A prayer for the translators

One of the frequent participants in the blog, Martin, made a proposal about composing a prayer for those involved in the creation of a new English translation of the Missale Romanum.  I think this is a good idea.  The aforementioned Martin then posted a prayer in English.  I called for a Latin version and he put his money where is Shift Key is located and posted a Latin version.

Folks, I invite YOU to come up with your own prayers for the people involved in the translation process.  Post them here as comments.  

You don’t have to post them in Latin.  Since this is an English language issue, post in English.  If you are from a country where the process is going on (e.g., there is a new German version of the Missal underway), post in the relevant tongue.  Don’t think you have to post in Latin… but you can if you want!

Another thing.  When writing this prayer, keep in mind at this point that there have been a couple of draft translations already.  My spies tell me that one of the major things slowing the process is the constant submission of revisions by the USCCB.  And the revisions are not, for the most part, improvements in anyway I can think of.  So, the Holy See and Vox Clara, the ICEL team and the bishops conferences are the players in this.  The onus right now is on the conferences to finish their work.  That is what is slowing the process.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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3 Responses to A prayer for the translators

  1. Henry Edwards says:

    My spies tell me that one of the major things slowing the process is the constant submission of revisions by the USCCB. And the revisions are not, for the most part, improvements in anyway I can think of.

    Father Z: My own sources suggest that the USCCB liturgy committee appears only to be attempting to delay the translation process, rather than seeking actual improvements in the translation. Do you have any information to the contrary.

  2. Jeff says:

    “attempting to delay”

    Both the Benedict-Lovers and the Benedict-Haters seldom stop to really PROCESS the fact that the Pope could EASILY die tomorrow. It takes cold hard politicians to look that undoubted truth in the face and use it as part of their calculations. Or to remember that he may soon become tired and weak or even sick.

    We B-Lovers we would be STUNNED if we opened the papers tomorrow and read that the Pope had died. Why? I am haunted every day by the memory of his words right after election: “This brief pontificate.”

  3. I have it actually from the 2nd highest liturgical authority in Rome, and I do not mean some prof at a university, that the USCCB is slowing the process. I say cunctando regitur mundus.