Catholic Herald app!

For a few years I have been writing a weekly column for the UK’s best Catholic weekly, the Catholic Herald.  At first I had a column about the prayers of the Mass, which carried us through the transition to the new English translation of the Roman Missal.  Now I have an eclectic column called Omnium Gatherum.  They don’t underscore my column online very often, but it is in the print edition each week.

My editor informed me about…

The new Catholic Herald app is now up and working at iTunes, Google Play and Amazon.

Would you consider retweeting this? [Done!]

We’re offering the first four issues of the magazine absolutely free to anyone who downloads the app anywhere in the world. So this is a chance for us to expand our readership dramatically.

My article HERE.

And our FAQs.

Alas, they don’t have a Fr Z promo code!

Check out the app. Also, you can read subscribe to read the entire print edition online and search their archive.  Very handy for people who would otherwise receive the print edition after the date.

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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4 Responses to Catholic Herald app!

  1. gsk says:

    I downloaded the app, which looks beautiful, but it indicates I must pay to go past the first few pages. Is there something special to getting the four free issues?

  2. Patti Day says:

    I was unable to download the app from Kindle on Amazon. It’s shown as being out of stock.

  3. jltuttle says:

    Tell them they need a windows phone app. I know, the market share is minuscule, but once windows phone 10 takes off… best to get out in front.

  4. Stephanus83 says:

    Downloaded. Thanks for the info Father.

    Now, if only the National Catholic Register would get with the times and make digital only offerings. It’s ridiculous that the National Schismatic Reporter and Amerika are available as Kindle and e-versions while the actual orthodox Catholic news source is stuck in the world of 19th century publishing.