylacteries are. Quit bashing The Pope.

  8. frjim4321 says:

    I appreciate the many little signs that in the first 36 hours have set a marvelous tone for this papacy. I am looking forward to Tuesday.

  9. Juergensen says:

    I read a wonderful piece this morning by George Weigel titled “The First American Pope”, and then came here to read complaints about whether our new Holy Father has worn the heavy stole or not. Really?

  10. Miserando says:

    May God bless Pope Francis.

  11. Miserando says:

    Sorry – the backslash was not well-received.
    Pope Francis with Cardinals

  12. haribo says:

    The complaining about complaining is getting tiresome. I don’t have any horse in the race, but I think it’s funny that the same people who were overjoyed 8 years ago when Benedict “returned to the use of x” are now mocking others for thinking those things matter. If stoles don’t mean anything, then no one should have cared when the last pope put one on. But of course that wasn’t the case.

  13. Dr. Eric says:

    The complaining about the complaining about the complaining is tiresome. Here you have a Pope who has shown as a bishop he takes the Evanglical Counsels seriously and we have, as someone put it, a very vocal minority complaining that he didn’t wear the fanon or the triregnum or his mitre is plain or he didn’t wear the new pectoral cross.

    This pope has a new and different mission from The Lord and the vocal minority wants everything to be like it was in 1824, it’s not going to happen. I think I need to retire from this blog so as to not violate the bounds of Christian charity in defending the new pope.

  14. Liz says:

    Thank you, Father. I really appreciate your insights. It sure helps to put things in perspective. It hit me last night as I prayed a little prayer on the back of a holy card that this is the year of Faith for a reason. I realized that I need to have faith that God has it all figured out. Change is hard, but it’s obviously for a good reason. We need to pray and sacrifice, leaving the rest to God. I’m excited about Pope Francis what God has planned for him and for our church. God bless him! Stay warm (and healthy.) We are praying for your intentions, Father.

  15. capchoirgirl says:

    Dr. Eric: AMEN!!!! I’m a JPII generation girl (Born in 1982), so he was the only pope I knew until 2005, and he is what I base my opinion of a pope upon. So, you know, to me, Francis looks a lot like him!
    There are legitimate things to be “concerned” about with a pope, I guess, but whether or not he wears a stole does not seem, to me, to be one of them. Benedict XVI was all about liturgy–he wrote about it extensively before becoming pope. That’s not going to be every Pope’s focus. This one has a prayerful, Marian bent that I find extremely attractice, and, honestly, *needed*. The world needs to see us in prayer!
    Now, no, I don’t want clown and guitar Masses. I am perfectly happy at my NO Parish where we chant and I will never again hear “Gather Us In” Or something similar. But this talk of stoles and amices, etc.? Guys.

  16. capchoirgirl says:

    Gah, “attractive.” Haven’t had my coffee yet. :)

  17. haribo says:

    “But this talk of stoles and amices, etc.? Guys.”

    Remember this post from six months ago, when Pope Benedict wore a “fanon”?
    http://wdtprs.com/blog/2012/10/fanon-wherein-fr-z-rants-opines-predicts/

    I agree with you that in the grand scheme of things, what the pope wears isn’t really that important, but as Fr. Z shows, it’s not unimportant either. In the age of electronic media, how a pope presents himself is definitely more important than it ever way. Many Catholics may never know more about Pope Francis than what he looks like in pictures. Benedict knew that, and these little things like stoles and amices were part of his Marshall Plan for the Church. It was good while it lasted, bad that it probably won’t continue.

    Pope Francis seems like a very holy man. He might be the best man for the job, but my faith in the indefectability of Christ’s Church is strong enough that I don’t have to believe every aspect of a Pope’s agenda is automatically the best thing for the Church. If I did, I could never be a historian.

  18. Speaking of a positive influence of our new Holy Father. I was listening to parts of the briefing from Fr. Lombardi this morning, and I believe he said that the priests in Argentina have been literally overwhelmed with people coming to confessions, many after 20 years of absence. Now, my Italian is pretty weak, but that the essence of what (I think) was said.

    THAT, my friends, is a good start!

  19. FlorinT says:

    @papist, you can try one of the following links:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/vatican (live feed + recorded events)
    http://www.vatican.va/video (live feed)

  20. Giuseppe says:

    The white cassock is how I think of a Pope (I grew up with JP II), and I think it is the highest form of dignity. It is the papal counterpart of the all-black dress of a parish priest, the true soldiers who fight for our Lord daily.

    True dat on the ‘prayerful pope’. To see a man in power humbly pray jars my soul in an uncomfortable and very powerful way. We are nothing without the grace of God. Nothing.

  21. StJude says:

    So cool you are there, father.

  22. haribo says:

    Dress doesn’t matter? These were the first lines of today’s Financial Times article on the new Pope:
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/67e404f0-8ccb-11e2-8ee0-00144feabdc0.html?ftcamp=published_links%2Frss%2Fworld_europe%2Ffeed%2F%2Fproduct#axzz2NcKJLPfQ
    “What kind of pope will Jorge Bergoglio be? For clues, look at his hat.”

    They expected a mitre, but their point is that he didn’t look like other popes, and that meant something.

  23. Traductora says:

    People are criticizing the critics who liked it when BXVI adopted a particular ceremonial piece of clothing and are now saying it doesn’t matter that Pope Francis is leaving it aside again. But things change. What was right for Pope Benedict to do isn’t necessarily the thing Pope Francis needs to do but certainly doesn’t cancel out what BXVI did.

    He made his point: continuity. Now Pope Francis is making his point, which may perhaps be communication – but now with more confidence because of that same continuity brought to the fore by his predecessor.

  24. Gaetano says:

    In light of Pope’s Francis’ homily yesterday, we might say that while Pope Benedict’s primary emphasis was orthodoxy, Pope Francis’s will be orthopraxis.

    The two are not exclusive. One cannot be done without the other. Perhaps now that we have enjoyed Benedict’s remedy, we are ready for Francis’s.

  25. Marie S. says:

    No one man save Christ is perfect or can meet all the needs of the flock. I believe the Holy Spirit guides the Cardinals to choose the man who will do the work the Lord requires and teach the flock that which they most need to hear.

    Their Holinesses Blessed John Paul II and Benedict XVI choose very different paths during and to end their papacies, and I believe both were following the guidance provided to them. Through their endings, we needed to learn both how to submit ourselves in joining our sufferings to Christ, and also how to submit ourselves to know that we’re not irreplaceable, whatever our gifts.

    What is the Lord going to teach us through Pope Francis? It seems we need to learn again humility and charity.

  26. acardnal says:

    EWTN will rebroadcast this event (Pope meeting w/Cardinals today) at 1 PM EDT today.

  27. John Nolan says:

    He is no longer the Archbishop of Buenos Aires. His personal views are of no account. He might well prefer the Novus Ordo to the TLM; he might well not want to use ‘Roman’ vestments. But what benefit would be gained by rescinding SP? A lot of traditionalist Catholics would immediately mark his card and some may defect to the SSPX. The so-called liberals would be no more likely to accept the orthodoxy which he has preached and will continue to preach.

  28. wkercher says:

    Marie S.
    Very good points. We must remember that we received Benedict XVI prior to Francis. The reform of liturgy to proper reverence has already begun and I don’t think Francis will undo any of what Benedict XVI started. It is also important to note that this has not been a mandate of the liturgy but mainly an organic movement in dioceses across the globe to return the liturgy to it’s proper place by some bishops, priests and laity. I believe the Holy Spirit knew this was important…next comes humility and charity to get people back into the Church to experience the beauty of the liturgy.

  29. JacobWall says:

    You can also find videos and texts on the Vatican website. So far, only the video:

    http://www.radiovaticana.va/player/index_fb.asp?language=it&tic=VA_OP9SS8A1

    They also have news articles that share a large portion of the text in German, Italian, Portugese. English (and notably Spanish) are missing. No transcripts so far. In general, everything can be found via the Pope Francis page on the Vatican site:

    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/francesco/index.htm

    I don’t know how long they take to post each item on this page after it happens, but usually, by the time I get there, at least the video is up.

    The EWTN re-broadcast should be good. Will they translate?

  30. JacobWall says:

    English transcript of the Audience:

    http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/03/15/pope_francis_greets_cardinals:_full_text_/en1-673706

    Vatican Radio is not the most organized of sites. They often don’t put links to this stuff in places where they should be (like on the page for Pope Francis’ statements or on the page of “related article” that you can see before you watch the video in Italian.) But if you dig around a bit, you can find it. The main Vatican News page in English often shows these texts (as “news” items) before they get links on the main Vatican page or other places:

    en.radiovaticana.va/index.asp

  31. Suburbanbanshee says:

    “I extend an especially affectionate thought, filled with gratitude, to my venerable predecessor, Benedict XVI, who, during the years of his pontificate enriched and invigorated the Church with his teaching, his goodness, guidance, faith, humility, and his meekness, which will remain the spiritual patrimony of all. The Petrine ministry, lived with total dedication, found in him a wise and humble interpreter with his gaze always fixed on Christ, the Risen Christ, present and alive in the Eucharist. Our fervent prayer will always accompany him, our eternal memory, and affectionate gratitude. We feel that Benedict XVI lit a flame in the depth of our hearts, a flame that continues to burn because it will be fanned by his prayers that will continue to sustain the Church on its spiritual and missionary journey.”

    That’s not a case of, “And I’m dumping all his junk in the back forty and having a rummage sale.”

  32. JacobWall says:

    Nicely put, Suburbanbanshee.

    Also, a note about the Pope Francis page from I shared above (http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/francesco/index.htm). It looks very pretty, but to give an idea of how well organized it is, his first audience today was listed under “Speeches” and not “Audiences.” Shouldn’t it probably be in both? (And, as I complained, it only links to the video in Italian and not the translated text in English.)

    In any case, I shouldn’t complain, since it’s so wonderful that we have this resource. The Vatican website is full of excellent resources, including a full collection of encyclicals, homilies, etc. from all the popes back to Leo XIII (http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/). Sometimes you have to dig around a bit, but it’s well worth it.

    For the newest texts or videos, like today’s audience, it’s often worth checking Vatican Radio in English for, or in addition (http://en.radiovaticana.va/index.asp).

  33. Traductora says:

    LOL, suburbanbanshee! Exactly, I don’t see any intention on the part of Pope Francis to reject BXVI in anything he is doing.

  34. Fr_Sotelo says:

    Dr. Eric:

    “Yes, let’s be concerned about how wide the phylacteries are. Quit bashing The Pope.”

    LOL. Please. Please don’t retire from this blog.

  35. BLB Oregon says:

    He was not wearing a stole when he first came out onto the balcony, but when he gave his first papal blessing, he did put on that magnificent stole. If his example is to wear the splendid things of the Church for public prayer and sacred liturgies, especially those that are most solemn, and yet to choose more simple things for his daily work, that is not such a bad example to set for the clergy or for the laity. It does not make Benedict’s example wrong, and I do not think he intends that it should imply anything of the kind, any more than Benedict’s usage was any kind of indictment of his predecessors. Our Holy Father is simply a Pope being the man the cardinals elected to serve at this moment, which is to say he trusting their judgment and being himself.

    Think back…would this moment have been the same, had Pope Francis been the immediate predecessor of Pope John Paul II? No, it would not. It would be entirely different. To every thing, there is a season….

  36. BLB Oregon says:

    I meant immediate successor, of course, not predecessor: i.e, I was not asking anyone to imagine a Pope Francis between John Paul I and John Paul II!

  37. pmullane says:

    BLB: that is a wonderful point. Priests and bishops should in humility use precious materials and garments in the service of The Lord, and humble ones in service of themselves. My analogy would be ‘precious metals for Mass, pottery for dinner’. Pope Francis could give us a great visible example of what was always present in John Paul and Especially Benedicts lives, giving the best to The Lord, and humble simplicity for ourselves.

  38. acardnal says:

    Fr. Z, Pope Francis has mentioned the Devil two successive days now in his remarks. Perhaps, perhaps he will rejuvenate the office of exorcist in dioceses around the world. He seems to be particularly concerned about the Devil in this world as well he should!

  39. Gaetano says:

    BLB Oregon says:
    Think back…would this moment have been the same, had Pope Francis been the immediate predecessor of Pope John Paul II? No, it would not. It would be entirely different. To every thing, there is a season….

    My thoughts exactly. As per my previous comment, perhaps we needed a Benedict (emphasizing orthodoxy) before Francis (emphasizing orthopraxis). We could not have Francis in the same way if Benedict had not come first.

  40. BLB Oregon says:

    “BLB: that is a wonderful point. Priests and bishops should in humility use precious materials and garments in the service of The Lord, and humble ones in service of themselves.”

    I think as Pope he will also see, though, that his “every day” is a very special day for someone else, and so perhaps he will let those who come to him break the alabaster jar, so to speak, when it is obvious that their extravagance is poured out upon the feet of Christ, and not his own. I think he will navigate that well, though. To have the cardinals wear their black instead of their red and lace is one thing; that is to say: “it is time to get back to our service together.” When it is time for ceremony, though, I think he will break out what is proper for it, for the sake of all the people.

  41. Stumbler but trying says:

    @ BLB Oregon and Dr. Eric…
    Agreed. That is why I find all the concerns about “the lack thereof” of Papa Francisco’s attire interesting. Like I already said in a different thread here, it has been reported he intends to live out his vow of poverty as Pope while bearing the Church upon his shoulders and in his heart. We already know his namesake, St. Francis of Assisi, went against the grain and while the Holy Father may try to do the same, I understand that it cannot be as he wants since he is too important to the world and like Fr. Z has already said, “he will need to bend to decorum.” Well, not quite in those words but I understood and agree. Anyway, I watched some of the clips from his meeting with the Cardinals and found it all very delightful and joyful. Let’s keep praying for him, for the Church and for one another.

    Remember too, the evil one loves division and loves to sow seeds of discontent and confusion. When he does such evil, we are distracted and thus we take our eyes off the one true prize that can lead us to heaven…Jesus Christ!
    Onward then and stop being so afraid! Have hope!

  42. boxerpaws1952 says:

    i liked that he spoke up for our Pope Emeritus. That he put to rest these ideas that Benedict the XVI wasn’t somehow humble or meek. I found something very endearing about our new Holy Father today. I wouldn’t take his warmth as being weak. From what i’ve read about him in Argentina he was never afraid to speak up to the powers that be when it came to defending the truth! We will be fine. He was right that we must not be pessimistic. The man has an unshakeable faith! A good choice for the Church at this time. :) I gave him a 9 because of concerns re liturgical reform and the Curia but a legacy is built over time; not in a few days.

  43. Stumbler but trying says:

    What would we say if Papa Francisco was one who, after having being elevated to the Chair of St. Peter, “loved all the plush and status and trappings” that come with said office and yet, did not love Christ or the Church or our Lady?
    What if the Cardinals were hellbent on voting “anyway they saw fit” and had elected one who was like those corrupt popes of ancient pasts, one who cared for nothing and only the illusion of power and riches of the Papal office? Of reputation and cult status?
    Let us suppose he would come out on the balcony dressed in all the finery of the sacred office and wowed the crowed with sugary words while vice and greed were alive and well in his heart, what then? Many would be taken in, yes? Fooled by outward appearances, they would assume “all is well and he will be a great pope.”

    The thought of what I just posted scares me but again, while I understand it is important (the papal attire) due to his office, it does not make the man. He is full of love and piety and prayer! He loves Jesus, the Church, our Lady. He has a real concern for the poor and the unborn and for the integrity of truth. That is the “clothing” that matters to me.

    I will give Papa Francisco the benefit of doubt as he learns his way around and is guided with great patience and love and respect. Remember, the Papal staff is on a learning journey as well. God bless them all!

  44. Anabela says:

    Please check out Dom Mark Kirby’s blog post…http://vultus.stblogs.org/2013/03/in-the-heart-of-the-church.html

    Its a very beautiful post. We keep our hearts and minds on Christ who is always there for us. God bless our new Holy Father Francis, but I cannot help but feel a bit sad. The above post has given me much comfort. I think it is time for more intense prayer and remember the Passion of Our Lord and let us always keep the Holy Mass Sacred. All Saints in Heaven pray for us and for the Church. The Lord will triumph in the end. God bless you Fr. Z.

  45. Montenegro says:

    The stole and mozzetta are symbols of the office of the papacy. Fr Z has quite rightly pointed out in previous posts (some of which have been referenced in this thread) that these symbols do indeed matter as visible signs of authority. They are not mere trappings.

    Now, am I going to condemn the pontiff as other blogs have done within a few hours of the announcement for failing to wear these items? Certainly not. Such reactions are not Catholic. However, I would be less than honest if I said it was not a cause for concern.

    Either ceremony and papal attire is important, or it isn’t. I take Fr. Z’s “wait and see” approach.

    Based on his demeanor on the loggia, our new Holy Father is a deeply humble and prayerful man. Viva Il Papa!!

  46. This comparison of Pope Francis with his predecessor reminds me of what happens in parishes when a long-time pastor moves on and his successor arrives. Why does Father Newguy do it that way? That’s not how Father Venerable did it! And so it goes.

    No, it’s not that none of it matters; many of these things have importance–relative to the importance of other things. I think some of the irritation being expressed over the criticisms is not to deny the validity of the underlying issues, but to comment on the haste and lack of proportion.

    Also, sometimes the new guy doesn’t do what the beloved, departed pastor does, not because he disagrees, but because of where his strengths are. Maybe Pope Francis doesn’t feel at ease trying to do what Pope Benedict did in matters of liturgy and ceremony. Maybe he’s thinking, I’ve got a lot of new things to deal with, I won’t worry about the liturgical or ceremonial matters quite yet. Who knows?

    And, if indeed he doesn’t see some of these things as important as Pope Benedict did, well that is too bad; but how could it be otherwise? People are package deals. Consider that–as much as we all loved Pope Benedict, it may be that Pope Francis will do some things we wish Pope Benedict had done. (Just as there were those who, loving Pope John Paul II, nonetheless saw ways Benedict outdid JPII in some areas.) That’s how it goes. No one is perfect. This is our pope; he has his strengths and weaknesses, and they will be different from his predecessors; how can it be otherwise?

    Try to see the glass half-full, maybe?

  47. Kathleen10 says:

    I’m so grateful to have a forum where open and earnest discussions can be held on what matters most to us, our God and our church. These are not insignificant points that are discussed, because nothing about our Mother is insignificant. Where others are passionate about different things, sports, for example, in this place the zealous love for Christ and His Church is evident, and all opinions add to the discussion and make participation in this forum that much better! It’s great to have a place where you can voice concerns and such. It’s like a kitchen table!
    Personally, I love Pope Francis already, and I think all signs indicate we have a holy Pope who has a background of strength and independence of mind and behavior that bode well for a Pope who is going to make a definite impact. The Holy Spirit gave him to us, he must be what we need. That being said, it’s natural for us all to feel a bit unnerved, have some trepidation. You all definitely know so much more about these topics than I, but, I think we seem in good hands.

  48. acardnal says:

    CNS published a short 2 minute video of His Holiness greeting his Cardinals today.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=GWJmpRGwxfU

    If anyone knows the artist/song of the music PLEASE let me know! CNS usually publishes that at the end but they simply put ‘freestockmusic.com” which is not helpful. I have contacted CNS but no response yet. I suspect it may be from Argentina.

  49. Stumbler but trying says:

    “People are package deals. Consider that–as much as we all loved Pope Benedict, it may be that Pope Francis will do some things we wish Pope Benedict had done. (Just as there were those who, loving Pope John Paul II, nonetheless saw ways Benedict outdid JPII in some areas.) That’s how it goes. No one is perfect. This is our pope; he has his strengths and weaknesses, and they will be different from his predecessors; how can it be otherwise?”

    So true and thank you, Fr. Martin. We are like Pope Francis in the sense that it is all new to us as well. Some of us are okay and accepting while others will struggle with the changes and that is okay too but let us remain positive and continue to pray as we all are walking this new journey together.

    It is reported that Pope Francis has taken a vow of poverty and has lived it a long time so let us pray for him as he will have to struggle with the challenges/changes now, that he is Pope, of what that will mean. I sense, in time, he will, for love of Christ and His Church, bend a little and make it all work for the greater glory Of God.

    Living poverty in the Vatican?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMH3puwYP3o

  50. Ioannes Andreades says:

    I totally agree with the JPI comparison. I have to admit that those first few tentative moments in the central loggia made me think of the start of Andy Kaufman’s Mighty Mouse routine.

  51. majuscule says:

    acardnal wrote:


    CNS published a short 2 minute video of His Holiness greeting his Cardinals today.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=GWJmpRGwxfU

    How nice to see him in action, smiling!

    If anyone knows the artist/song of the music PLEASE let me know! CNS usually publishes that at the end but they simply put ‘freestockmusic.com” which is not helpful. I have contacted CNS but no response yet. I suspect it may be from Argentina.

    There were some numbers after the name in the credits. Would that help?

  52. Mariana says:

    I just watched the whole thing on Vatican Player (at Radio Vaticana). It was charming, and all of a sudden he said Es ist ruhig, das Alter, und fromm! I’m so impressed.

  53. Giuseppe says:

    Is a Jesuit ever released from a vow of poverty?

  54. Stumbler but trying says:

    Giuseppe says:
    15 March 2013 at 5:30 pm
    Is a Jesuit ever released from a vow of poverty?

    I do not know (the thought of being released sounds strange to me but Fr. Z. is the one to go to on such matters). My hope lies in the fact that it is reported he wants to meet with Benedict. (I still prefer to him as Papa Benedicto). The thought of them meeting may bear much fruit and perhaps Papa Francesco will seek guidance/advice from our beloved Benedicto regarding this.
    What a happy thought and great blessing the day they meet will be. Our precious Lady with her two little sons, while St. Francis intercedes for them. ^^

  55. Elizabeth D says:

    I was watching on EWTN at a friend’s house who has a TV when the Pope gave a rather simple and brief presentation to the Cardinals today, sitting in a fairly ugly throne with a homemade quality, I was struck by their lack of enthusiasm or smiles. It was strange. As the brief remarks concluded, some cardinals were looking at their watches. One was there in choir dress. Choir dress. After reading later that they had been obliged at Mass yesterday to wear black cassocks it made sense to me why one of them would come in choir dress when the occasion called for black cassock. After, when the new Pope was greeting the Cardinals, there was something strange about it too. He just stood and no one, or almost no one knelt to kiss his ring, though many did kiss his ring. Dolan appeared cheery and put his hand on the Pope’s shoulder but really moved on quickly, there was no evident desire to linger. Most then went and greeted Abp Ganswain just as warmly. Abp Ganswain looked restless to me.

  56. Juergensen says:

    Substance > Style

  57. AnnAsher says:

    I’m not bothered by his outward expressions of the simple person he is. I think there is room for some balance. Some foregoing of certain luxuries in accord with his promise (vow?) of poverty. Yet I am concerned to see him not utilize the symbols of his authority because it may give the impression that he is a weak leader. However, even if that impression is given – I think Pope Francis is going to surprise us all. He strikes me as warm, humble, diminutive person within whom lives a great, bold and strong spirit.

  58. TLM says:

    If he wore a burlap sack, it wouldn’t bother me and I love tradition. It’s the substance of his words and actions that continue to fill my mind and heart. Having said that, I feel he will use the robing of tradition when the moment calls for it. Worrying about such matters could be more work of the devil to distract us from that which is more important – and that is the confidence that this is the man the Holy Spirit has given us and he will listen and do the work that is required of him by God.
    Ad Jesu Per Miriam

  59. jhayes says:

    Le Monde reports on the press conference:

    Francis will have lunch with Benedict next Saturday at Castelgondolfo.

    He will take some time for “thought, prayer and dialog” before naming new people to curial posts or reappointing those who previously served.

    He would like a “a poor Church for poor people”

    http://religion.blog.lemonde.fr/2013/03/16/le-pape-qui-embrasse-veut-une-eglise-pauvre-et-non-politique/#xtor=RSS-3208

  60. wolskerj says:

    @acardnal
    http://www.freestockmusic.com calls it “Avenida Del Sol” which is nice. Freestock provides generic background music for use in videos, podcasts, etc. That means the “artists” are studio musicians. The composer’s rights are held by something called “SkillMedia Master, snc” so I imagine there’s such a thing as studio composers as well.
    Thanks for the link to the Pope, who some people claimed “never smiled” when he was their Bishop.

  61. jhayes says:

    Interesting that he will take the helicopter:

    “23 March, Saturday: 12:00pm, departure in helicopter from the Vatican heliport. At 12:15pm he will meet and lunch with Pope emeritus Benedict XVI at Castel Gandolfo and will then return to the Vatican.”

    http://www.news.va/en/news/activities-of-the-holy-father-2

  62. acardnal says:

    wolskerj , Thanks very much for that!

  63. MisterH says:

    The folks at CatholicVote have put together a wonderful, short video commemorating the election of Pope Francis.

    You can view the video at the link:

    http://allhands-ondeck.blogspot.com/2013/03/video-celebrating-election-of-pope.html

  64. acardnal says:

    wolskerj and any others who enjoyed the soundtrack of the CNS video I linked to at 4:43 pm, 15 March above: CNS was kind enough to respond to my query and the song can be downloaded FREE here:

    http://www.freestockmusic.com/2012/international-production-music/free-international-stock-music-avenida-del-sol/

  65. TLM says:

    Not surprised he will use the helicopter. Wise. His mention of the devil twice (the first with reference to within the church) has the devil on alert that his game is up.
    This is not a man that will stop the liturgical reform begun by dear PE BenedictXVI, but move it forward.
    I’m sure Pope Francis is aware he has the attention of the beast and I pray for him and PE Benedict to be guarded.
    Did you put your seatbelts on yet? :)

  66. TLM says:

    Not surprised he will use the helicopter. Wise. His mention of the devil twice (the first with reference to within the church) has the devil on alert that his game is up.
    This is not a man that will stop the liturgical reform begun by dear PE BenedictXVI, but move it forward.
    I’m sure Pope Francis is aware he has the attention of the beast. I pray for him and PE Benedict to be guarded.
    Did you put your seatbelts on yet? :)