Your Sunday Sermon Notes – 3rd Sunday of Lent 2020 – The rise of spiritual warriors

Was there a good point made in the sermon you heard at the Mass that fulfilled your Sunday Obligation? What was it?

There are a lot of people who don’t get many good points in the sermons they must endure.

For my part, I talk about the rise of true spiritual warriors and their weapons.

 

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15 Responses to Your Sunday Sermon Notes – 3rd Sunday of Lent 2020 – The rise of spiritual warriors

  1. Veilinglady says:

    This scripture passage was referenced:
    2 Chronicles 7:13-14 New International Version (NIV)
    13 “When I shut up the heavens so that there is no rain, or command locusts to devour the land or send a plague among my people, 14 if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.

    St Charles Borromeo and 40 days devotion to end plague was mentioned

    As was a locust plaque in 1870’s that was stopped by chapel being built in Cold Spring, MN . Construction started July 16 (Our Lady of Mount Carmel), First Mass held on August 15, plaque was done by September 8 (Our Lady’s birthday)

  2. Sue in soCal says:

    The main point of the sermon was that Christ crossed all the barriers of the Jews when he spoke to the woman at the well. He does the same for us.

    At Mass today our diocese suffered a major blow. The bombshell was before the final blessing when our pastor announced that our bishop suspended all Masses until further notice. I wept.

    If we truly believe the great plague is upon us, we should start up a plethora of Masses, Adorations, Rosaries, devotions, and Eucharistic processions. Otherwise, we are putting our faith in worldly remedies and not in God.

    Padre Pio observed that it would be easier for the world to exist without the sun than without the sacrifice of the Mass. Our bishops are conceding major ground in the spiritual war raging around us. The next crisis will come and the concession will be greater unless our bishops, rather than retreat, decide to turn and fight like Archbishop Sample and Bishop Strickland.

    This announcement has made me realize that I am not doing enough. I have failed. I will be intensifying my penitential sacrifices for Lent along with my prayers. I have been going to sleep saying the Rosary, waking during the night to go to the next decade, waking again about 3 AM to finish the Rosary and start a Divine Mercy Chaplet (I have had great trouble sleeping my whole life so this has become my nightly routine), and starting another Rosary. I need to continue praying the Rosary throughout the day, pray more devotions, spend more time in adoration face down on the floor, fast more, give up more, give more alms, seek and love suffering more, love more, desire humiliation and ask for that to be my gift from my suffering Lord. I will strive to become a better soldier in the Church Militant, the army of Christ.

    Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.

  3. Suburbanbanshee says:

    Homily was about what we can do to continue to grow in faith and love, and in hope, during adverse conditions. God seeks us out in times of trouble; do we welcome him?

    Sue — Fear not and rejoice always. You can do penitence without getting depressed and fearful.

    Masses got shut down during the ages of great faith, too. If there were blizzards for a month, or floods for a month, you would hunker down and pray calmly. It isn’t a sign of poor moral fiber to not have the Church ask the impossible! But this would be a great time to pray for all the sorrows and wrongs of our country and our world. Imagine the great friendships you can make with the saints!

  4. Just Some Guy says:

    Family and I were next town over and went to Saturday confession and anticipated Mass with 40 something priest (who, by the way, wore a biretta into confession room). When he reviewed changes due to the virus, he said since social distancing precautions made the peace handshake questionable, he’d just skip the sign of peace among the congregation all together. He also suggested to stop the hand holding during Lord’s Prayer and added that that custom just somehow “trickled in,” is not prescribed anywhere and that it is a pose for the priest reminiscent of Christ’s outstretched arms on the cross. He mentioned that some might be nervous about receiving communion and mentioned spiritual communion. Was happy to hear. Would never have got that at our home parish.

  5. JoanM says:

    I live in Trinidad So ar I ony know of2 people here tested ositive for corano vius. Yet yestedy during te Evening news our Archisho announced rhat he has cancelled allMasses, effective yesterday evening. H urged asmany as possible to actvely watch aily Mss on Trinity cable channel, which my husbnd and I did nd both mde spiritual Commubion too.

  6. ThePapalCount says:

    The deacon explained that Jesus was weary and that he approached the well where the woman was. He engaged her in some small talk and then asked her for water. This started their conversation. The deacon asked the congregation this question: “What was Jesus really thirsting for?” He asked again and then paused and said, “Her soul”. He explained that Jesus was thirsting for her soul which was in peril. Jesus knew about her way of living. He encouraged her to change. The deacon said Jesus thirsts for our souls too because we are loved, highly valued and destined for heaven. He challenged us to consider the things we often thirst for – things of the world which do not last. He challenged us to parch or thirst for the things of God instead. And Lent was a good time to do that….to quench our thirst for the heavenly things. To drink the “living water” which is Christ Himself.
    It was good.

  7. bartlep says:

    At the Latin Mass at my parish, our pastor (not the celebrant) gave such a warm, pastoral message to us. I was in tears from his first words (and I do not tear up easily). He started with the words in this “unprecedented time” of no Masses and followed with what our parish is doing to help us remain close to Jesus. He acknowledged that we could view streaming Masses on TV but suggested, rather than being glued to a screen, we could come to the church and spend a couple of hours on Sunday before the Blessed Sacrament, which would be exposed from 8:30 am to pm every Sunday, with confessions from 9 – 11 am. The church would be open during for week for added times of prayer.

    The celebrant (from the Norbertine Abbey in Silverado) gave such an uplifting homily on receiving Communion. He said we would receive the same graces in a fervent Spiritual Communion as we would in the reception of Holy Communion. We could do a Spiritual Communion every day every hour, every half hour, every 15 minutes — all to remain close to Our Lord.

    We have been given an unasked for Lenten penance but which could turn out to be a good preparation for Easter. We have been given an “unprecedented opportunity” to grow in holiness.

  8. Here at St. Albert’s Priory in Oakland we simulcast the Sunday Mass today, with permission and encouragement of Bp. Barber. With very little advanced publicity, the Mass was watched by over 350 people nationwide. We will continue to simulcast our Sunday Masses until the end of the Coronavirus crisis, even if we have to close our chapel to the general public. I preached on the Samaritan Woman, but those who really want to hear about the sermon can listen to it in the recorded simulcast here:

    https://livestream.com/accounts/2079966/events/9039896

    Note that there are about 9 minutes of “dead air time” before the Mass starts, so you might want to jump to 9:03 or so.

  9. OssaSola says:

    After our EF Mass today, Father led the Litany of the Sacred Heart in Latin to ask for protection for the Church and its members.

  10. At the high Mass at St. Cyril and Methodius in Bridgeport, CT (normally attended by about 50 or 60 people anyway), the priest ended by quoting Matthew 10:28: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.”

  11. iPadre says:

    I talked about Holy Water at both the OF & EF. The Gospel for the OF talked about water. All these elements were transformed by the Incarnation. And in the EF our Lord’s battle with the evil one. We are at war and need to take up the weapons at hand.

    In the traditional blessing, we pray:

    “That everything…sprinkled with this water may be rid of all uncleanness… Let no breath of infection, no disease-bearing air remain in these places.”

    Thank God for our Catholic faith and her rites. A gift in times of trial.

  12. johnr says:

    Visiting priest started Mass today by saying that God doesn’t practice “social distancing.” He is always as close to us as He can be.

    He read the first paragraph of the Gospel, then told everyone to sit down. “I’m going to do this a bit different” he said. He then proceeded to combine the story of the Samaritan woman at the well with some free form history, geography, and rambling. It was very strange. (At least he didn’t do the “for the many” in the Eucharistic Prayer. Except he added phrases and skipped phrases in the EP, so I don’t know)

    Our Bishop has excused 60+ aged people from Mass for the next 3 weeks. And while we are already an older parish, out of the 58 people at Mass including the Priest and servers, there were 7 people under 50 in attendance.

  13. JonPatrick says:

    We went to Mass as we often do in neighboring New Brunswick where it was announced this would be the last Mass probably until Easter as all dioceses in the province were canceling masses. Father in his homily noted that if our reaction is to be relieved that we don’t have to go to mass then maybe we need to examine our hearts and think about our relationship with God. The sacraments are important to us as a channel of God’s grace. He also noted how in Poland they are adding more masses not canceling them.

  14. JesusFreak84 says:

    “Panic, not penance” was the part I’m most trying to keep in mind. Because I can’t remember enough to produce a direct quote, I’m sure my paraphrase will make it sound like Father was being callous, but I promise that wasn’t the case. He basically pointed out that, between how many millions of abortions we see every day, with the advancement of the Rainbow Reich (my words, not his,) and etc., we might actually be getting off pretty easy. It reminded me of one of the prayers in my hand missal for after Communion, St. Augustine, I think, something along the lines of, “What we deserve is grave–what we receive is slight.”

  15. JesusFreak84 says:

    “Penance, not panic” was the part I’m most trying to keep in mind. Because I can’t remember enough to produce a direct quote, I’m sure my paraphrase will make it sound like Father was being callous, but I promise that wasn’t the case. He basically pointed out that, between how many millions of abortions we see every day, with the advancement of the Rainbow Reich (my words, not his,) and etc., we might actually be getting off pretty easy. It reminded me of one of the prayers in my hand missal for after Communion, St. Augustine, I think, something along the lines of, “What we deserve is grave–what we receive is slight.”

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