Conclave concludes: Mass in the Sistine Chapel with Cardinals

His Holiness Pope Francis has begun his Mass in the Sistine Chapel with all the Cardinals. Thus we bring to an end the Conclave rites, though the conclave is officially over now. Some shots and comments (for as long a my battery lasts!).

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Well… that’s a rather abrupt change of style.

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It is always sad to see an versus populum altar in front of something so grand.

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The Holy Father had a real problem with the Latin Confiteor. But wonders when the last time was that he actually pronounced the Novus Ordo Confiteor. He is speaking all the prayers.
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Organ in the Sistine chapel…. o tempora, o mores.

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In the Sistina the Sistine sounds pretty good!

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Sorry about format problems.  The blog is giving problems.

I was amused to hear in the 1st reading from Isaiah, “the stone that was rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone”. Ironic, in that it is said that he was a strong second at the beginning of the 2005 conclave. Of course, His Holiness wanted to do something else with that passage.

One of the bidding prayers:

“For His Holiness Benedict XVI: may he serve the Church in hiddenness with a life dedicated to prayer and meditation.”

To my ear, the Italian was not well worded, “Per Sua Santita Benedeto XVI: serva la Chiesa nel nascondimento con una vita dedicata alla preghiera e alla meditazione.” I asked a couple Italians. They thought it sounded odd, though we all knew what it meant.

Here is my summation of this first Mass, which we must admit is a unique occasion in a pontificate. What’s the phrase about “first impressions”?

First, I thought the abrupt imposition of a new style was not the best approach.

Understand this: my disagreement is not based merely on the fact that the ceremony or style was simpler, but that it was simpler in this moment and in this place. This was the end of a conclave to elect a Pope, with the College of Cardinals, in the Sistine Chapel. There is a certain decorum that needs to be observed, consonant with the occasion and those present. There are moments when all the Roman tradition must be in full play. There will be times in the parishes in the suburbs of Rome when something else can be done. But this was the moment to go high.

That said, I was struck but a a point in the sermon:

“Chi non prega al Signore, prega al diavolo. If you don’t pray to Christ, you pray to the devil.”

There’s a carefully phased ecumenical statement!

This is the same man who, in the face of unnatural marriage proponents in Argentina said that same-sex marriage discriminates against children.

The man’s got a backbone.

So, it is going to take Francis a while to learn who he is as Roman Pontiff.

He won’t just be able to go around or do exactly as he pleases, even as he desires to shift this or that or change style of emphasis. He has o get used to his surroundings. I don’t blame him on a human level for reverting to personal taste in such a terrifying moment of his life. He is clearly a man who has had authority thrust on him at different stages.

Continue to pray for him as we all make adjustments.

Conclave concludes: Mass in the Sistine Chapel with Cardinals
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120 Responses to Conclave concludes: Mass in the Sistine Chapel with Cardinals

  1. Jon_in_the_Nati says:

    Not awful. Not great, but not awful. I suppose those of us who love traditional liturgy are going to be picking at Pope Francis every time he says mass for a good, long while. I wish it were not so. I doubt Pope Francis will deviate significantly from what Benedict did; and lest we forget, Benedict wore some pretty hideous vestments in his time as well. Who, try as we might, can forget this fresh look: http://badvestments.blogspot.com/2009/08/whoops.html

    And the versus populum altar could have been far worse; it could have been a coffee table. At least there were six candles on it. Did Benedict ever use a versus populum altar in the Sistine Chapel?

  2. Joboww says:

    although somewhat disappointing that he didn’t celebrate ad orientem and the vestments are less pontifical [?] he is the Holy Father and a simple one at that. That is the same cross that Benedict walked with though, so that is a positive.

  3. jbosco88 says:

    I would presume that a relatively old man, with only one lung, could not be expected to sing too much – if at all. Paul VI had a dreadful singing voice (I am too young to know, but so I am told).

    His homily being preached as I type, is impressive.

  4. Geoffrey says:

    I am sad about the altar.

    But before traditionalists begin harping that he doesn’t chant the prayers or didn’t intone the Gloria, His Holiness has one lung. I have mild asthma, and when it flares up, it is nearly impossible to chant or sing or sometimes even talk without getting out of breath.

    Best line in the homily: “When we don’t preach the Lord, we preach the devil”.

  5. CatholicByChoice says:

    “Angel in the Sky” seen in S. Florida on the day the new Pope was chosen. From a local news station, showing photos of the angel in the sky sent in by people living in the area. If you scroll down to the larger picture, you can click on it to see a series of 8 photos.
    http://www.wptv.com/dpp/news/region_c_palm_beach_county/west_palm_beach/a-message-from-above?llll

    May God bless our Pope Francis!

  6. Titus says:

    “Benedict wore some pretty hideous vestments in his time as well. ”

    Thanks to Piero Marini for that one.

    I suppose we say farewell to the fanon, and perhaps to the Vatican sacristy’s mitre collection, once again. Poor Guido.

  7. I too was disappointed when I saw the altar. But, it is well done, not an ironing board. Also, as I think about it, he has probably been saying mass versus populum for decades, no? This having probably been a rough couple of days for him, probably not the best time to try a first go at celebration ad orientem! Not that it’s THAT hard, just that this probably isn’t the best time to start, even if he were so inclined.

  8. Geoffrey says:

    carolina publican:

    Good point!

    You can see his Eucharistic devotion in how he looks at and adores the Host and Chalice… He hold it aloft even after the bells cease. Nice!

  9. Titus says:

    “His Holiness has one lung. I have mild asthma, and when it flares up, it is nearly impossible to chant or sing or sometimes even talk without getting out of breath. ”

    Ahh, that is a distinct possibility: he may not be able to sing.

    As for the organ, isn’t it always there? I could hear it during the Veni Creator Spiritas during the procession into the chapel at the beginning of the conclave.

  10. Patrick-K says:

    I see he has Mons. Marini up there with him, that’s a good sign…

  11. wolfeken says:

    I give Monsignor Marini one month before either he is asked to leave, or decides on his own that this job is no longer suited for him. A pity, as he has been an amazing coordinator of restoring several beautiful things to papal liturgies, until yesterday.

  12. rdschreiner says:

    Not to be nitpicky, but profound bows and no genuflections after the consecration. Very disappointed in no chanting, not even the Mysterium Fidei and Per Ipsum. I think this is going to be a tough pontificate for those of us liturgically minded.

  13. haribo says:

    The new pope has one lung, which is probably why nothing is or will be chanted. That said, it’s a shame Pope Francis chose to reverse Benedict’s custom of saying Mass ad orientem in the Sistine Chapel, and on his first day of being pope. It’s very difficult for any pope to make lasting changes for this reason.

  14. Fr AJ says:

    I too noticed no genuflections. Does his Holiness have arthritic knees I wonder? If not, count me as concerned.

  15. Jon_in_the_Nati says:

    The pope has only one lung, and so is likely unable to chant. As to genuflecting, the guy is 76, after all. I know priests younger than that who have bad legs (etc.) and cannot genuflect. Can we just cut the guy a little slack? Just a little bit?

  16. Maynardus says:

    Re: Marini, it will certainly be interesting to see what happens. It may well be that a (presumably) liturgically-insensitive pope nonetheless has the good sense – divine inspiration? – to leave the liturgical details of his public celebrations in the hands of one so well-suited. He must certainly realize the enormity of his task as Pontiff, the reason(s) for which he was elected, and the the limits of his own mortality…

  17. Imrahil says:

    I have not seen the Mass. But the fact that there is no Tabernacle in the Sistine Chapel reduces to a good deal the number of genuflections to be expected.

  18. Jim of Bowie says:

    Wonderful homily. Like him more the more I listen to him. Hoping I’m wrong, but I think beautiful Papal liturgies are a thing of the past.

  19. The Astronomer says:

    He is our Pope and as Roman Catholics we owe him obedience. He is not renowned as a liturgical scholar like the previous Holy Father Benedict XVI; therefore, a certain segment of the traditionalist community will throw a nutty every now and then. It is difficult, however, to listen to the happiness on the progressive side (Fishwrap, et al) that we’re finally gotten a Pope who is a ‘true ecumenist’ and has ‘a foundational concern for social justice and peace.’

    Even if he is not inclined to promote/encourage the EF Mass, he will likely not rescind anything. This man is a product of Vatican II, FWIW. He is ‘allegedly’ not a fan of Tradition or the EF Mass, but perhaps this is understandable in light of his experience with the large SSPX presence in Argentina. After all, Bp. Alfonso de Galarreta was a professor at the SSPX seminary in La Reja, Argentina for quite a while.

    Let’s all take a deep breath and remember the words of St. Padre Pio “Pray, Hope and Don’t Worry!!!” We all know what we need to do to save our souls…

  20. Christopher says:

    What if we petitioned the Holy Father to celebrate Ad Orientem?

    God Bless.

  21. Captain Peabody says:

    It is only the first day of his pontificate, and the Holy Father looks understandably tired. I expect the versus populum had less to do with an imperious command from His Holiness in hatred of the liturgy than a simple desire to make the Holy Father comfortable and not strain him unnecessarily. Has he ever celebrated Ad Orientem before? There has hardly been time for training and discussion.

    The time in which he begins to really set liturgical precedent for his pontificate is still to come.

    Also, his voice was very weak. I suspect he would have had difficulty chanting.

    God save our Holy Father Pope Francis!

  22. jbosco88 says:

    The mitre the Holy Father wore appears to be a favourite of his – there are many pictures of him wearing it during his time as Cardinal.

    Of note, he had a very lacy cotta on for the conclave. I believe he may leave the liturgy to his MCs, but elevated thrones, heavy vestments, lace, tall mitres, ermine, I believe are all out for a Pope who must of course concern himself with his breathing – he seemed to struggle today at the Pax, slowing down considerably.

  23. God bless Pope Francis.

    I’m going to keep saying this, till it soaks in. The true liturgical reform and renewal, which Pope Benedict sought to bring about, will not work as a “top-down” affair. Our recent holy father chose to set it in motion from the “bottom up” as it were. That’s the best way to do it. While the example of the holy father is important, no doubt, the things that many of us are dedicated to, in the liturgy, can and will proceed. We already have a growing number of priests dedicated to this renewal. In years ahead, more bishops. Before long, cardinals.

    This, I think, was Pope Benedict’s genius. This sort of renewal is harder to stop, and will have better fruit. And, if you think about it, the problematic things that happened in the liturgy also happened this way.

    These comments, by the way, are not a commentary on Pope Francis’s liturgical approach. Too little data. They are a response to those who fret that a Pope Francis who isn’t pursuing the same liturgical vision will stymie what many of us look for.

    God bless Pope Francis.

  24. Frank H says:

    Concerning the free standing altar, I think that the temporary floor that was installed for the conclave is still there (I doubt they had time to tear it out overnight) and that table altar was used for the casting of ballots. I’ll wager the temporary stuff is gone within a week, including the table altar.

  25. Anchorite says:

    How interesting. Watching this Mass I caught myself thinking that prior to Pope Benedict we all would have thought that it looked strikingly traditional for Novus Ordo, yet after eight hard-fought years of that pontificate, the tradition was restored far enough for Pope Francis’s first Mass to appear as a throwback to the bland and mediocre days of “Vatican II” nonsense.
    While I don’t share the doomsayers’ attitude and mood, and don’t feel we have the right to judge the new pope who is just completing the real first day in the office, I am not blind and will not look for excuses and explanations. Pope Francis’s actions in the past 24 hours speak for themselves. And they stand in considerable contrast to the actions of the previous Holy Father. And that’s intentional.

  26. Legisperitus says:

    Fr. Fox: You are right! Just think of all the young “Benedictine” (so to speak) priests who are just starting out, inspired by his example.

  27. MarcAnthony says:

    In my humble opinion, we may be forgetting that there are a great many important things other than the liturgy (I am NOT saying that the liturgy isn’t very, very important).

    Pope Francis’s style for saying mass doesn’t necessarily always mean he’s making some sort of statement about more traditional masses. There are a lot of things that going simple represents besides a comment on the liturgy.

    That said, this was probably the occasion for a very traditional liturgy, although I’m not going to bring the house down screaming and stamping my feet and make this a much bigger deal than it really is.

  28. M. K. says:

    I’m very curious what Benedict XVI’s Mass at the conclusion of the 2005 conclave looked like by comparison; I’ve been looking around online, and all I can find so far are videos from the public Mass in St. Peter’s Square but nothing from within the Sistine Chapel. It would be interesting to compare and contrast – especially since the 2005 Mass would presumably have been planned by Piero Marini and not Guido Marini. Does anyone have any leads on this?

  29. anna 6 says:

    His voice does seem very delicate, so I imagine that we won’t be hearing much singing. But on the other hand, he might just be just getting his bearings.

    It is interesting that he has only referred to himself as a “bishop”. I wonder if he is making a statement or if is simply going to take some time before it sinks in?

    At first, Benedict XVI pulled his hand away when people went to kiss his ring. I read somewhere that he even said to some friends, “can’t we just be normal”? But eventually, he submitted, because it wasn’t about HIM.

    Pray for our new sweet Holy Father. He must be in such turmoil right now!

  30. APX says:

    I was amused to hear in the 1st reading from Isaiah, “the stone that was rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone”. Ironic, in that it is said that he was a strong second at the beginning of the 2005 conclave.

    I was watching on EWTN that they mentioned he also tried to reform the Jesuits, but they rejected him and exiled him to the furthermost corner of Argentina. Boy, I sure wouldn’t want to be them now…

    It is difficult, however, to listen to the happiness on the progressive side (Fishwrap, et al) that we’re finally gotten a Pope who is a ‘true ecumenist’ and has ‘a foundational concern for social justice and peace.’

    Meh, give it time. He’s still solid on moral issues that the aforementioned want changed. Once they realize that, they won’t be as happy. ETWN also mentioned after his first Mass that he spoke of the need to “roll the clock back”. If I recall correctly, this is exactly the same accusations they held against Benedict XVI. I’m sure they’ll sober up over time.

  31. charismatictrad says:

    Umm…did ANYONE read Fr. Z’s post just before this? I don’t think he’s against the Tridentine. I tend to agree with Fr. Fox, as well. Let’s not be like liberals and judge based on little to no correct information.

  32. Darren says:

    Thank you Fr. Fox for your insight, which makes a lot of sense. I know there was a good number of younger diocesan priests present when Bishop O’Connell celebrated the Pontifical High Mass in Trenton back in November. It will take time to work its way up, but it will work its way up.

    Having one lung can make a lot of things difficult, but hasn’t he had one lung most of his life? Once all this settles in he will become more comfortable. Let us pray for him, for health of body and mind.

  33. M. K. says:

    anna 6 said: “At first, Benedict XVI pulled his hand away when people went to kiss his ring. I read somewhere that he even said to some friends, ‘can’t we just be normal’? But eventually, he submitted, because it wasn’t about HIM.”

    Amen to that. Just as Pope Benedict XVI was told he had to wear white all the time even if he might have preferred otherwise, perhaps Msgr. Marini could graciously say to Pope Francis, “Your Holiness, it may be hard for you to get used to wearing these vestments, and I know you would never have chosen them for yourself – but it’s not about you, it’s about the office you hold, and this is what the pope wears.”

  34. acricketchirps says:

    Hmmm, maybe he’s waiting to see if he outlasts JPI before celebrating ad orientem.

  35. TNCath says:

    I too was disappointed to see the Mass not celebrated ad orientem. I predict a lot less chanting by our new Pope and the end of the use of the Roman vestments.

    Msgr. Marini seemed visibly annoyed on the balcony when the Holy Father didn’t wear the mozzetta when he was presented to the people in St. Peter’s Square. Fr. Lombardi confirmed that Msgr. Marini was “put off” by it. I also fear that Msgr. Marini’s future as Master of Ceremonies is going to be up for review.

    Please do not misunderstand: I believe our new Holy Father will be a wonderful Pope. However, I also hope that he will realize that with his personal preferences in the name of simplicity come also the carrying on of the hermeneutic of continuity, carrying on where Popes Benedict and John Paul II left off. Viva il Papa!

  36. acardnal says:

    I think this is an interesting quote from Pope Francis’ homily today that might portend something of his intentions as Pope. But it is still vague.

    “Walking, building-constructing, professing: the thing, however, is not so easy, because in walking, in building, in professing, there are sometimes shake-ups – there are movements that are not part of the path: there are movements that pull us back.”

    http://www.news.va/en/news/pope-francis-1st-homily-full-text

  37. Stumbler but trying says:

    @TNCath
    “Msgr. Marini seemed visibly annoyed on the balcony when the Holy Father didn’t wear the mozzetta when he was presented to the people in St. Peter’s Square. Fr. Lombardi confirmed that Msgr. Marini was “put off” by it. ”
    Your source for such?
    Our Holy Father may not w
    ear the papal attire we have become accustomed to with our beloved Papa Emeritus, Benedict, but I say we pray, let him get his bearings and pray that Msgr. Marini be his gentle guide for a long time to come. It did occur to me that like St. Francis, perhaps, we can smile at the thought and give praise to God, he wears Christ on his heart in truth, and in love, and in faith.
    He wears the mantle of Mary our Mother too and we, as we embark on this new journey with Papa Francesco, will come to see these gifts unfold before the whole of humanity.

    In time too, he will realize and embrace the fact that he is special and will therefore not be able to jump in the car, at the drop of a hat, and run off to wherever he fancies. He is too important and must be protected as all Holy Fathers before him. I hope he will remember what Papa Benedict said before he retired, “your life is not your own anymore but belongs to the whole Church.” To embrace such a truth well, that takes humility too and submission before the Lord.

    Onward then! Let us take up his invitation to journey together for the greater glory of God!

  38. capchoirgirl says:

    Vis a vis the one-lung thing, Darren: OK, I didn’t have one lung, but I had CF which gave me about 23% lung function before my lung transplant. I did pretty well most of the time; I’m even a classically trained singer, and I sing a LOT. But if you’re nervous breathing can be hard! :) So while I’m sure he’s adjusted and compensated for the one lung, there are probably still times when it’s a bit of a detriment in speaking/singing/chanting/etc.

  39. Jon says:

    If you want to indulge in a little more Lenten self-flagellation, go read this:

    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/messages/pont-messages/2005/documents/hf_ben-xvi_mes_20050420_missa-pro-ecclesia_en.html

    Spare yourself looking for the pictures, your heart will break.

    FWIW, the mitre Francis wore today is an old one. There are many pictures of him wearing it back in Argentina. I’m guessing it has sentimental value.

  40. Eriugena says:

    There is a great Carmelite Saint, St Teresa Margaret of the Sacred Heart, and I recommend devotion to her to all the Priests I know, but it’s almost impossible to find santini for her. She was a great one for nascondimento, the concealment we must live as part of our imitation of Christ who lived so many years unseen.
    The trouble with this term is that it is used a lot by that arch-heretic, Mr. (not Fr.) Enzo Bianchi, “Prior” at a place called Bose which some of your readers may have heard of, but in a completely different sense.
    So the prayer “serva la Chiesa nel nascondimento con una vita dedicata alla preghiera e alla meditazione” is more a sort of “For His Holiness Benedict XVI: may he continue to serve the Church with a life dedicated to prayer and meditation even now that we cannot see him.”

  41. SonofMonica says:

    Just wanted to point out that laity et al were given communion on the kneelers at the Mass today, a la Pope Benedict’s wishes.

  42. Denis Crnkovic says:

    If this hasn’t been noted before, we do have to remember that Pope Francis is the first pope whose first Mass was NOT celebrated according to the older rites, he having been ordained in the transitional litrugical year of 1969. I doubt he had any formal training in saying the EF Mass. His first Mass would have been that strange hybrid of 1962 Missal plus vernacular stuff ‘n things and certainly some kind of musical innovation. Someone may correct me in this if the Argentine was behind in liturgical change in the late 1960s. Certainly the hispanic Catholic communities in the U.S. had adopted the guitar and tambourine and vernacular “salsa” style music at Mass by then.

  43. Amerikaner says:

    It amazes me to no end that it has been a day and blog comments on various sites have so much negativity towards the new Holy Father regarding liturgy, etc. Terribly shameful and sad. One should give serious pause and withhold critical comments.

  44. kallman says:

    let us wait and see but I would understand if Mgr Marini is worried

  45. Kathleen10 says:

    All very interesting. Food for thought. Catholicbychoice thank you for the photo of the angel in the sky! Lovely!
    It seems like we’re in for a bit of a wild ride until things get straightened out a bit, doesn’t it.
    I couldn’t help but notice his breathing as he stood on the loggia. Who wouldn’t be nervous. He was breathing hard. I’m a therapist. I notice those things.

  46. Kathleen10 says:

    I should mention too that his gentle voice may reflect his one lung more than his personality. We’ll find out soon enough.

  47. Well, Jon, not quite. What you linked is merely an English translation of Pope Benedict XVI’s initial papal homily on April 20 in the Sistine Chapel. The actual homily, which he delivered in Latin–and reportedly composed in Latin by himself overnight– is here:

    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/messages/pont-messages/2005/documents/hf_ben-xvi_mes_20050420_missa-pro-ecclesia_lt.html

    Yes, read it in the original, and weep for the memory so recent, of a pope such as we surely will never see again. (At least, not those of us of a certain age.)

  48. tech_pilgrim says:

    I like that he kept the Benedictine arrangement of the altar, with 6 candles and a crucifix.

  49. jbosco88 says:

    I read somewhere that he can celebrate the Divine Liturgy of St John Chrysostom?

  50. Ignatius says:

    Let me add something from Buenos Aires: Pope Francis, as Cardinal Bergoglio is accustomed to celebrate the “standard” OF that you will see in the Archdiocese -and in most of Argentina-. No chanted parts whatsoever, versus populum and no Latin. Normally, there are “altar girls” and EMHCs, even if not really necessary to have them. I am extremely surprised that he wore an amice for this Mass (I have never seen him wearing one). We are really very, but very deep in the 70’s in our liturgy here and he has shown, as Archbishop, an intense dislike for Latin, ad orientem and chant. Liturgical vestments are usually made of polyester and with the usual patterns form 40 years ago.

    I believe that he -like most Argentine clergy I know- sees all these things as “effete”, some sort of vanity unworthy of our efforts, that should be focused on preaching the Gospel and feeding the poor or accretions that distract from the main thing, the Real Presence of Christ (which is something never put in doubt here).

    I wonder if he will grow from this vision. I think that if those liturgically inclined want to change his view on this issue, they should show him that the Church can be poor AND have good liturgy, that this does not detract but is the very fountain of evangelization and service to the poor. But if he tends to see them as vain people, more preocuppied with silk birettas and sashes, the quality of the wool of their cassocks and the golden cufflinks of their shirts than with the Gospel, we are doomed.

    Rgds.

  51. Theodorus says:

    I’m no longer concerned about how Pope Francis celebrates the mass or what vestments he uses, because like it or not, he is the Pope now, but I have to say, I feel so so so sorry for Msgr. Marini.

  52. RobertK says:

    “Theodorus says:
    I feel so so so sorry for Msgr. Marini.”

    Same here:(. He looks lost without Benedict XVI.

  53. RobertK says:

    I also feel sorry for the Sistine Chapel Choir. They will probably be replaced by the Choir of the LA Religious Education Congress. Just joking!!!:) We need to be optimistic.

  54. boxerpaws1952 says:

    “I wonder if he will grow from this vision. I think that if those liturgically inclined want to change his view on this issue, they should show him that the Church can be poor AND have good liturgy, that this does not detract but is the very fountain of evangelization and service to the poor. ”
    agree and this is not a detraction of our new Holy Father. I sense some of us are a little uneasy yet. I miss His Holiness Benedict the XVI much. We must offer our new Pontiff prayers and support too.I heard he did not want to be Pope.Not sure if that’s true.If it is perhaps it took some persuasion.He may need time-we may need time.This is what now? Day 2.

  55. catholicmidwest says:

    The first homily, preached to the Cardinals in the Sistine Chapel, full text:
    http://www.news.va/en/news/pope-francis-1st-homily-full-text

  56. tgarcia2 says:

    So we are on about him not genuflecting? The rubrics allow a profound bow if you’re not able to (just like they allow the congregation to stand if there is not enough space to kneel for consecration and bow when the priest genuflects/bows)….and all this talk about how the Mass was not with the high pomp…the Mass is more than just what he’s wearing or not wearing (it’s not a fashon show) and I would not want to even think of the comments of how Mass is said out in the field of battle…some of you might faint that a canteen was used for the blood of Christ.

  57. Darren says:

    apchoirgirl says:
    … But if you’re nervous breathing can be hard! :) So while I’m sure he’s adjusted and compensated for the one lung, there are probably still times when it’s a bit of a detriment in speaking/singing/chanting/etc.

    I am sure he has his share of nerves right now :)

  58. boxerpaws1952 says:

    “However, I also hope that he will realize that with his personal preferences in the name of simplicity come also the carrying on of the hermeneutic of continuity” True.
    i’ve been reading different articles about our new Holy Father and trying to get a sense of continuity w/o being critical. What i’ve read so far makes me think he is trying to make as much a break with the Pontificate of Benedict the XVI as possible. Could be wrong but that’s what i’m getting a sense of so far. Yes,read that Msgr Marini was put off from several sources so there must be some truth to it. I don’t want to heap anymore criticism on our new Holy Father than he’s already had-this is afterall only day 2-but i would think given a choice in a matter like this of wanting to be simple or not offending another person-the not offending the other person might have been the more charitable. It concerns me much that-although he’s free to do so-he’s trying too hard to show everyone that he is not His Holiness Benedict the XVI.Not sure why. Maybe i’m reading that wrong too. Don’t mis uderstand.He has many wonderful qualities. He took some truly courageous steps in his own country that we can’t take away from him. We certainly don’t want to become divided. No need to. I grew up with the Trinidene Mass. Later the Norvus Ordo. The Mass is not entertainment for an hour. His Holiness Benedict the XVI was bringing back the reverence that we used to have. (been on both sides). Anyway,this IS only day 2 and he is our new Pope. :) We’ve had quite a month haven’t we?

  59. Juergensen says:

    Is anyone here happy?

  60. deliberatejoy says:

    I am. :)

  61. OrthodoxChick says:

    I’ve held off posting my thoughts about our new Holy Father because it has taken me a while to get over the surprise of his election and gather them together. The best I can come up with for now is probably a feeble analogy.

    I liken this to an arranged marriage. Perhaps this person is not the exact spouse whom I would have chosen for myself had I been given the opportunity. Nevertheless, he was chosen for me by people who were exercising their care and concern for my well-being and they chose the person whom they felt to be the best for me, with the qualities they felt I need. I may see things differently right now, at the very beginning, but in time, I may feel differently. Maybe not. Either way, the choice has been made for me and now I am in a sacred relationship, for better and worse, til death do us part. Now it is time for me to learn to love him. I already love him in terms of Christian charity, as we ought. But in order to love him in terms of a relationship, first, I need to get to know him. That means observing him, listening to him, and just becoming more familiar with him. Then, just like my actual spouse, over time, I will identify things that really endear him to me, qualities that I really admire, and yes, probably a few qualities that fray my nerves (to say the least, in the case of my real spouse – and vice versa, I’m sure). Yet, just as with my real spouse, there will be those times when I must make the conscious choice and the effort to love him and give him my best, even when we don’t see eye-to-eye, even when it’s the last thing that I feel like doing.

    Love is a choice, not a feeling. Surely, as faithful Catholics, we are capable of deciding to love this humble man, the Vicar of Christ.

  62. jmgarciajr says:

    I’m happy.

    And, as I mentioned in a previous combox, I want to draw everyone’s attention to one fact: While B16’s homily was composed by him in Latin and read, Francis extemporized a beautiful homily in a language not his first.

    I am not expecting Francis to be the liturgical beacon Benedict was, but I am still, overall, pleased.

  63. deliberatejoy says:

    I’m happy because though I’m well aware that I don’t have a clue, any more than any of the rest of the world, God does – and God chose this man, and has more than enough oomph to accommodate for his strengths and weaknesses in both the short and long run. That’s the way it is, has been and will be, world-without-end-amen, and he is Peter, and he is the Rock, and the gates of Hell shall not prevail, and that is all there is to be said about THAT.

  64. boxerpaws1952 says:

    “my disagreement is not based merely on the fact that the ceremony or style was simpler, but that it was simpler in this moment and in this place. This was the end of a conclave to elect a Pope, with the College of Cardinals, in the Sistine Chapel. There is a certain decorum that needs to be observed, consonant with the occasion and those present. There are moments when all the Roman tradition must be in full play. There will be times in the parishes in the suburbs of Rome when something else can be done. But this was the moment to go high. ” Yes and that was very disconcerting.

  65. Blaise says:

    I got the distinct impression listening to his Holiness on the balcony yesterday that he is not very comfortable with Latin. I mean in terms of how competent and familiar he is in the language not his views on it. In that regard he is probably in the majority of bishops today and Pope Benedict XVI was a rarity.

  66. MBeauregard says:

    I believe the chasuble worn today was chosen by Msgr. Marini, no? The pontifical vestments are usually chosen in advance and laid out for the pontiff…..I doubt Pope Francis strolled through the sacristy until he found something he liked. However, I do believe Marini chose something different than he originally planned. He knows not to rock the boat too hard, not yet. And remember, the pallium will not be seen until Tuesday. With that being said, take a look at the following photos of Pope Benedict’s first Mass at the link below. Notice that there are two candles on the altar balanced by a spray of flowers on the opposite side. Notice too that the pontifical chair is no where to be seen and that the altar of sacrifice is not even raised upon a platform. Compared to eight years ago, this Mass does not appear to be too bad – especially with the added bonus of a much improved choir and musical settings.
    http://saintbedestudio.blogspot.com/2013/02/benedict-xvi-5.html

  67. MBeauregard says:

    One more point: Pope Francis was wearing his pectoral cross beneath the chasuble (as it really should be) and made use of the amice today. Therefore, I believe Msgr. Marini is guiding him and Pope Francis is accepting his advice.

  68. Giuseppe says:

    In an NO Mass in Latin, how much chant is expected? In most NO Masses, there is no chant.

    Added observations:
    1) Msgr. Marini will try to play Henry Higgins for a while, but he will be gone in a month. I must say, his voice grates on my nerves, but I do admire his sense of reverence.
    2) I’d hold off using boy soprano soloists until about 10 years after the pedophilia scandal blows over. (The psalm was pretty painful.)
    3) Pope Francis is in complete awe and adoration of the Eucharist. This man truly loves Jesus.
    4) Pope Francis reminds me of a combination of JP II + John XXIII with a little JP I thrown in. And from a distance he looks like Yogi Berra.

  69. Pingback: Liturgical Doomsday! » The Curt Jester

  70. Giuseppe says:

    Who were the 2 concelebrants of this Mass? Re and Bertone? I must admit that I cannot keep track of who is who anymore.

  71. Giuseppe says:

    I knew this was a NO mass when everyone in the audience was in “orans” pose during the Pater Noster. Oh wait, they were all cardinals…

    I am completely in love with vatican.va. I have been at work all day, so coming home to watch these videos is a major blessing.

  72. Jason Keener says:

    I don’t think it is true that God or the Holy Spirit picks or chooses the Pope. The Cardinals, with their free will, choose the Pope. The Cardinals might or might not choose the man the Holy Spirit wants or the man best suited to the job. Hopefully, the Cardinals always try to prayerfully discern what the Holy Spirit is asking for when electing a Pope and get it right, but we have no guarantee of this. We must be careful about saying that God chooses this or that Pope because there were several bad and immoral Popes in the history of the Church like Alexander VI. We can probably say that the Holy Spirit did not choose someone like Alexander VI to ascend to the Chair of Peter, although it would be true to say that God permitted it for some reason. Also, though I don’t think the Holy Spirit picks the Pope, we do have a guarantee that the Holy Spirit will prevent the Church from defecting and prevent Popes from teaching error in matters of faith and morals. That’s just my two cents. :-)

  73. kurtmasur says:

    As many have already commented on here before, Pope Francis has only one lung and it is very likely the reason why he doesn’t chant any of the liturgy. On the other hand, I’ve also noticed that his speech is rather slowly paced (which I actually like, btw)…. Could this also be as a result of having one lung?

  74. MarcAnthony says:

    “I don’t think it is true that God or the Holy Spirit picks or chooses the Pope. The Cardinals, with their free will, choose the Pope.”

    Correct. The faith comes in when we consider the thousands of prayers for the rightful selection of the new Pope. I have faith that God has answered our prayers.

  75. MAJ Tony says:

    Were I the chief of the Papal liturgical wardrobe, I would have embroidered, in red, in the lingua ecclesia, within the interior of the exterior garments a Biblical quote, or two, reminding the wearer that it is not he that wears this garment, but Him in whose place he stands, and thus, it is Christ in whose glory he is clothed. I would then make it a point to point this out to the Holy Father. This, akin to the Pater sancte, sic transit gloria mundi would at once, remind the Pope that he is the Peter in John 21 (…thou wilt stretch out thy hands, and another shall gird thee, and carry thee where thou goest, not of thy own will.), and give a very humble Pope such as ours a point to ponder as to why he would wear such splended garments in liturgy. Perhaps it is fitting that he wear simple clothing as house dress, of course, at least beyond the temporal bounds of his Vatican City territory. It is not 350 A.D. The Pope doesn’t need a fancy garment to appeal to other temporal leaders.

  76. boxerpaws1952 says:

    “1) Msgr. Marini will try to play Henry Higgins for a while, but he will be gone in a month. I must say, his voice grates on my nerves, but I do admire his sense of reverence.” then this is the very person Pope Francis should keep on.
    2) I’d hold off using boy soprano soloists until about 10 years after the pedophilia scandal blows over. ”
    why? what possible difference could it make?
    we’re not whining like the liberals would do nor going into schism like SPPX. These are honest and thoughtful observations. We have lost 2 popes so far. One to death(we had closure)and one that was totally unexpected but not surprising. We’re just a little concerned. We’re not tearing down our new Holy Father .We will be respectful and give him time to get adjust to his new role.As we adjust to his new role too-but w are also free to speak re legitimate concerns we may have. I’m not ready to treat the Pope Emeritus like dust under a rug. I’m also not ready to treat Pope Francis with any less respect than i did John Paul II or Benedict the XVI. We can love him with a sincere Christian love but we can be honest and objective too. Sigh. Maybe we need to step back for a few days and catch our breathe? I hope i didn’t come across as not liking Pope Francis. Far from it!

  77. MarcAnthony says:

    Juergensen:

    “Is anyone here happy?”

    Very! Viva la Papa!

  78. acardnal says:

    MBeauregard, regarding your post above, there was a different “Marini” as MC at Pope Benedict’s first Mass. That explains the altar setting for one thing! The two Marini’s are quite different in style liturgically.

  79. Denis says:

    Alas, the responsorial psalm is back.

  80. oledocfarmer says:

    Prior to his election, he appears invariably to have incorrectly worn his pectoral cross over the chasuble as some sort of quasi-vestment necklace. That’s invariably a bad sign….what’s the agenda? Who knows, but it demonstrates a lack of knowledge of vesture.

    He didn’t do that today. Score one for Msgr. Marini!

  81. Lucas says:

    We’ll learn a lot about his liturgical style and how much he leans on Msgr Marini when hes installation mass rolls around.

    That said, I’m ok with the choice. I think he’ll do good work behind the scenes, but he won’t rock the boat to much liturgically.

  82. MisterH says:

    The folks at CatholicVote have put together a wonderful, short video commemorating the election of Pope Francis.

    You can view the video at the link:

    http://allhands-ondeck.blogspot.com/2013/03/video-celebrating-election-of-pope.html

  83. Geoffrey says:

    “Alas, the responsorial psalm is back.”

    As is to be expected, since today’s Mass was from either the “Ordo Rituum Conclavis” or the “Ordo Rituum pro Ministerii Petrini Initio Romæ Episcopi”.

  84. mamajen says:

    Wasn’t sure where to put this, but thought this was an interesting read:

    http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2013/03/14/drive_bys_shocked_to_learn_pope_francis_is_catholic

  85. John Nolan says:

    I think he does have problems genuflecting. It was more than a bow – both hands were on the altar. And anyone joining the Js in 1958 will have been well grounded in Latin. The quiet reverence of the Eucharistic Prayer was very much in the Benedict style.

  86. americangirl says:

    He is the Pope for this time in History. I believe chosen by the Holy Spirit! Lest we forget these words: “For my thoughts are not your thoughts: nor your ways my ways,” saith the Lord. I think we need a little bit less complaining and A lot more trust in the Lord. IT IS HE WHO IS IN CONTROL! Does he not tell us:”And we know that to them that love God, all things work together unto good, to such as, according to his purpose, are called to be saints. ” Let us Trust in His Holy Will.

  87. capchoirgirl says:

    Slow speaking: yup, I bet the one lung has something to do with it. You only have limited oxygen so you speak slowly and then pause when you need to, in order to get more air.
    Interestingly enough, one lung is actually larger than the other, so depending on what lung was taken, that can also play a role. When your lungs are compromised every bit of function is crucial!
    And yes, I am happy with him.

  88. Katylamb says:

    In answer to the question above: I am happy. I felt sad and lost when we didn’t have a pope, and along with others I prayed to God to give us a pope and now we have Pope Francis. I read here though that God did not give us Pope Francis- the cardinals did. Okay, I’m not one of the super intelligent people on earth, but I do have faith that God answered our prayers. I do believe that God gave us the pope we are supposed to have at this time. Therefore, I am happy and I thank God for Pope Francis. I love him already. I hope he does all the things everyone here wants, and dresses the way everyone here says he should, and so on. But if he doesn’t I guess we’ll just have to accept him as he is.

  89. jbosco88 says:

    To quote a Priest I know:

    “Everyone. Keep calm and pray. We are obedient Catholics. It’s what we do. Atheists lose hope. We persue the comfort of truth.”

  90. Father G says:

    @jbosco88,

    Yes, His Holiness has celebrated the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom: http://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/catholics/ugcc/51592/

  91. His Grace Bishop John of Caracas informs us that each Russian Christmas, His Holiness was frequently in attendance, and has many kind observations about the Pope.

  92. Venerator Sti Lot says:

    Fr, Z observes, “There’s a carefully phased ecumenical statement!”

    ‘When one does not profess Jesus Christ – I recall the phrase of Leon Bloy – “Whoever does not pray to God, prays to the devil.” When one does not profess Jesus Christ, one professes the worldliness of the devil. […]

    ‘This Gospel continues with a special situation. The same Peter who confessed Jesus Christ, says, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God. I will follow you, but let us not speak of the Cross. This has nothing to do with it.” He says, “I’ll follow you on other ways, that do not include the Cross.” When we walk without the Cross, when we build without the Cross, and when we profess Christ without the Cross, we are not disciples of the Lord. We are worldly, we are bishops, priests, cardinals, Popes, but not disciples of the Lord.

    ‘I would like that all of us, after these days of grace, might have the courage – the courage – to walk in the presence of the Lord, with the Cross of the Lord: to build the Church on the Blood of the Lord, which is shed on the Cross, and to profess the one glory, Christ Crucified. In this way, the Church will go forward.’

    Leon Bloy! (of whom I am always meaning to read more… what are the exact details of the reference?)

    “Signore” (here officially translated “God”) by itself – without the “special situation”- can be thoroughly “ecumenical” with reference to Judaism.

    Pope Francis’s explication of the “special situation” strikes me as “ecumenical” in a more specific way: I am reminded of theses 21 and 24 of Luther’s (Latin) theses in response to his vicar general, Staupitz’s, April 1518 request, which include “without a theology of the cross, man misuses the best things in the worst way” (and, in that context, of theses 92-95 of 1517).

    ‘I would like that all of us […] might have the courage – the courage – to walk in the presence of the Lord, with the Cross of the Lord: to build the Church on the Blood of the Lord, which is shed on the Cross, and to profess l’unica gloria: Cristo Crocifisso [“the one glory, Christ Crucified”]’ – another very finely and carefully phased ecumenical statement (and tender yet inescapably clear ‘Abrahamic’ demarcation)!

  93. Pearl says:

    FoxNews online:

    “Francis and all the cardinals in attendance wore light yellow robes over their cassocks…”

    For reals???

  94. Pearl says:

    LOL! The secular world will never get it, will they?? That was the funniest thing I have encountered since the announcer on the radio yesterday said “Habius POPum – we have a Pope!” LOL!

  95. Joe in Canada says:

    I’m happy.
    And I am grateful that he didn’t knock over a candle and set something on fire, being a Jesuit and all.

  96. MarcAnthony says:

    The liturgy is very, very important, of course. But is it really so bad, as long as he is orthodox and does not undo any of Pope emeritus Benedict’s reforms, if something besides the liturgy is emphasized?

    There are a lot of very important issues in the Church today. The liturgy is one of them, but not the only one. I don’t think it’s necessarily a bad thing if Pope Francis focuses on an issue besides the liturgy as the main point of his papacy. People are acting like it’s the end of the world-sometimes literally.

  97. Michael J. says:

    For me, I am still trying to learn about our new Sovereign Pontiff, Pope Francis. I would like to know how, within minutes of realizing who was elected, that E.W.T.N. T.V. News knew that he received the second most amount of votes in the last Conclave. Isn’t that all a secret? Also, I want to wait and see what, if anything, he does in regard to Summorum Pontificum and the Traditional Latin Mass Movement within the Canonical Structure of the Church. If the election results are in fact not secret, I would like to know who received how many votes and who came in second in the voting to Pope Francis. Also, I agree, there are certain Ceremonies and Protocal for different events that the Holy Father participates in, and it really should not matter what his personal preference is or not. And if one wants to talk about changes in the Church, I know of no other Pope who changed more, and this does NOT include the changes to the Liturgy, than Pope Paul VI. I will not list them all here, as there are so many, but I will mention only a few:elimination of both the Palatine and Noble Guards, elimination of the Galero, elimination of First Tonsure and the Minor Orders (as they once were, I am aware of Instituted Lectors and Instituted Acolytes), and making the Maniple optional. In addition, he placed aside the Papal Tiara, never again, to my knowledge, worn in public by any Pope since he put it aside, I believe during Vatican II. Instead of criticizing what I do not know, I will instead pray for the Sovereign Pontiff, Pope Francis. Also, in fairness, I am not judging Pope Paul VI, just pointing out changes that he instituted.

  98. Gaetano says:

    Read the homily. It pulls no punches. The line about not becoming a failed NGO speaks volumes to the peace & justice crowd. Start preaching Jesus, or you’re praying to the devil. How do you think the Nuns on the Bus should handle that one?

  99. MarcAnthony says:

    Yeah, after reading the homily, the guy seems like a real hard-liner on morals. I think people are going to be surprised on his stance on moral issues.

  100. Father G says:

    It should be remembered that Pope-emeritus Benedict did not celebrate Mass ad orientem in the Sistine chapel on his first full day as Pope either. It wasn’t until January 2008 that he began to do so.

  101. lana says:

    A Jesuit in South America who did not cave to the Liberation Theologists, who prays 15 decades of the Rosary every day, and who preaches Christ Crucified. We are soooooooooo blessed!!!!!! Thanks be to God!!!!!!

  102. acardnal says:

    <b.MarcAnthony wrote, "There are a lot of very important issues in the Church today. The liturgy is one of them, but not the only one."

    It is THE most important issue. Our blog host has all kinds of coffee mugs, T-shirts, bumper stickers, etc. that say . . .

    “Save the Liturgy, Save the World.”

    And it’s true! Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi.

  103. Joan A. says:

    First language! Why surely it is indeed Italian? Pope Francis is of Italian parentage. I can’t find any confirmation online, but wouldn’t you imagine, like most parents with a baby in a foreign country, his would speak Italian at home and he would easily learn Spanish too from his surroundings? And the 2 languages are similar. No worries about his Italian, what he needs to brush up on just a little bit is Latin. (St. Francis of Assisi is also Italian, interesting to note.) We did, in a sense, get an Italian pope.

  104. Joan A. says:

    Our Holy Father does not have “ONLY” one lung. He has one complete lung and one partial lung, both functional.

  105. MarcAnthony says:

    THE most important? I disagree. There are other issues that are certainly at least AS important. Serving the poor, life issues, promoting the theology of the body that Blessed Pope John Paul II always preached on…

    The liturgy needs to be saved. But we’re acting as if not making it *first priority* is equivalent to a) Rolling back the reforms, or b) Forgetting about it completely, or c) Being a bad Pope. None of which are true.

    At any rate, this is my opinion of course. Naturally on Fr. Z’s blog most people will agree with you-and it’s an extremely valid opinion to hold! Don’t get me wrong. But I’m not going to, as Fr. Z likes to say, “have a nutty” because the Pope has decided to emphasize, say, evangelizing and reaching out to the poor as opposed to restoring the traditional Latin mass.

    This, of course, with the presumption that he will still be ACTIVELY (key word!) promoting Pope emeritus Benedict’s reforms, and by actively I mean that he will do his best to watch and make sure they’re implemented. Preferably. But then, I, like the rest of you, don’t really know an awful lot about what REALLY is going on over there, do I?

  106. The Sicilian Woman says:

    ^What Lana said.

    He might be missing a lung, but apparently, he has a backbone, And h is strong doctrinally.

    Pray for him. He needs our prayers, not our pre-judgment.

  107. The Sicilian Woman says:

    ^What Lana said.

    He might be missing a lung, but apparently, he has a backbone. And he is strong doctrinally.

    Pray for him. He needs our prayers, not our pre-judgment.

  108. StWinefride says:

    MarcAnthony: I’d like to add to acardnal’s response. Here are a few passages from Sacrosanctum Concilium, the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, on the importance of the Liturgy:

    2. For the liturgy, “through which the work of our redemption is accomplished,” [1] most of all in the divine sacrifice of the Eucharist, is the outstanding means whereby the faithful may express in their lives, and manifest to others, the mystery of Christ and the real nature of the true Church.

    10….. the liturgy is the summit toward which the activity of the Church is directed; at the same time it is the font from which all her power flows. For the aim and object of apostolic works is that all who are made sons of God by faith and baptism should come together to praise God in the midst of His Church, to take part in the sacrifice, and to eat the Lord’s supper.

    The liturgy in its turn moves the faithful, filled with “the paschal sacraments,” to be “one in holiness” [26]; it prays that “they may hold fast in their lives to what they have grasped by their faith” [27]; the renewal in the Eucharist of the covenant between the Lord and man draws the faithful into the compelling love of Christ and sets them on fire. From the liturgy, therefore, and especially from the Eucharist, as from a font, grace is poured forth upon us; and the sanctification of men in Christ and the glorification of God, to which all other activities of the Church are directed as toward their end, is achieved in the most efficacious possible way.

    The whole document here: http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_const_19631204_sacrosanctum-concilium_en.html

    Also, I link to Father Z’s talk (Save the Liturgy, Save the World) from last year’s UK Latin Mass Society one day Conference.

    http://www.lms.org.uk/news-and-events/news-blog/june-2012#conference-mp3-downloads

  109. vetusta ecclesia says:

    If there is a large SSPX contingent in Argentina perhaps HH should be asking why.

  110. rdschreiner says:

    If any of you want to post or send a supportive message to Monsignor Marini, he does have a Facebook page:

    https://www.facebook.com/MonsenhorGuidoMarini?fref=ts

  111. MarcAnthony says:

    I agree that the liturgy is very, VERY important. Nothing is MORE important than the litrugy. I’ll leave it at that.

  112. Pingback: The Triple Papal Tiara! | Annunciation Blog

  113. Fides_et_Ratio says:

    I like Pope Francis even though I miss Pope Benedict.
    And I hope that Benedict will not just pray and meditate, but also read and write books.
    Now that he does not have to deal with administrative problems, he can devote more time to sharing his immense wisdom with us.

    And good luck Pope Francis!

  114. AdMajoremDeiGloriam says:

    Others have stated elsewhere that HH Benedict XVI’s first Mass in the Sistine Chapel used that same versus populum altar. Let’s give some time.

    As Fr. Z has pointed out, we should not make presumptions. As a Catholic in his 20s, I know many people have seen worse liturgical abuse than I have and dealt with it for a longer time. I understand many people can be frustrated or scared at the thought of losing liturgical reforms. But let’s not forget that the man who brought us that Marshall Plan is giving, according to his conscience, the greatest service he can now offer to the Church: a live of prayer culminating in the Holy Sacrifice. The prayers of Benedict and all the popes and saints are with Pope Francis as he adores the Blessed Sacrament in the Mass.

    After the past few days, I’m glad to see more people online remembering whom we are referencing in our comments. The saint for which our Pope is named and the founder of his Order didn’t have a lot of certainty that each pope would seek the glory of God. Still, they pledged their obedience, love, and service with true faith in the work of the Holy Spirit. They would be horrified to hear some of the things some vocal Catholics have been saying about our new Pope. We are not guaranteed signs from his past that he will take the Church in the right direction. I hope we pray to St. Francis of Assisi and St. Ignatius of Loyola when we are tempted to detract from the man who stands in the place of God.

  115. AdMajoremDeiGloriam says:

    Also, I should add that there are not a few Jesuits or men in discernment eager to aid Pope Francis in his ministry of more fully uniting his religious. (It’s not just a tug of war.) Please pray for the men entering the Society of Jesus in a few months and for the example they’ll receive.

  116. acardnal says:

    I have read a small amount of detraction on this blog but not a lot. Remember, detraction is revealing a truth about someone that would not otherwise be known, e.g. adultery of a coworker. Actions done in public can be freely discussed. Motives and intentions behind those actions are usually speculation unless the person has revealed publicly why he did or did not do something.

  117. AdMajoremDeiGloriam says:

    Thank you for making that distinction regarding detraction. I’m sorry if it seemed I was referring specifically to this blog. I was referring to what I’ve been seeing in general on Catholic blogs. Actually, most commenters here seem to have been much more gracious than elsewhere (or comment moderation has been better). Detraction, then, is probably not the greatest problem in this situation, but I’ve seen a lot of speculation presented as fact, and even some unfounded revilement of the Pope’s character. In a way, I think I’m doing more venting here than criticizing this blog’s commenters, because I think it hurts all of us to see Catholics insult our Holy Father’s virtue or claim, as some have elsewhere, that he will undermine the papacy.

  118. AnnAsher says:

    Why would it have been a long time since he said the Novus Ordo creed?
    It adds up to me – his close relationship with the East and viewing Himself more as Bishop of Rome.

  119. Father G says:

    @M.K.

    Here are photos of Benedict XVI’s first Mass as Pope in the Sistine Chapel after the 2005 conclave: http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/photogallery/2005/index_20050420.html