Benedict XVI: CD’s of the Rosary in Latin

Vatican Radio has issued a 4 CD set of the Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI reciting the Rosary.

In Latin.

I don’t have any practical ordering information yet.

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71 Responses to Benedict XVI: CD’s of the Rosary in Latin

  1. Steve says:

    I listen to the Rosary in Latin that the late Pope JPII made most days in the car. The recoding pre-dated the Luminous mysteries, but it is really nice to hear.

  2. Agnes B. Bullock says:

    YEAH!!!!!

  3. Gregor says:

    On the website of Vatican Radio (Italian edition), it says to order by sending an email to this address: promo@vatiradio.va

    See: http://www.radiovaticana.org/it1/prm_cd.asp

    [Thanks for that! – Fr. Z]

  4. Frank H says:

    Do we know if this includes the Luminous Mysteries? Some traditionalists decry this “innovation” by JPII, since it sort of disconnected the 150 count Rosary from the 150 psalms. Has Benedict ever commemnted on this?

  5. Frank, this is from Zenit on May 15, 2008

    “Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi said requests from the faithful motivated Vatican Radio to release a four-CD set with all 20 mysteries of the rosary led by Benedict XVI in Latin.”

  6. Jason says:

    Some traditionalists decry this “innovation” by JPII, since it sort of disconnected the 150 count Rosary from the 150 psalms.

    If it helps, think of it as 150 Psalms and 50 proverbs. :P

  7. Jason says:

    *By the way, I love the luminous mysteries. They have such great material for meditation.

  8. Jenny Z says:

    SWEET!!! I’ve wanted to learn to say the rosary in Latin for a while now, this is a good excuse :D

  9. aws says:

    I’ve never understood the big problem some traditionalists have with the luminous mysteries. The Rosary predates any specific set of mysteries (the ones we’re accustomed to were promoted by St. Dominic). I think that the Rosary lends itself to any number of meditations.

  10. “If it helps, think of it as 150 Psalms and 50 proverbs.”

    Tried that. Then I discovered no one ever called it “Our Lady’s Psalter with Proverbs.” I don’t mind the Luminous Mysteries; I just don’t believe JPII ever intended them to be a “mandatory” component of the Rosary. (Yes, I read his decree.) I do believe the Catholic publishing machine ran all the way with it, though.

    But hey, that’s just me.

  11. “I’ve never understood the big problem some traditionalists have with the luminous mysteries.”

    See “Our Lady’s Psalter,” above.

  12. chironomo says:

    I commented on this CD back on May 16th

    http://chironomo.blogspot.com/2008/05/benedict-makes-point-again.html

    and found interesting the statement in the Zenit article at that time:

    “Father Lombardi said Benedict XVI decided to record the CDs in Latin because “we have received requests not only from Italy but from places such as Germany and other countries. So we have used this language for the rosary which everyone understands easily and because it is the universal language of the Church.”

    How wonderful to hear someone say that Latin can be understood easily and that it is the universal language of the Church… not the “Official” language, but the “universal” language… nice!

  13. Michael J says:

    If anyone is truly interested in why many “traditionalists” object to the luminous mysteries, here’s just a few:

    Pope Paul VI addressed a similar issue during his pontificate. He responded by saying:
    “The faithful would conclude that the Pope has changed the Rosary, and the psychological effect would be disastrous… Any change in it cannot but lessen the confidence of the simple and the poor…The Rosary is to remain single in form and unchanged from what it is now. Let any new forms of Marian devotion take their place alongside the Rosary”
    Additionally, in Marialis Cultus, Pope Paul VI teaches that the traditional triune form of the Rosary canonized by Pope St. Pius V—3 groups of mysteries and three groups of 50 Hail Mary’s, corresponding to the 150 psalms in the Psalter—is wisely prescribed by the Magisterium as the best expression of the Christological aspect of the devotion.

    The traditional form of the Rosary was canonized by Pope St. Pius V in his bull Consueverunt

    The Rosary was instituted by Saint Dominic around 1206, under a divine inspiration according to Pope Leo XIII in Supremi Apostolatus Officio

    The normal cycle of Joyful, Sorrowful, Glorious (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday respectively) is thrown out of whack
    The 15 promises of Mary for those who promote the rosary is diminished
    The Fatima message becomes confused
    It is a novelty and the change (some would say tampering) to a time honored and beautiful prayer for no discernable compelling reason
    It presumes that for centuries, the Church has promoted a deficient prayer.

  14. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    The CD set was released at least a couple of months ago and ever since I’ve been watching relevant sites to try and order it. I’ll try the email address posted by Gregor and see what happens.
    In the meantime, God bless Father Z. for injecting regular doses of Orthodoxy into the Catholic ‘cyberbody’.
    Gratefully,
    Jane

  15. Avus says:

    I may have all Latin Rosary recordings including JPII and SSPX. My personal favorite is the one from promultismedia.com. It’s very easy to listen and learn, much more so than the others. Highly recommended for learning to pray the Rosary in Latin.

    A colleague of mine is traveling to Rome this Fall and will check out the Vatican bookstore to see if Pope Benedict’s version can be bought there in person. My only real reason to get it is curiosity. All of the others versions come on a single disc. What could possibly be in Pope Benedict’s recitation to require four entire CDs?

  16. “Let any new forms of Marian devotion take their place alongside the Rosary.”

    …and over the centuries, they have. There are devotions in the form of chaplets that have been with us for years. There have also been various ways of using the Rosary other than the prescribed pattern. None have pretended to alter the traditional pattern of the Rosary. The luminous mysteries can take their place beside the others, on the same terms.

  17. Jason says:

    The normal cycle of Joyful, Sorrowful, Glorious (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday respectively) is thrown out of whack

    That order is still maintained. The Luminous mysteries are prayed on Thursday.

    The Luminous Mysteries do not need to be seen as an extra 50 Hail Mary prayers. They can be seen just as an extra set of Mysteries, within the 150 Hail Mary structure. The Luminous Mysteries do not take away from any of the other sets of mysteries. Each of the other sets of mysteries are still prayed twice a week. I don’t think it is contrary to the origins of the Rosary to add an extra set of Mysteries. Here is some historical information on the development of the Mysteries:

    On the other hand, the practice of meditating on certain definite mysteries, which has been rightly described as the very essence of the Rosary devotion, seems to have only arisen long after the date of St. Dominic’s death. It is difficult to prove a negative, but Father T. Esser, O.P., has shown (in the periodical “Der Katholik”, of Mainz, Oct., Nov., Dec., 1897) that the introduction of this meditation during the recitation of the Aves was rightly attributed to a certain Carthusian, Dominic the Prussian. It is in any case certain that at the close of the fifteenth century the utmost possible variety of methods of meditating prevailed, and that the fifteen mysteries now generally accepted were not uniformly adhered to even by the Dominicans themselves. Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13184b.htm)

    The Luminous Mysteries do not necessarily have to be seen as an “addition,” but can be seen as an alternative for the odd numbered day of the week. Before, the Glorious Mysteries were prayed three times a week, while the other two sets of Mysteries were prayed twice a week. Now, each of them is prayed twice, and the Luminous Mysteries can be seen as an alternative for that seventh day.

    Michael mentioned Fatima, and I think it is significant that Pope John Paul II was the Pope who gave us the Luminous Mysteries. He was the subject of one of the secrets of Fatima. I am only speculating, but it is possible that the inspiration for the Luminous Mysteries did not come from Pope John Paul II alone, but perhaps from Our Lady of Fatima herself. But even if not, I think she would be pleased with this new jewel on her Holy Rosary.

  18. Jason says:

    Just a correction, I said above that “Before, the Glorious Mysteries were prayed three times a week, while the other two sets of Mysteries were prayed twice a week.” I was reading some information and apparently the set of mysteries for Sunday varied according to the Liturgical season. But still, my point was just that one of the sets is prayed three times a week, while the others are prayed two times a week, and the Luminous Mysteries can be an alternative rather than praying one of the sets a third time.

  19. Oliver says:

    More vulgar merchantising. There is a growing market for all things Latin as fashions ebb and flow. Very soon, we will be having Madoinna doing the same.

  20. Jordanes says:

    Michael J said: The Rosary was instituted by Saint Dominic around 1206, under a divine inspiration according to Pope Leo XIII in Supremi Apostolatus Officio

    That legend was believed for a long time, even by Popes, but we now know there is no historical basis for that legend., and in fact history provides evidence that St. Dominic did not institute the Rosary.

    It is a novelty and the change (some would say tampering) to a time honored and beautiful prayer for no discernable compelling reason

    Perhaps no compelling reason, but certainly John Paul II\’s reason is easily discernible in his apostolic letter in which he proposed the Luminous Mysteries as a purely optional modification of the traditional Rosary.

    It presumes that for centuries, the Church has promoted a deficient prayer.

    No, it doesn’t. If a change makes something better (I don\’t say this change makes the Rosary better, and only rarely have I ever prayed the new Mysteries: I prefer the traditional structure of Our Lady\’s Psalter), that doesn’t mean it was deficient before the change.

  21. Michael J says:

    Jason,

    I doubt if a discussion about the merits of the luminous mysteries would be fruitful. I suspect that we will never agree that the addition of a new set of mysteries to the Rosary – as opposed creation of a separate chaplet – was a wise or benificial thing to do.

    I was simply responding to the incorrect notion that objections to this particular devotion arose due to some knee jerk reaction.

  22. The have been variations of the Rosary for some time. I believe that when saying the Dominican Rosary, only the first part of the Creed is said; and the Franciscans has seven decades.

    Could the Rosary with the Luminous Mysteries be analogous to these?

    http://athanasiuscm.blogspot.com/2007/02/why-luminous-mysteries-are-bad.html

  23. Mark says:

    I regularly say the rosary in Latin, but its nice to know that a cd is out. We have an annual procession/Holy Mass/rosary in our diocese every September and the decades are said in 5 different languages but NOT latin…maybe this will change things for next year.

  24. Geoffrey says:

    Oliver said: “More vulgar merchantising. There is a growing market for all things Latin as fashions ebb and flow.”

    As a Catholic publisher devoted to promoting Latin, I take offense to that. Latin should be promoted at all levels of the Church: religious and laity, liturgy and private devotions. We have a common universal language. Let’s use it.

  25. His Highness, the Duke of Tinsalagh says:

    Some of the Latin-pushers on this site must accept that most Catholics do not know Latin, nor do they want to study it. Many of us are quite content with the vernacular languages we were raised with. Besides, even Latin scholars cannot truly claim to have a fluent grasp of the language, seeing as it’s been dead for centuries. Live and let live.

  26. Nathan says:

    I would counsel moderation in our thoughts on the Luminous Mysteries. The Holy Rosary is a private devotion in the sense that it is not part of the official liturgical prayer of the Church (I believe that’s right, someone please feel free to correct me). As far as I can tell, I haven’t gotten into hot water for continuing to say the three mystery cycle, and the liturgical police haven’t been forcing anyone I know into the Luminous Mysteries.

    That said, it does seem more practical for the heroically devout to say fifteen decades a day instead of twenty and the consideration of “Our Lady’s Psalter” is good.

    What should be the standard, especially since the Holy Rosary is not formally liturgical? I would suggest that either practice, as long as it gives glory to God and honor to Our Blessed Mother, would be salutary.

    To His Highness, the Duke of Tinsalagh–yes, you don’t have to be a Latin scholar in the Church today. You don’t even have to be a Latin scholar to say the Holy Rosary in Latin–all one has to do, if so inclined, is to memorize four short Latin prayers (which, at the risk of sounding obnoxious, are the prayers which the Holy Father has suggested that all Catholics memorize in Latin). That method can be very good in helping one focus to meditate upon the mysteries.

    In Christ,

  27. John Paul says:

    In addition to the objections noted above, I think some folks saw the
    addition of a new set of mysteries as more “tweaking” of any and everything
    that stood before Vatican II. New Mass, new Breviary, new Sacramental rites,
    to reflect what many called the “new theology.” So it isn’t out of
    nostalgia for Latin, or 3 sets of mysteries, but rather a sense that the
    reformers, however well intentioned, could not leave anything as it was for
    centuries. That has left some of us pretty bewildered.

  28. You know what? If you don’t want to use the Luminious Mysteries, you don’t have to.

  29. Mitch says:

    I am torn on this one. While I think the addition of the Luminous Mysteries can not be harmful or it would not have been done, I at heart like the Rosary exactly as it has been for centuries. Adding to it reminds me of the newer 3 year lectionary in the NO. The intention is great to provide more exposure to scripture however it can be overwhelming and seem “too big”. It is easier to go by a one year cycle and encounter things year after year. Every 3 years is too infrequent a time to come across something and have it become part of the fabric of our lives. IMHO. But I also see the Holy Pope’s committment to things old (traditional) by recording it in Latin, and things new (refreshed), by reciting the Luminous Mysteries. Change is so hard a word to absorb in the aftershocks of changing Mass……..

  30. a catechist says:

    Quite the tempest in the teapot! Nathan’s right–it’s a private devotion. More to the point, the purpose of the mysteries is to foster meditation. I know plenty of folks who say the Nicene Creed rather than the Apostles’ Creed, and no one’s faith is shaken. I can never make it through the Sorrowful Mysteries myself, being overwhelmed, and usually meditate on one aspect for the whole rosary–a single nail, a single thorn, etc. I can’t imagine either Mary or Our Lord are in heaven saying, “oh look, that person over there’s isn’t meditating right! Red Alert!”

    May St. Therese, who struggled mightily with the rosary, pray for all of us!

  31. Mark G. says:

    I find it sad that so many want to berate the late Holy Father and the Luminous Mysteries. What previous popes said and did was good and useful at their times, and what John Paul II did regarding the Rosary is certainly good and useful now. The faithful should respond with joy and gratitude. I suspect John Paul II was intimately familiar with the prior popes’ writings and considered this change carefully. Perhaps he even consulted with the head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith about it.

    The argument about the 150 Psalms simply doesn’t apply, unless there is some one-for-one Psalm-Mystery match-up that no one’s told me about. If one’s Rosary consists of praying 150 Psalms, it still doesn’t apply. The comment about disturbing the flow of days doesn’t really work, because after Mon-Tue-Wed, the Mysteries are out of order anyway. It seems the opposite is true, as the last Luminous Mystery of the Institution of the Eucharist on Thursday leads directly into the first Sorrowful Mystery of the Agony in the Garden on Friday. The argument that these additional Mysteries are wrong just because they are new is silly and naïve. Doctrine develops and practice changes in the Church – always has and always will until Christ Jesus comes again.

    If there must be a debate, the question should be: Is joining with Our Mother in pondering in our hearts the signal events in the earthly ministry of Christ Jesus a good thing or not? A very good thing.

    Anyway, the CD sounds wonderful. I have no doubt it will encourage even more folks to begin praying the Rosary. Personally, I say my Rosary prayers in Latin and teach my religious education students to do the same. This CD may be a great teaching tool, as well. God bless.

  32. Jason says:

    Can Latin be thought of as a sort of “sacramental”? Of course, the Rosary is the Rosary, whether in English or Latin. But for those who might not be inclined to pray privately in Latin for its cultural value, perhaps Latin could be recommended for a spiritual value.

  33. Geoffrey says:

    “I find it sad that so many want to berate the late Holy Father and the Luminous Mysteries.”

    I agree. You can’t imagine the hate mail I received after publishing them in a book. I mean, if you don’t like them, just turn the page! They are OPTIONAL.

  34. Rob F. says:

    I am with you Geoffrey. In fact, last time I checked, the joyful, sorrowful, and glorious mysteries were optional too. The whole rosary is optional!

    That said, this is definitely going on my birthday wish list. Thanks for the heads up, Father Z.

    -Rob

  35. Michael J says:

    If meditation on the luminous mysteries while reciting the Rosary is truly optional, it follows that there must be legitimate reasons why an individual would choose not to exercise that option.

    Why is it then that there is such thinly veiled contempt shown as soon as some of those reasons are listed?
    Why are those opposed to this change immediately labeled as hateful, or less devout, or ignorant?

  36. Daniel says:

    It seems odd to me that so many who are in favor of the Luminous Mysteries are so ready to attack those who either feel uncomfortable praying them (for whatever reason) or for bringing up possible reasons (historical, “pious legends”, advice from previous popes, etc…) why they should not be essentially declared mandatory. Like many have said already, the entire Rosary is “optional.” If that is the case, there is absolutely nothing wrong with not saying a portion of it. I think we all need to be a little more charitable with these types of discussions; not just those “nasty traditionalists” but also those who disagree with them.

    I think (pray?) we all have the same goal – reaching heaven with as many of our fellow men as possible – but vitriol does nothing but hamper the attainment of that goal for everybody.

  37. Steve says:

    Yeah! The real traditionalist should only pray 150 Pater Nosters and that’s it. Yeah! Just kidding;)

  38. Jordanes says:

    Michael J asked: Why is it then that there is such thinly veiled contempt shown as soon as some of those reasons are listed?
    Why are those opposed to this change immediately labeled as hateful, or less devout, or ignorant?

    I can’t answer those questions. I only know that nobody in this discussion has done the things you (and Daniel, for that matter) mention.

  39. Yes, the Rosary is a matter of private devotion…I know that for myself, I stick with the Traditional 3 sets of Mysteries. I don’t hate the Luminous Mysteries, I just don’t use them for my own personal devotion. If I’m praying them in public with people, and the people are leading the rosary are using them, I will pray them.

    I don’t see why all the fuss about a private devotion. Now if there was a change to the Liturgical prayer (which there was) then that’s a reason to “fuss” over.

  40. athanasius says:

    In my opinion, anyone who hates the Luminous Mysteries in res is a fool, since they are mysteries from the life of our Sacred Redeemer. The issue which irritates opponents of the addition is the fact that something eminently Traditional, like the liturgy, sacraments, theological expression, etc. had to be tinkered with to do it. It would have been fine promoted as a chaplet.

    What I find more distressing is that people are so disconnected from the heritage of papal teaching that it seems as though JPII were the first person to write on the rosary, when Pope Leo XIII wrote many times what JPII did on the subject, and in my opinion much more beautifully.

  41. athanasius says:

    I made a typo, it should be in re not res.

  42. Tom Ryan says:

    If you don’t want to use the Luminious Mysteries, you don’t have to.
    Comment by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf — 20 August 2008 @ 2:50 pm

    Great advise Father. But the problem remains that there are those who say you MUST, just because it’s Thursday!

  43. newtrad says:

    I’m sure people thought St. Dominic(or whomever you want to believe inspired it’s use)was tinkering with the old psalter but somehow it caught on. It amazes me that good people like yourselves can get so bent over something the great JP2 has given to us as a gift. To provide us with “light” in such dark times, how inspired of him. Yet some of you might consider it a sin. OY! I think Fr. Z said it best, don’t like it, don’t pray it!

  44. Given all the above, I stand completely behind what I wrote at 11:40am (not to mention whatever Athanasius wrote), having taken care in my choice of words, and with no ill will toward those who choose to embellish a traditional practice.

    The above should not be construed as “berating” the late pontiff.

  45. Carlos Palad says:

    The question of the Rosary was what helped me to decide between the Baronius and
    Angelus Missals. In the end, I chose the Baronius Missal and endorsed it to others
    partly because it contains the Luminous Mysteries.

  46. Tiny says:

    I bought the Pope John Paul II rosary, I’ll buy the Pope Benedict rosary, and I’ll buy the Father Z. rosary when that one comes out too.

  47. Geoffrey says:

    “But the problem remains that there are those who say you MUST, just because it’s Thursday!”

    I’ve never heard or read anyone saying this. All I hear is the Luminous Mysteries constantly being bashed. Who has said they “must” be said?

  48. Mark M says:

    Maybe we can get back to the subject at hand, which is not the Luminous Mysteries!

    Anyone know if it would be okay to write in English to the Vatican Radio address? And would one just send them credit card number, or what?

  49. Mark M: Wouldn’t recommend sending a
    credit card number by e-mail. Not safe
    at all.
    As secure in fact as a postcard.

  50. Gregor says:

    Mark, why don’t you simply try writing to them in English, asking how payment would work, and see what happens.

  51. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    I’ve emailed the Vatican Radio address in English, saying I want to buy the set and asking how I can pay for it securely. Will post again, if and when I receive a reply. Thanks Mrk M for getting us back on the subject in hand!
    Jane

  52. avecrux says:

    Thanks for telling us about this CD, Father. I would really like to get a copy. I’m thrilled that it is in Latin and I will use it with my own children and hopefully even introduce it at CCD. When it comes straight from the Holy Father, it makes it more difficult for people to complain. (More difficult – not impossible!)

    On the side note, I like the Luminous Mysteries a lot, especially the Institution of the Eucharist – and it always reminds me to pray especially for Priests on Thursday. Having said that, if I’m having a really bad day on a Thursday, I’ll just say the Sorrowful… I’ve never heard that you must meditate on any mysteries in particular.

  53. Mark M says:

    Thanks, Jane! Do please let us all know.

  54. Baron Korf says:

    **
    “But the problem remains that there are those who say you MUST, just because it’s Thursday!”

    I’ve never heard or read anyone saying this. All I hear is the Luminous Mysteries constantly being bashed. Who has said they “must” be said?
    Comment by Geoffrey — 20 August 2008 @ 10:47 pm
    **
    EWTN hosts
    Comment by Tom in Columbus — 20 August 2008 @ 11:24 pm
    **

    Actually I recently heard Fr. Mitch Pacwa say the exact opposite. Since it’s a private devotion, there is no requirement to say any given mystery on any given day of the week. He mentioned that the nuns when he was in grade school recommened choosing the Sunday mystery based on the liturgical season. He added that the luminous mysteries, or Mysteries of Light as some call them, fit in very well with Ordinary Time. He closed with saying its a private devotion as you have the freedom to use what mysterious you like when you like, but that following the sugguested ones gives a sense of unity with the other people praying the rosary on that same day.

  55. Calleva says:

    What a wonderful initiative to produce a recording of our Holy Father saying the rosary! And four CDs would be great for a long car journey – you let him lead, so no need for beads (safer while driving)… I do hope that this recording will be made widely available.

    As to the Luminous Mysteries – I always felt that the jump between the Finding of the Child Jesus and the Agony in the Garden a bit too great so I love the Luminous Mysteries. As has been commented, there are many chaplets and rosaries around – next month is the month of the Seven Sorrows of Our Lady and there is a chaplet – seven sets of seven Aves, one set for each Sorrow.

    As to the Rosary, there is, as Father says, no hard and fast rule about what mysteries you say and when. There was a time in my life when I said the rosary without meditating on any mysteries. Last Friday was the feast of the Queenship of Mary, as readers here will know. After Mass three of us said the Glorious Mysteries.

    All this presupposes that one says one 5-decade Rosary a day. During a vacation with a lot of driving, as a passenger I ran privately through several Rosaries and Divine Mercy chaplets. Padre Pio chided one of his spiritual children that in saying one daily rosary he ‘wasn’t trying hard enough’ – the Padre always had beads in his hands and must have run through many each day (though apparently it isn’t known if he said the rosary exactly in the way we do). What to do if one says more than four mysteries? I think we can be a bit legalistic about it – Pope John Paul offered the Luminous Mysteries but he didn’t insist on them.

    Incidentally, on the subject of the Rosary, the one that Bernadette had at Lourdes is said to have had six decades – which was common in her region of France. The sixth decade is said for the Holy Souls. One can buy such rosaries in the area around Lourdes.

  56. Antiquarian, MA, MFA, PhD says:

    “Who has said they “must” be said?
    Comment by Geoffrey — 20 August 2008 @ 10:47 pm

    **

    EWTN hosts
    Comment by Tom in Columbus — 20 August 2008 @ 11:24 pm”

    Which hosts? When and in what context?

  57. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    For Mark M. Sorry no response from Vatican Radio yet about ordering the 4CD set, but it is the weekend. Maybe next week ….. ?
    Regards,
    Jane

  58. Mark M says:

    Absolutely Jane, no worries!

  59. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    Mark and anyone else interested. Just had a reply from Vatican Radio at 11.30am French time this morning. I quote:
    ‘The price of the CDs is 17 euros including postage. Payment by bank transfer, you’ll find our IBAN code in the parcel. If you wish to receive the CDs, please send us by email your address.
    Sincerely, Elisabett Vitalini
    Vatican Radio Promotions Office’

    So there you are! I’ll let you know when my set arrives. In the meantime get writing to Elisabetta in English (English has proved to be perfectly OK)at promo@vatiradio.va
    Bank transfer should be alright from the States but they may add extra postage. Really surprised they’re prepared to send out before payment, but if that’s their system then great!
    God bless,
    Jane

  60. Matt Q says:

    Michael J ( no Fox in there, just kidding ) wrote:

    “If anyone is truly interested in why many “traditionalists” object to the luminous mysteries, here’s just a few:

    Pope Paul VI addressed a similar issue during his pontificate. He responded by saying:

    “The faithful would conclude that the Pope has changed the Rosary, and the psychological effect would be disastrous… Any change in it cannot but lessen the confidence of the simple and the poor…The Rosary is to remain single in form and unchanged from what it is now. Let any new forms of Marian devotion take their place alongside the Rosary”

    Additionally, in Marialis Cultus, Pope Paul VI teaches that the traditional triune form of the Rosary canonized by Pope St. Pius V—3 groups of mysteries and three groups of 50 Hail Mary’s, corresponding to the 150 psalms in the Psalter—is wisely prescribed by the Magisterium as the best expression of the Christological aspect of the devotion.

    The traditional form of the Rosary was canonized by Pope St. Pius V in his bull Consueverunt

    The Rosary was instituted by Saint Dominic around 1206, under a divine inspiration according to Pope Leo XIII in Supremi Apostolatus Officio.

    The normal cycle of Joyful, Sorrowful, Glorious (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday respectively) is thrown out of whack. The 15 promises of Mary for those who promote the rosary is diminished. The Fatima message becomes confused. It is a novelty and the change (some would say tampering) to a time honored and beautiful prayer for no discernable compelling reason. It presumes that for centuries, the Church has promoted a deficient prayer.”

    )(

    Sounds good enough. Stick to the fifteen-decade Rosary and be done with it. If there is an attachment to the Luminous ones, then pray it as an aside from the regular cycle of the Rosary.

  61. Marcus says:

    I do. On Thursdays.

    It’s an interesting observation to read the above in total and see which Holy Fathers and which of their teachings we choose to listen to and which ones we do away with or brush aside. One can’t help but see the irony in pitting a statement from Pope Paul VI against a teaching of Pope John Paul II, especially in this crowd.

    Do you have to say the Luminous Mysteries? No. But isn’t the topic of this post that Vatican Radio is releasing a CD set of the Holy Father praying all 20 Rosary Mysteries?

    Angelus Press offers a book, “The New Rosary” by Christopher Ferrara whose blurb suggests that Pope John Paul II has introduced poison into the Church with the introduction of the Luminous Mysteries:

    “Not content with his central role in the disastrous “liturgical renewal” of Pope Paul VI, Annibale Bugnini also proposed to rearrange the Rosary, in a September, 1972 schema he submitted to the Congregation for Divine Worship. Pope Paul VI responded to this ridiculous proposal through the Vatican Secretary of State: “[T]he faithful would conclude that ‘the Pope has changed the Rosary, and the psychological effect would be disastrous….Any change in it cannot but lessen the confidence of the simple and the poor.” And yet, in 2002, Pope John Paul II changed the Rosary. Why?”

    It wasn’t worth $7 + shipping to me to find out.

  62. Marcus says:

    Note that Pope John Paul II in his Apostolic Letter “Rosario Virinis Mariae” doesn’t pit pope against pope as others do, but builds a case and a deepening understanding of what the Rosary is and what it is for; that is, what it tends toward. Apparently, it is at para. 19 where the dangerous “tinkering” begins and also the notion that the Luminous Mysteries are optional (given that the whole Rosary is optional to one’s peril). The whole document is beautiful and worthy of much contemplation (he addresses pretty much every concern listed in above posts), but para. 28 offers this compelling thought:

    “In effect, the Rosary is simply a method of contemplation. As a method, it serves as a means to an end and cannot become an end in itself. All the same, as the fruit of centuries of experience, this method should not be undervalued. In its favour one could cite the experience of countless Saints. This is not to say, however, that the method cannot be improved. Such is the intent of the addition of the new series of mysteria lucis to the overall cycle of mysteries and of the few suggestions which I am proposing in this Letter regarding its manner of recitation. These suggestions, while respecting the well-established structure of this prayer, are intended to help the faithful to understand it in the richness of its symbolism and in harmony with the demands of daily life. Otherwise there is a risk that the Rosary would not only fail to produce the intended spiritual effects, but even that the beads, with which it is usually said, could come to be regarded as some kind of amulet or magic object, thereby radically distorting their meaning and function.”

    The Holy Father has taught that the Rosary is not unchangeable simply because it is the Rosary; it is only a tool to bring you to deeper contemplation of and union with Christ, and that the Mysteria Lucis empower it even more.

  63. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    Mark,
    IBAN = International banking code number. Glad to see your post on Rise and Pray. Thanks for the ack. Have updated Fr Z by email but understandably he may have been too busy with the Pelosi thing to have noticed it yet.

  64. Hoka2_99 says:

    I bought this set of CDs in Rome in June and I believe they were released a couple of months before that. Yes, the Luminous Mysteries are included. In my opinion these complete the story of Christ’s life. The Rosary in Latin is beautiful. This is hardly just a passing fashion; Latin is and always will be the official language of the Church.

  65. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    My set arrived today. I haven’t got Pope John Paul’s set so my comments are not comparisons.
    Yes it’s beautiful in Latin particularly the way Pope Benedict speaks it. For example, the way he says ‘Spiritu Sancto’ is a prayer in itself.
    He is steady, deeply reverent, totally lacking in any ostentation, and full of love for the Holy Trinity and our Blessed Mother. I’ve just prayed the Sorrowful Mysteries with him and it really helped me to keep recollected. It will be part of my daily routine from now on.

    As to the recording quality and general atmosphere, it sounds as if it was recorded in a amall oratory with a small choir who also supply the Rosary responses. It feels as if he’s only a few feet away from you and he sounds as if he’s with his family. Perfect for use at home, would help too with teaching your kids the Latin. Anyway I found it evoked the perfect mood. Bonuses are the Litany of Our Lady and his Papal blessing, at the end of the first disc. I hope it’s the same on the others. There are no case notes. Perhaps printing the Latin would have pushed up production costs too highly.
    Mane nobiscum, Donine.
    Jane

  66. Jane Fulthorpe says:

    Mea maxima culpa, DoMine
    J

  67. levavi says:

    My copy has just arrived!!!

  68. Mark M says:

    Mine arrived a few days back; now I’ve got to work out how to send them the money!

  69. Mark G. says:

    I received my set. Very pleased for the most part. The Holy Father’s voice is strong and sound as he leads the prayers. A small booklet came with it that includes the Latin texts of most of the prayers and hymns on the CD’s, but not all. There are no translations included.

    Now, regarding payment: my bank wanted $50 for an international wire transfer. Western Union wanted $20, but did not have a listing for Vatican City, so I think it would go to Italy, since the first digits of the IBAN number are “IT”. The included note says, “You can also pay with a check in the name of Vatican Radio to our address: Vatican Radio – 00120 Vatican City.” I think I’m going to try sending a check, but there are sure to be extra charges for that too – Caveat emptor!