Steubenville: Missa Cantata

I got some good news from Franciscan University at Steubenville.

Apparently they had a Missa Cantata in the older form.

From a reader:

These were from today’s Missa Cantata here at Steubenville.  Maybe your readers would like to see how we celebrate the Mass of All Ages. This is the e-mail from the holy priest of God who prayed the Mass.  It was Father’s first time praying the Missa Cantata.  He did wonderfully and there were almost 300 students who came.  It was so beautiful.  Our little Latin Mass community here is growing and becoming more and more integrated into the community-at large!  Keep praying for us!

Kudos to Father and the students!

It would be great to have reactions from student or faculty who participated.

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33 Responses to Steubenville: Missa Cantata

  1. George says:

    With all due respect, for the sake of clarity and honesty, and at the expense of having someone yawn at me again: Please refrain from referring to the EF mass as the “Latin Mass” (well, I am aware you didn’t actually do that here) and please correct those who do. Thank you, George

  2. Ann says:

    I am deeply touched by the increasing diversity and reverence in the Mass, both the Ordinary and the Extraordinary. The richness of our Liturgical heritage needs to be enjoyed by people today and this is an example of a correct use of that heritage.

    Bravo Steubenville! I wish I could have been a student there. :)

  3. Brandon says:

    George,

    It simply seems to be convention to use the term “Latin Mass Community” as opposed to “The association of lay persons from a particular area who appreciate the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite”. It’s a colloquial and comfortable term. Ease off. It’s alright to call the Mass which may only be celebrated in Latin, a Latin Mass.

    And Father, the Mass went wonderfully. The servers, though most of them had never served a TLM before, or had only served one, did a great job, particularly the acolytes. We had a few.. incidents where some of our torch Bearers felt faint, and the acolytes stepped in and took care of them, and assumed their positions during Communion. (It was only Father-Presider to give communion to the multitudes who came to pray, so it took a while)

    And if you look to the left, the first man you see there in a Cassock, is a seminarian of the Society of the Holy Cross from Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana.

    At any rate, there was lots of incense, and a beautiful Schola. Thanks for your support Father, and that of your readers!

  4. Mitch#2 says:

    Good Luck and God Bless the community…The best news is how well attended it was and that it is growing and integrating into the Church as a whole. That is encouraging..This Priest has given a gift to the parishoners by offering his first Mass in their Church. I hope many follow in his footsteps and the atmosphere of fear and reprisal evaporates into thin air.

  5. Terth says:

    Which priest offered the Mass? And what did his email say?

  6. Nick says:

    I’m glad to see Stubenville is getting its act together!

  7. Brandon says:

    Father’s name is Fr. John Larson, MIC (from the same community as Fr. Don Calloway)

    And the e-mail was just a short note that said these were some pictures from the Mass and that it went well.

    As a side note, Father has also begun offering our weekly TLM on Saturdays at 8am. Father alternates with one of the Friars here on campus, and actually two other friars are excited to be learning Latin and how to pray this Mass.

  8. TJM says:

    The young will save the Church yet! This is spectacular. Tom

  9. Basil says:

    Correction: the seminarian belongs to the Congregation of Holy Cross (CSC), not the Society of the Holy Cross. Thanks!

    Blessed Basil Moreau, pray for us.
    Blessed Andre Bessette, pray for us.
    Our Lady of Sorrows, pray for us.

  10. Brandon says:

    hah! Yes, corrected, am I. I’m sure I’ll get it from him later today anyways!

  11. josephus muris saliensis says:

    So wonderful to see the EF being celebrated in a modern setting. Taken with Gregor Kollmorgen’s blog on the 15th century vestments at Halberstadt, (http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2008/10/treasure-of-halberstadt-ii.html may i do that?) which are still useable for their sacred purpose, it gives a wonderful picture of the MASS OF AGES, and the gentle flow of Tradition through the ages of the Saints.

    Pope Benedict would be delighted – this is exactly the character of the sacred liturgy he is demonstrating in Rome.

  12. Katie says:

    I just wanted to say that I LOVED THE MASS SOOO MUCH! I was smiling with joy the whole entire mass. I really wish we could have a high mass on campus every week. That would be AMAZING! It’s so beautiful to have people my age helping out with the mass and to see other students actually interested in the Extraordinary form. There were lots of veils there! :)

  13. Juliana Maria says:

    A good friend of mine who is a freshman at Steubenville told me how much she loved the Missa Cantata there. This was only her second TLM. She would certainly agree with Katie’s comment. If people – especially youth – are only given the opportunity to experience the sublime Mass of the Ages we shall see a great increase in devotion to and enthusiasm for the extraordinary form of the Mass. Praise God for Summorum Pontificum!

  14. Matt Q says:

    This is great. Prayerful persistence really does work. Just a year ago there were acrimonious denials from the college. Now they are actually celebrating the Tridentine Mass.

    Not seeing the rest of it, as an aside, that looks like a converted movie theater. A couple of our theaters here look just like that.

  15. Brian says:

    George, I think this gets to what Father was saying about not threading on issues that aren’t germane to the topic at hand. But since you brought it up, “Yawn.” We call things by the most readily available, easiest terms possible. Hence, people call the EF the “Latin” Mass because they never experience Latin in the Mass any other way (and more’s the pity). So it’s not technically correct. So the Novus Ordo is also the Latin Mass, properly understood. What difference does it make? There are so many bigger fish to fry, dude.

  16. newtrad says:

    So great to see this. We know so many great kids who attend that school. Our family has always been attracted to the school but we knew there was no TLM, which makes our children not want to attend. How great is this! I have to say I wish the chapel were more ornate but I know that doesn’t truly matter. It just enhances the experience for us..

  17. Suzanne says:

    I never thought I’d see the day — I’m so happy to be wrong! :)

  18. I too am happy to see Stuebenville graduate to the big league. You can’t keep a good school down. Many of the students there drive all the way into Pittsburgh to counsel and witness at the abortionist’s killing facility.

  19. ED says:

    Cardinal Hoyos says in a recent interview that at the VATICAN they call the EXTRAORDINARY RITE , the GREGORIAN RITE, since it goes back basically unchanged to ST. Gregory the Great ,i think in the late 300s or early 400s Anno Domine

  20. Mike the Tiger says:

    Dear Father Z.
    Good news from Florida’s Treasure Coast! For more than a dozen years,
    the TLM has been celebrated at Saint Martin de Porres Church in Jensen Beach, Florida, which is about 45 minutes north of West Palm Beach. The celebrant, Father de Leon, has made available to all attendees a CD of the Traditional Mass that was made by the FSSP. He recently
    concluded a lecture series on Monday evenings explaining the history of the Mass and
    its prayers. Just yesterday (10/19) he announced that the pastor had approved the
    purchase of a high altar for use at the TLM. This altar should be installed by the
    end of the year. (Now it’s up to the TLM congregation to help pay for it!). The Sunday before,
    a reporter and photographer came to do a story on the Mass and interviewed some of
    the congregants, including yours truly. I will send the article when it comes out.
    God Bless and keep up the great work!!

    Mike

    P.S. Father Z, when you have time, could you post a comment or two about the
    so-called “preferential option for the poor”. Is this a part of Catholic doctrine
    or a post-Vatican II interpretation of Church teaching?

  21. Kyle says:

    Fr Z,

    I’m a first semester graduate theology student here in Steubenville, and this Sunday’s Mass was the second Extraordinary Form High Mass that I’ve had the pleasure of attending on campus. Prior to coming here, I attended an FSSP parish in my home town – so I’m used to the older rite. This Sunday was wonderful because so many of my friends here were experiencing the beauty of the EF for the first time. There were a few times where I had to discreetly point out in the missal where we were for them, but the overwhelming impression they gave was one of being blown away. I understand that it was Fr John’s first time saying the EF Mass, and he did wonderfully. You can really tell that the friars here have taken the attitude that if something is worth doing, it’s worth doing right.

    Kyle

  22. Fr. J says:

    I love Franciscan U! Just wish they would build a new chapel. Christ the King is so dated and no longer fits the beauty of the campus.

  23. Matt Q says:

    Fr J wrote:

    “I love Franciscan U! Just wish they would build a new chapel. Christ the King is so dated and no longer fits the beauty of the campus.”

    )(

    So true on that, Father. Maybe they could take a cue from Thomas Aquinas College out here in Santa Paula, CA. Beautiful!! It will be a beacon when it’s finally dedicated. It would probably be a most interesting moment to for our Cardinal to dedicate–if he’s invited or still around by then.

  24. Kevin A. says:

    I’m very glad to see this from my alma mater. I think they’ve realized the value of returning reverence and beauty to the liturgy.
    Just over the past year or two there has been a huge change. I remember many professors openly mocking people’s desire to have the Mass in Latin. I could tell that there was a large group of people who did want it, though, and it’s amazing to see how this movement has taken shape in so short a time. Praise God!

  25. Mary Ann, Singing Mum says:

    This is great news! I know a former director of a schola at Steubenville and she asserted that they community was always held on the ‘fringe’. After SP, these good people are finally able to grow and integrate into the larger community. Super.

    George, while you came out swinging and a bit off-topic, I am dismayed by the reaction of otherwise savvy Catholics and must come to your defense. As a proponent of the OF in Latin, I also think terms matter. That’s why I follow the pope’s lead and use the terms he uses in SP.

  26. Glory to Jesus Christ!

    How wonderful! God grant the Latin Mass Community at FUS many happy and blessed years!

    In ICXC,

    Fr. Deacon Daniel, FUS Alum

  27. Miseno says:

    As an alumnus, I am so happy that Steubenville has finally accepted those attached to tradition by letting them use the chapel. Only 5 years ago, you couldn’t have dreamed to have a TLM in CKC. Awesome.

  28. Mary Jane says:

    We are seeing so many things we never dreamed would happen – the Extraordinary Form at Steubenville, Eucharistic Processions at Notre Dame, etc. There were committed people, mostly lay, who worked and prayed for this for years. The Holy Father has done (and does) so much. And we may see more good things ahead liturgically. All of which are a reminder that we should never despair.

  29. This is the priest in the picture. I’ve had a blog for years and it has been, for the most part, a quiet little corner that only a few have visited. Well, with this mention on the super-popular WDTPRS, I am going to list it here and see what happens. Keep in mind, however, that it isn’t going to be a rad-trad sort of blog.

    If I start to get “out of control” comments, I’ll probably just shut the blog down. Mine was never meant to be popular.

    http://micbro.cybercatholics.com

    Fr. John Larson, MIC

  30. Teresa says:

    This is awesome! As an FUS alum, I have been hoping for a return to traditional liturgy. I’m not really surprised, because the teaching there is orthodox – if you TEACH receptive students to follow the Holy Father, then they will want to do it. They will wonder why their classes teach the true faith but the liturgy does not follow the documents. I don’t believe that most friars and professors are against the Extraordinary form (especially the younger ones, of course.) They desire to follow Christ and His Church, but have their faults as do we all. This desire makes them able to convert to His desire over time. That’s why Summorum Pontificum is such a gift – it clarifies what has been confused, deliberately and otherwise, for those who want to follow.

    All the liturgies are celebrated with love and enthusiasm, but not necessarily correctly. Hopefully the Ordinary form will be celebrated with greater faithfulness as well.

    I must add, that though the chapel at FUS is ugly (with the exception of the San Damiano crucifix) and I’m longing to get a letter raising funds for a new, beautiful one – don’t forget that many students (including myself) have come to understand and love the Mass anew here. Thank God for the faith that is there, and pray for the reverence in people’s hearts to be expressed in the outward form of the Mass.

  31. Teresa,

    Agreed. Not to mention the fact that the Chapel, which is intended architecturally to signify the Crown of Christ the King (the name of the chapel) is also the logo of the University and a recognized “brand”, so they will be unlikely to change it any time soon.

    Certain things could be done in the chapel to enhance its liturgical beauty, beginning with iconography in the traditional Franciscan style, such as that of the Basilica of Saint Francis:

    http://bp0.blogger.com/_Z8F47EdZ94Y/SE5UzfwfgXI/AAAAAAAAC9Y/jw-dEJkICNY/s1600-h/Assisi_Altare_Basilica_inferiore.jpg

    It could include replicas of the icons from the basilica of the life of the Poverello on one side and St. Clare on the other.

    The tabernacle could also be restored to the sanctuary, especially to the altar table. The side Eucharistic chapel is no longer necessary with the Portciuncula as well as the various Eucharistic chapels spread out throughout the campus in the dorms.

    God bless,

    Fr. Deacon Daniel

  32. MargoB says:

    Nick,

    A gentle reminder: Franciscan U ‘has its act together’ in many ways; allowing the celebration of the EF is not the only criterion of Catholics having their act together.

  33. Peter V says:

    Whenever the Extraordinary Form of the Mass is not offered on campus I, along with several others, make the 40-some mile journey down to St. Boniface in Pittsburgh so as to participate in the Extraordinary Form there.

    That said, I have had the honor of being present at all of the Masses in the Extraordinary Form that have been offered on this campus. There were two offered last spring, before the end of the semester, and there have been two thus far this semester, with another one coming up on November 9th. 0

    The Mass celebrated this past Sunday was the best one so far, with minor difficulties (such as only one Ordinary Minister of Holy Communion being present, thus prolonging communion to the point that the torch-bearers and a few members of the congregation passed out). Many kudos to Father John Larson!

    Now all we need is a forum for those who have familiarity with this most excellent liturgy to share their knowledge with those who are less familiar with what is happening!

    FYI (for those in the area), St. Boniface (in Pittsburgh) will be celebrating a Missa Solemnis this Sunday in honor of the Solemnity of Christ the King. I strongly encourage as many people as possible to attend this beautiful celebration!