PODCAzT 82: St. Joseph: a hymn dissected and a sermon of St. Bernardine of Siena

Happy Name Day Holy Father!

In this rapid PODCAzT, we will drill into a beautiful Gregorian chant hymn to St. Joseph in the Liturgia Horarum, the Liturgy of the Hours.

The hymn is Te, Ioseph celebrent and it is in the Liber Hymnarius for 1st and 2nd Vespers for the Feast of St. Joseph.

Also we listen to an indulgenced prayer written by Pope Leo XIII, Ad Te Ioseph.

Finally, we hear St. Bernardine of Siena (+1444) preach on our Patron of the Universal Church who is Patron of the dying.

Sing along with the hymns! Buy a Liber Hymnarius!

http://www.wdtprs.com/podcazt/09_03_19.mp3

 

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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13 Responses to PODCAzT 82: St. Joseph: a hymn dissected and a sermon of St. Bernardine of Siena

  1. Andrew, UK and sometimes Canada says:

    Thank you for the Latin for the Ad Te Ioseph Reverend Father. This appears in the Baronius Press Missal (p. 55) but only in English, and with some minor variations in translation. It does note Pope Leo’s authorship and the attached indulgence.

  2. Immaculatae says:

    Thank you,Father Z! This is a wonderful gift!

  3. Sean Caron says:

    HMMMM, St. Bernadine of Siena, huh?

    is this a hint at who you believe will win the 8-9 game in the NCAA tournament from Dayton tomorrow, Father?

    I am a graduate of Siena College, whose patron saint is, of course, St. Bernadine.

    And their team name is the Saints. [You found me out.]

  4. Jonathan says:

    I too recognized the Ad Te Ioseph from my Baronius Press Missal. I have often wondered about the meaning of the phrase “the inheritance which Jesus Christ has purchased with his blood”. Can anyone explain it to me?

    Thank you Father again for the series, and the prayer casts too. They are such a Godsend on my frequent business travel – enabling me to stay connected to the body of Christ when it is easy to drift.

  5. Kaneohe says:

    Fr. Z, many thanks for another superb podcast!

    Jonathan, I always understood our inheritance is eternal salvation and life “through and in Christ” That by His death and resurrection we come to share in His divinity as we have been reconciled in and through Christ to the Father and so we are co-heir with the Son.

    Paul to the Galatians, Chapter 4:4-7
    ” My point is this: heirs, as long as they are minors, are no better than slaves, though they are the owners of all the property; but they remain under guardians and trustees until the date set by the father. So with us; while we were minors, we were enslaved to the elemental spirits* of the world. But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, ‘Abba! Father!’ So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God. (RSV)

    To the Ephisians 1.17-19 “I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power. (RSV)

    There are other mentions in Paul and John’s Revelation concerning our inhertitance and how we are co-heirs and sons of God.

    Hope this helps!

    Grace and peace.

  6. Jonathan says:

    Dear Kaneohe:

    Thank you very much for taking the time to respond to my question. In the prayer we are discussing, the full phrase is “we beseech thee to look kindly upon the inheritance which Jesus Christ acquired by His precious bllod”. In others words, look kindly upon us as the inheritance he purchased with his blood?

  7. Seminarian says:

    I have to admit that I was very disappointed while praying the English-language “Liturgy of the Hours” on the Solemnity of St. Joseph. I can’t, for the life of me, figure out why the beautiful Gregorian hymns of old were replaced with the bland ones that the Church now makes us pray in the English breviary.

    Please, please, bring back the TE JOSEPH CELEBRENT!

    This is one of the reasons (among others) why I am considering “converting” to the 1962 Breviary: the hymns are so much more capable of elevating the soul to God.

  8. Kaneohe says:

    Jonathan, the prayer is addresed to Saint Joseph and we are the petitioners “To thee…we fly in our tribulation…with confidence we ask also for thy intercession..”

    The phrase you are asking about also deals with our praying for Saint Joseph’s intercession
    “…we beseech thee to look kindly upon the inheritance which Jesus Christ acquired by His precious blood, and with thy powerful aid to help us in our needs.”

    Since I don’t have the original Latin prayer I am assuming that Pope Leo was identifying the faithful as the inheritance. The prayer seems to follow that logic and also the Scriptural sense of inheritance/co-heirs. We ask Saint Joseph to look kindly upon the inheritance (us) and to help us in our needs.

    Don’t you agree this would be a good phrase/prayer for Fr. Z, with all his wonderful scholarly knowledge, to dissect and explain?

    Perhaps someone else could join in and offer their understanding?

  9. liebemama says:

    This was beautiful! I doubt any one had to “suffer” your chanting of the hymn. You did a fine job.

  10. Mark M says:

    We sung Te Joseph on Thursday at the first of hopefully many regular old rite Vespers in the Cathedral here in Edinburgh. I really enjoy singing that hmyn, so I’m awfully pleased that the next time will be for 1st Vespers of St Joseph the Worker and we have an opportunity to sing it again!

    I’ll ask around and see if anyone can video liturgical goodness. (Probably not, but worth a shot.)

  11. Make me a Spark says:

    Father never apologize for your voice it is very nice! thank you!

  12. martin says:

    Thanks Father for another excellent podcast.

  13. Carolyn says:

    A belated thank you for another wonderful podcazt! And I enjoyed the singing! :-)