A beautiful Gregorian chant against disease

Several sources sent to me about this chant, but a good one seems to be Rorate right now, which has a well crafted, useful page of the chant.

The origins of this prayer are, as some writings have detailed, from the Sisters of the Monastery of Santa Clara in Coimbra, Portugal, during the plague in 1317.

A way that it could be used liturgically:

Stélla caéli extirpávit
Quae lactávit Dóminum
Mórtis péstem quam plantávit
Prímus párens hóminum.
Ipsa stélla nunc dignétur
Sídera compéscere,
Quórum bélla plébem caédunt
Dírae mórtis úlcere.

O gloriósa stélla máris
A péste succúre nóbis:
Audi nos, nam te fílius
Níhil négans honórat.
Sálva nos, Jésu!
Pro quíbus vírgo máter te órat.

RECITATION OF THE LITANY OF LORETO… then:

?. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix.
?. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi

Oremus
Deus misericórdiae, Deus pietátis, Deus indulgéntiae, qui misértus es super afflictiónem pópuli tui, et dixísti Angelo percuténti pópulum tuum: Cóntine manum tuam ob amórem illíus Stellae gloriósae, cuius úbera pretiósa contra venénum nostrórum delictórum quam dúlciter suxísti; praesta auxílium grátiae tuae, ut intercedénte Beata Vírgine María Matre tua et Beato Bartholomaéo apóstolo tuo dilécto ( or else et Sancto Ráphael tuo Archángelo), ab omni peste et improvísa morte secúre liberémur, et a totíus perditiónis incúrsu misericórditer salvémur. Per te, Iesu Christe Rex glóriae, qui vivis et regnas in saécula saeculórum. Amen.

ENGLISH:

The star of heaven, she who suckled the Lord, has uprooted the scourge of death which the first parent of mankind planted. That very star is now worthy to encompass the world, whose wars cut down the people with the sore of dreaded death. O glorious star of the sea, save us from the scourge: Hear us, for the son, denying nothing, honors you. Save us, Jesus! For us, the virgin mother entreats you.

?. Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God.
?. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray
O God of mercy, God of forbearance, God of forgiveness, who was moved to compassion for the affliction of Your people, and who said to the Angel devastating Your people: Hold your hand for the love of that glorious Star, at whose dearest breast You graciously fed against the poison of our sins; grant the help of Your grace, that as Your Mother the Blessed Virgin Mary, and Saint Bartholomew your beloved Apostle (Saint Raphael, your Archangel), we be safely freed from every disease and from an unprovided death, and that we may be mercifully saved from the assault of utter ruin.  Though You, Christ Jesus, King of Glory, who lives and reigns, world without end. Amen.

For our readers in Italy: HERE

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7 Responses to A beautiful Gregorian chant against disease

  1. Suburbanbanshee says:

    In this case we could think of the “sore” as being the coronavirus lung damage.

  2. Kathleen10 says:

    All of us praying this prayer asking for God’s mercy, it’s a very consoling thought.

  3. APX says:

    I just proposed this to our priest and we’ll be doing it on Sunday.

  4. IXLR57 says:

    This is good. I’ll include this in my daily prayer. Would it be permissible to pray/sing the Regina Caeli during this pandemic even though it is Lent? I understand that some traditions have it that the prayer was sung by angels when St. Gregory the Great processed through Rome during a particularly bad pestilence.

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  7. Rob_in_the_UK says:

    Hoping to have this more widely prayed in song (not everyone is happy with Gregorian staves), I have prepared a new typesetting of it, in modern stave notation, along with my best attempt at a translation into English which sort of conforms to the Latin accents, vowels and rhymes. No credit ever required for this. Use it. Adapt it. Improve it. Use it.

    Link to pdf: https://pdfhost.io/v/ysWHtMpp_Stella_Caelipdf.pdf

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