Rome Update: Of chasubles and cheese

Even though we have apparently now moved into a time when nothing can be beautiful again in the liturgy and we are entirely focused on cars with at least 100k miles, market forces are till at work in Rome.

I stopped at Leoniana bookstore and saw that they are now selling the scudi with the papal stemma that you will see over the doorways of Roman churches and sundry other buildings.  Two sizes.  I love the free market.

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By the cash register, which is where savvy shopkeepers put things that are selling, we find…

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And a resource for the older form of Mass.

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I stopped at a clerical shop to find more linen collars and, lo and behold, what do I spy in the window?

Not shabby at all.

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It is machine stitched but… who cares?

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The answer is, “Yes, I want it.”  The question is, “Are there matching dalmatic, tunic, cope and humeral veil?”

And just because I thought you needed a glimpse of some cheese I shared with a friend.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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17 Responses to Rome Update: Of chasubles and cheese

  1. Sid Cundiff in NC says:

    Is this the place?:
    Libreria Leoniana
    Via dei Corridori 28
    Rome, 00193
    Italy

    I’ll have to drop in if and when I am again in Rome. Thanks.

  2. Dr. Edward Peters says:

    I like the Freudian slip: “market forces are till at work” Get it? Till? As in, cash till…. :)

  3. yatzer says:

    Lovely chasuble, but I could personally and truly use that cheese myself!

  4. teomatteo says:

    Is that cheese or Penicillin?

  5. disco says:

    On traditional mass books selling better: you don’t need books when you’re making it up as you go along.

  6. APX says:

    Apparently, according to a very old Hungarian priest, if you eat a slice of toast with blue cheese and a clove of garlic crushed on top of it every day you will never get sick.

    Our Latin Mass community ordered a full set (all the colors) of uber pricey vestments “of the highest quality fabric” from some place in Rome almost a year ago. We’re still waiting. Hopefully we’ll have rose vestments in time from the third week in Advent this year.

  7. Elizabeth D says:

    Oh dear Father Z, a set of those would be nice, what does the TMSM have in its coffers? Not that much I am sure! lol

    You should get a nice cassock for the “pastoral year” seminarian at my parish who does everything in an ugly polyester alb with no cincture. Even if the little servers are in cassock and surplice as is normal in this parish, the seminarian insists on alb with no cincture. I have no idea what is the meaning of this.

  8. Eric says:

    “a glimpse of some cheese ”

    My day is complete.

  9. rbbadger says:

    “Even though we have apparently now moved into a time when nothing can be beautiful again in the liturgy and we are entirely focused on cars with at least 100k miles, market forces are till at work in Rome.”

    One thing which emerged from the interview of the Holy Father in America was that he is a man of very good taste when it comes to music. He loves the Furtwängler interpretations of Beethoven and Wagner. Damian Thompson was delighted to find that the Pope’s knowledge of classical music was so detailed that Pope Francis that in Damian Thompson’s words, the Pope could well host BBC3’s Building a Library. He also has good taste in art and literature. He has great affection for the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins, SJ and the German poet Friedrich Hölderlin. Likewise, in the realm of the visual arts, he has great esteem for Caravaggio. So, he has good taste in music, literature, and art. He is a cultured man. Why does this not extend to the liturgy?

  10. JonPatrick says:

    And I thought the British had cornered the market in Mouldy Cheese :)

    APX, that trick of the toast with blue cheese and garlic works because no one will come near enough to you to pass on whatever germs they are carrying. :)

  11. Scott W. says:

    Pardon my disagreeableness, but I don’t care for that chasuble. The rounded square corners remind me too much of a dinner-table placemat and the gold trim forming a rectangle in the middle is gratuitous.

  12. sacerdosinaeternum says:

    While in Rome about 3 weeks ago, I noticed the great majority of the churches do not yet have the scudi on their facade. Perhaps the store is encouraging the Catholic Faithful to buy one and bring it to their “church of choice”! :)

  13. Ed the Roman says:

    In re caseum (?):

    Yum.

  14. gjp says:

    I wanted to see what one of those looked like above a door. Fortunately, His Eminence Cardinal O’Malley of Boston has a photo on his blog:

    http://www.cardinalseansblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/11162008rome-0021.jpg

    This is his titular church in Rome, and the photo is from 2008, with the coat of arms of Pope Benedict XVI and Cardinal O’Malley.

  15. Michael_Thoma says:

    APX says:
    23 October 2013 at 8:53 pm

    Apparently, according to a very old Hungarian priest, if you eat a slice of toast with blue cheese and a clove of garlic crushed on top of it every day you will never get sick.It also helps ward off any illness caused by meeting Count Drakulya!

  16. Margaret says:

    Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese. (GKC)

    But that particular chunk is surely worth at least a limerick or a haiku or something, don’t you think?

  17. The Cobbler says:

    I’m always surprised Chesterton said that, given that he of all people was into things like nursery rhymes and so many of those feature cheese prominently, don’t they? The cheese stands alone, the cheese stands alone, hi ho the dairy-o…