Your Sunday Sermon Notes: 3rd after Epiphany (TLM) & 3rd Ordinary (NO) 2020

Was there a good point made in the sermon you heard at the Mass that fulfilled your Sunday Obligation? What was it? There are a lot of people who don’t get many good points in the sermons they must endure.

For my part… I riffed on the “Domine non sum dignus” prayer for a while.

NB: You can probably tell that I am coming down with something.

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7 Responses to Your Sunday Sermon Notes: 3rd after Epiphany (TLM) & 3rd Ordinary (NO) 2020

  1. In re that last prayer that we say before receiving Holy Communion at Mass: it was only thanks to previews of the new English translation of the Roman Missal that I finally made the connection between that prayer and the words of the centurion.

  2. Yorkmum says:

    Our sermon, 3rd after Epiphany, began with the words “Save the Liturgy, Save the World” and then followed a beautiful exposition to help people enter into the mystery of Holy Mass in the extraordinary form.
    The timing of this sermon was providential (of course….God is so gracious) because in a congregation of probably 100+ the average age was below 30. The EF is growing in York, UK.

  3. Yorkmum says: began with the words “Save the Liturgy, Save the World”

    I’m sure it was brilliant, after such a good start!

  4. Bev says:

    Our sermon was more of a preparation for a grim future where there are many fewer priests. Within the diocese, in 10 years, over half the current priests are expected to be dead or retired & too old for most priestly duties.

    I know that in a nearby diocese there was a person upset with a certain priest for preaching what the Catholic Church teaches on the myth of same-gender marriage and so that person falsely reported the priest for a “boundary violation” against VIRTUS protocols, triggering an investigation and a suspension of faculties. Faithful priests subject to these types of attacks are unlikely to ever get their faculties returned, even when it is quite obvious the allegations were unfounded, because bishops are more worried about bad press than they are protecting their priests against these forces of evil.

    Knowing these things, accepting a vocational call would be especially difficult, knowing your bishop won’t protect you and the unbelieving public will strip you or your office.

  5. ajf1984 says:

    EF Mass at the local ICKSP Oratory here in town. Canon mentioned, among other things, the importance and beauty of the Sacrament of Penance and reminded us that some of the most beautiful words we will ever here, this side of the Veil, are “I absolve you from your sins…” Particularly poignant, as Lad Nbr 3 is currently preparing for his First Confession and First Communion at the Oratory later this spring.

  6. PaulusFranciscus says:

    Yesterday’s homily at our parish was a reflection on the Sunday of the Word of God, with a reflection on how it can be a bit over-ambitious and misguided to attempt to read the complete Bible cover-to-cover, as one would read a novel.

    One needs to develop a relationship with Jesus who is The Word, by getting to know Him chiefly in prayer, and by reading Scripture, wherein we can read The Word made flesh.

    A good strategy, suggested our pastor, is for the lay person to start with the Gospels, reading only 4 verses at a time, prayerfully, and with a view to truly absorbing and reflecting upon those verses, while working one’s way through them all, and seeing how they fit within the overall context of the Gospels where they are found and in Scripture as a whole.

    This was likely on the Holy Father’s mind when he instituted the Sunday of the Word of God. It allows for the development of a truly intimate relationship with Christ through Scripture.

  7. HvonBlumenthal says:

    SSPX Mass: on the Centurion. Besides the centurion’s faith, we should appreciate his ability to recognize the moment when Jesus passed, and seize it. Many of us let such an opportunity pass.

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