ACTION ITEM! POLL ALERT! Wymyn to be ordained or not?

There is another silly wymyn thing taking place in Kalamazoo -zoo-zoo-zoo-zoo! HERE

The local bishop, Most Rev. Paul Bradley, wrote clearly to the diocese as to the consequences of participating in a simulation of a woman’s ordination. His full statement HERE.

The local press as a POLL! Perhaps you can help?

Click HERE and share your thoughts.

I believe and think what the Catholic Church believes and thinks. Women can never be ordained and those who fake such a thing must be excommunicated.

The results as I write:

UPDATE 30 May (12:50 GMT):

Look what happen overnight.

I didn’t remove their cookies from my browsing history, so I couldn’t vote again.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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55 Responses to ACTION ITEM! POLL ALERT! Wymyn to be ordained or not?

  1. I just voted and in place #2 was, “Absolutely not!”

  2. HeatherPA says:

    Voted. Absolutely not. Let’s put that in a major majority.

  3. Massachusetts Catholic says:

    Went and voted. What a stupid newspaper.

  4. mamajen says:

    Strange poll. It seems you can vote more than once, and select multiple options.

    Surprised there’s no mention that she’s also married!

  5. JDBenedictH says:

    My grandparents’ diocese…

    “Absolutely not” was #1 with forty percent of the vote when I voted.

  6. sunbreak says:

    I voted absolutely not. I guess the flakiness comes from eating too many cornflakes (Kalamazoo is home to Kellogg’s).

  7. Elizabeth D says:

    It looks like many Catholics contacted (“harassed and threatened”) the Cogregational church where the fauxdination was to be held and they came to think it was not good for them to host it, so the preposterous event will be at the lady’s house. There were no claims that the “threats” were of violence, property destruction or anything of that nature.

    http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2014/05/harassment_forces_relocation_o.html

    [Alert reporting! Thanks!]

    Fr. Z's Gold Star Award

  8. Michelle F says:

    I also voted “Absolutely not.”

    Also, there is a more recent story at the bottom of the page under “Related Stories.” The Protestant church at which this event was supposed to take place has received so many threatening calls that the fake ordination event has been moved to another location.

  9. Michelle F says:

    I looked through the pictures included with the article to which Fr. Z. linked above, and I see that this woman is wearing a Jewish man’s prayer shawl as a “deacon’s stole.” It is particularly evident in the last photo in the series.

    So, not only is this woman offending the Catholic Church, she’s sticking it to the Jews too!

  10. Nicholas says:

    I wonder if it will be tried at a TLM. Even if it isn’t, I’m sure they will be faithful to V2’s teachings on Gregorian Chant. I mean, they do love V2, right?

  11. Nicholas says:

    Also, someone at their site asked the logical question, “I thought women priests were Protestants.”

    I voted absolutely not.

  12. Uxixu says:

    First impression was absolutely scorn but when I look at her pictures, I feel pity for her, as well as her laicized husband encouraging her in the sacrilegious schism she plans. If she shouldn’t know better, HE should.

    Voted for the leading entry right now, which shows:
    Absolutely not. She deserves to be excommunicated for defying church rules. 52.13% (758 votes)

  13. johnnys says:

    The Catholic vote is coming in…..53 % of the vote says absolutely not.

  14. wmeyer says:

    sunbreak, Kalamazoo is home (or was) to 14 paper mills, some of which made paper boxes for the Kellogg’s and Post’s cereals which call Battler Creek (30 miles east) their home.

    I voted, and am pleased to see that Absolutely not now leads. Kudos to Bp. Bradley, the valiant shepherd of what was my natal diocese.

  15. wmeyer says:

    I had to look it up, but I note with some amusement that Three Oaks is so far to the south and west that it is barely in Michigan. Also, it is much nearer to Notre Shame than to Kalamazoo.

  16. adeacon says:

    I voted “absolutely not.” Lillian Lewis will bring excommunication upon herself, and Catholics in attendance will do the same. Catholics should know, this game Lillian Lewis is playing is deadly. Best that all concerned should stop this nonsense and GO TO CONFESSION, quickly.

  17. Polycarpio says:

    Vote early & vote often!

  18. Polycarpio says:

    Suggest folks vote for the “Churches set their own rules” option, too, so that BOTH choices against the false ordination come out ahead of the choices in favor of it.

  19. scholastica says:

    Polycarpio, I almost selected “Churches set…”, but then realized that no, Jesus set these rules-the others set their own rules and thus separated from the Holy Catholic Church.

    Thus, voted “Absolutely not!” which is now at a strong #1 .The tide has changed likely due to this blog:) Not only this, but the soldiers have their socks!

  20. Panterina says:

    Voted “Absolutely not.” The existing options do not do justice, and it’s too bad that they don’t allow comments. It’s not that it’s the Church that gets to define its rules in this matter: Because the Sacrament of Ordination was instituted by Jesus Christ, the Church as no power to change that which Christ Himself has defined (cf. Ordinatio sacerdotalis).

  21. Iacobus M says:

    “Absolutely Not” still leads. Fr. Z, you would have made a great ward heeler!

  22. Jack in NH says:

    We fixed it, Father.
    NYET!

  23. lsclerkin says:

    If I respond with my true feelings and words, I ‘ll have to go to confession again in the morning.

  24. Robert of Rome says:

    Voted. Absolutely not.

  25. IoannesPetrus says:

    I just voted – of course it was “Absolutely not”! – but I also chose “own rules”.

    Did you all do this, though? I’m impressed!

    Absolutely not. She deserves to be excommunicated for defying church rules. = 47.64% (1,755 votes)
    Lewis is right: The real outrage is not her actions, but the Catholic stance on women. = 31.41% (1,157 votes)
    Churches get to set their own rules. If Lewis doesn’t like those rules, she should choose another church. = 14.6% (538 votes)
    I think Catholics should allow women priests, but Lewis is going about this the wrong way. = 6.35% (234 votes)

  26. fib09002 says:

    That we should fixate on such things as women’s ordination is preposterous, considering the present state of the Church. Of course, women’s ordination is not only undesirable in practical terms for many reasons which I need not go into here, but literally impossible as well. These women who act as if they were priests are not a threat to the Church. They know very well that they aren’t priests, which is why we find these “ordained” women continuously clamoring on, repeatedly and incessantly, about how the Pope needs to sanction women’s ordination. If they thought that they were priests, what would they have to complain about? Certainly Fr. Z hasn’t ever gone around protesting about how he was mistreated by the Church, because the Church refuses to ordain him, although he has already been ordained.

    But what is really threatening the Church is obvious. However, if I were to specify what the nature of that threat is, this comment would probably be deleted.

  27. Martlet says:

    Voted “absolutely not” and it is nice to see that opinion in the lead.

  28. SKAY says:

    Voted absolutely not. I am assuming that non Catholics who know absolutely nothing about the Catholic Church are able to vote on this. The questions seem to be set up to try to get the answer they favor to received the most votes — and we know a lot of political polls are set up this way.
    In a discussion with a friend one day who constantly refers to her church as ” bible based” did not understand why I said that a woman could never become a priest. My answer was – to ask her how many of the apostles were women. She was very quiet for a minute and then said —none. The conversation then changed.
    She had been sent to Catholic schools through high school during the 70’s and 80’s because of the sad state of the public schools where she lived. It is pretty clear that the Catholic schools where she lived at that time were not the best either. I like her a lot so our discussions are usually about the things we can agree on–and thankfully to Father Z and many of those who post comments here–I am able to try to explain with some degree of coherence the reasons behind some Church teachings that she misunderstands-when she is open to hearing it. The Lord is teaching me patience and charity –and I am grateful for that.

  29. Mike says:

    “That we should fixate on such things as women’s ordination is preposterous, considering the present state of the Church.”

    From the Satanic point of view, not preposterous at all. There are any number of peripheral issues, many purportedly focused on “peace” and “justice,” that distract Christians from building authentic relationships with God and neighbor. Global warmism is building traction, and it looks as if Notre Dame may be preparing to refocus on unilateral nuclear disarmament, so we must pray for the grace to persevere through additional rounds of preposterousness.

  30. Gaz says:

    I didn’t vote because none of the options are in accord with my view. Yes, excommunication is the automatic penalty because the offence grievously harms Holy Mother Church’s unity and is a grave distortion of the Sacrament of Holy Orders. However, excommunication is a plea for unity, it’s the Church on her knees begging for the sinner to return to the fold. Jerusalem, Jerusalem, convertere ad Dominum Deum tuum is the plea. It is Shepherd going after the one sheep. The last line of His Lordship’s letter, prayer for those involved, is the most important line.

  31. MacBride says:

    Nauseating…

    FYI..a comment posted in regards to this article:

    glanymor 11 minutes ago

    This poll has been hijacked by a group of ultra-conservative pre-Council of Trent Catholics. Treat the results with caution.

  32. friarpark says:

    the leader as of now is: Absolutely not. She deserves to be excommunicated for defying church rules. 42.85% (2,211 votes)

  33. JSII says:

    When will the 60’s just go away?!?!

  34. HeatherPA says:

    “When will the 60?s just go away?!?!”

    Sigh. I don’t know, but I hope soon. These people can’t live forever. Being raised by baby boomers was bad enough, but this enduring ignorant belligerence is just pathetic and irritating to me.

  35. I happened to be in Kalamazoo last Sunday, and received the letter in my bulletin while attending mass at the local shrine, St. Augustine. The pastor also spoke about it at the end of mass. I was pleasantly surprised at the strength of their statements, and also the compassion in which prayer for the woman was requested.
    My eldest daughter lives there, and I have noticed that there is large gay culture. Their “pride” parade is coming up. It is held right in the downtown area. It is publicized on billboards around the area. So, I guess I am not surprised about the poll. What’s a poll going to change anyways?

    I am just encouraged by the local church’s response, and am encouraging my daughter to send my grandson to St. Augustine’s for CCD.

  36. LarryW2LJ says:

    Voted “Absolutely Not”

    I guess “M Live” doesn’t know about the far reach of Fr. Z and his minions. :-)

  37. ajf1984 says:

    I had to giggle at the charge of being an “ultra-conservative pre-Council of Trent Catholic”! While I might assent to the first label in that string, I can’t remember the last time I attended a pre-Tridentine liturgy…Mozarabic and Sarum rites are awfully hard to come by here in WI! Unless, of course, the commenter meant to state that the Mass as celebrated before the Council is substantially the same as the one promulgated in Quo primum, in which case I guess it makes sense, although I can count only on 2 hands the number of Masses at which I have assisted according to the 1962 Missal. Silliness abounds; pray that Grace abounds all the more!

  38. frjim4321 says:

    I wonder what the level of training is for the women being ordained these days. More importantly I wonder about their suitability for ministry. I’m still open to an academic consideration of the validity of these ordinations, however I never met a women who either was ordained or wanted to be ordained that was capable of doing any real pastoral work. I would no sooner participate in one of their masses than I would a Greek Orthodox mass. It’s not in communion so for me its tantamount to an absurdity.

    Don’t get me wrong. I know and have worked with several women in ministry who are excellent. None of them are zealots for women’s ordination.

    I think one of the embarrassments of the last 25 years is the novelty of recent pronouncements intended to foreclose on the discussion. That’s not going to work. Flaunting one’s impotence is never really a good idea.

  39. Salvelinus says:

    I read this comment and laughed….

    glanymor 4 hours ago
    This poll has been hijacked by a group of ultra-conservative pre-Council of Trent Catholics. Treat the results with caution.

  40. The Masked Chicken says:

    “‘When will the 60?s just go away?!?!’

    Sigh. I don’t know, but I hope soon. These people can’t live forever. Being raised by baby boomers was bad enough, but this enduring ignorant belligerence is just pathetic and irritating to me.”

    Be very careful about vilifying a whole generation. Most Baby Boomers are not pot smoking, fornicating, gadabouts. They may have, as a whole, had more youthful indiscretions than some previous generations, but many either stayed with or reverted to moral behavior. Those who did not were heavily influenced by the post-WWII generation (who are, for some social aspects, the real culprits) and had to proceed without clear guidance from the Church, which was too busy doing other things. It is so easy to look back with the many resources available, today, and say, “Tsk, tsk,” to people who were lucky to get dribbles of information about Catholicism, post-Vatican II, that was fair and accurate. You try living a sane Catholic life when all around you is chaos and madness. Baby Boomers did the best they could with what they had to work with, which was not much.

    The Chicken

  41. wmeyer says:

    This poll has been hijacked by a group of ultra-conservative pre-Council of Trent Catholics. Treat the results with caution.

    Too funny. The “hi-jack” hasn’t entirely vanquished the effect of the Fishwrap voters and commenters. And I’m pretty sure the Council of Trent closed long before even I was born!

  42. Mike says:

    The USCCB needs to engage religious bodies like the ELCA with an important message:
    Knock it off.

  43. Fr. Jim implicitly concedes the erroneous premise that these women are really ordained, but he raises a good point about the fitness of these women for ministry. Notice that they never want ordination for the same reasons that a man with a legitimate vocation wants it. They want it because they crave power and attention and other self-serving ends. Moreover, they consider themselves entitled to ordination. Yet no one has a right to be ordained. What man with a legitimate calling considers himself entitled? On the contrary, he must keenly feel his unworthiness.

  44. Uxixu says:

    I didn’t get that from Fr. Jim, though I do think he’s in error in that post. The reason to avoid an Orthodox Divine Liturgy would be because of their schism, which is a far cry from the blatant blasphemy in this fauxdination (and the same Eastern Liturgy is available from Eastern Catholics in Communion with the Holy Father without that taint anyway). As with the Extraordinary Form of the Latin Rite, you wont’ see any laity (which obviously includes women) in the Sanctuary, regardless. The ancient faith of our Fathers, both Latin and Greek…

  45. dans0622 says:

    frjim4321: If you are referring to Ordinatio sacerdotalis and the passage that reads “Although the teaching that priestly ordination is to be reserved to men alone has been preserved by the constant and universal Tradition of the Church and firmly taught by the Magisterium in its more recent documents, at the present time in some places it is nonetheless considered still open to debate, or the Church’s judgment that women are not to be admitted to ordination is considered to have a merely disciplinary force.”, that statement does not “foreclose on the discussion.” It only makes it clear (again) what the belief and practice (“teaching”) of the Catholic Church is and, on that point, there can be no debate. People are free to discuss the issue. Let’s not pretend, though, that the teaching of the Church is unclear.

  46. Kathleen10 says:

    Uxixu, I had the same sentiment. Once I saw the photo, my heart melted a bit. It’s hard not to like a lady of 75 with red hair and flashy glasses. I have to remind myself that with their plans to preside at baptisms, weddings, and so on, they will be robbing people of the sacraments entirely.
    What a colossal waste it all is. Rather than pursue what is hopeless (although they do receive hope from some quarters) how much better it would be to find a way to serve God in some legitimate way. There are millions of ways they can serve without causing scandal and inciting division. Any nursing home at all contains lonely, sad little elderly people, and you could be a veritable lifeline for them, a reason to get out of bed in the morning and the delight of their existence. Every school contains children who’s lives are incredibly difficult, and you could volunteer on a regular basis to encourage them and help them learn to read, for example. These two people could do so much good if serving God was truly their one ambition. I hope they come to recognize it.

  47. Heather F says:

    I have no problem with female Protestant ministers. I’m related to a couple of them in fact. They don’t claim the ability to do anything that would actually require Holy Orders, since Protestant ecclesiology and the role of their clergy are so different. By all means, engage in the spiritual and corporal works of mercy as best you can, lead non-Holy-Orders-required prayer services, do the administration of your ecclesial community.

    But female Protestant ministers who think they are Catholic priests, not so much.

    An acquaintance of a friend was studying to become an Anglican priest-ette a number of years ago. She was quite upset that the priest at her Catholic parish (who knew about this) denied her communion. I always wondered if her Anglican formators knew that she still thought of herself as a Catholic in good standing. A rather odd lady. I felt sorry for her and wonder what happened to her, if she went through with it or if some grace prevailed.

  48. Mike says:

    “Ordination” of women priests is in large part no different that the “papacy” of “Pope Pius XIII,” AKA Lucian Pulvermacher, from October 24, 1998 to November 30, 2009. It is idiocy.

  49. Ben Kenobi says:

    “Baby Boomers did the best they could with what they had to work with, which was not much.”

    Balderdash. Complete and utter balderdash. Boomers are rightly being called out for their endorsement of heresy. True, every generation has their own failings, but Boomers have no excuse for endorsing all this nonsense and continuing to dump it on the Catholic church. I have always feared the day that a boomer becomes Pope, which, thankfully, has not happened yet.

  50. Ben Kenobi says:

    “There are millions of ways they can serve without causing scandal and inciting division. Any nursing home at all contains lonely, sad little elderly people, and you could be a veritable lifeline for them, a reason to get out of bed in the morning and the delight of their existence.”

    And that’s the root of the problem. This isn’t about serving God, but about serving themselves.

  51. The Masked Chicken says:

    “‘Baby Boomers did the best they could with what they had to work with, which was not much.’

    Balderdash. Complete and utter balderdash. Boomers are rightly being called out for their endorsement of heresy. True, every generation has their own failings, but Boomers have no excuse for endorsing all this nonsense and continuing to dump it on the Catholic church. I have always feared the day that a boomer becomes Pope, which, thankfully, has not happened yet.”

    I can pretty safely guess that you are not a Baby-Boomer (if you are, apologies). I have noticed this trend among late Gen-Xers and Millennials towards a seething hostility to the Baby Boomers. It betrays a too simplistic understanding of history and a willingness to look for scape-goats. The simple fact is that most of the people in their mid-fifties to late sixties (the Baby Boom generation) who are alive, today, are not heretics (Fr. Z. is very close to being a Baby Boomer, if memory serves). During the late-1960’s to late-1970’s, a subset of youth, led by a Bohemian subset of post-WWII malcontents, carried forward to its logical conclusion the antinomianism of the Beat generation. This social movement was allowed to occur, in some ways, because, unlike the 1920’s, which saw a similar post-War youth movement, the Catholic Church was in a state of disarray.

    The moral teachings of the past were being thrown out the window, so the laity were told. How can one blame the ignorant youth of the period for their promiscuity when even seasoned theologians were calling for the widespread adoption of contraception and a much smaller contingent was redefining the criteria of what pre-martial sex meant. It was an age of rampant scientism. One need only compare the moral views expressed on Star Trek TOS, which, while still steeped in pre-1960’s moralism, contained a far too rosy view of the place of science in the future of modern life, to the utter moral relativism of a generation later, expressed in Star Trek TNG, Deep Space 9, and Voyager, which, while retaining the scientism, showed the disintegration of any consistent frame of moral reasoning.

    Simply put, the Baby Boom generation was off-kilter because the entire period was off-kilter. They did not cause this. The mini-skirt was not invented by a Baby-Boomer. Neither was the Pill. The Baby-Boomers were pawns in a much bigger game. The simple fact is that Baby-Boomers, in and of themselves, have produced remarkably very little of historical significance, but one cannot use the failings of a narcissistic older women (who, by the way, at 75 years of age is not even in the Baby-Boom generation) or even a subset of nuns as an excuse to condemn an entire generation.

    The tendency towards immediacy and the present moment among some current youth does not bode well for the thought that they might abstract the true meanings of events from history. If we could invent a time machine and send some of them back to 1965 with just the knowledge of someone from that period, one wonders if they would have done anything differently. It is so easy to think oneself morally superior to the past, when, the fact is often that we would have done no better.

    The Chicken

  52. chantgirl says:

    Chicken- I would guess that a component of the seething hostility of Gen-Xers and millenials towards the boomers would be the havoc wreaked by the divorce epidemic of the boomers’ generation. While my own boomer parents did not divorce, many of my friends’ lives were torn apart as children because of their parents’ selfish behavior. Children of the boomers were told that life would be happier if their parents could split and find themselves and marry their new soulmates. The parents got to act like they were twenty-one again, and the children were left with heartache and a fear of commitment. Anyway, I digress.

    I wonder if these women would still want to be priests if they actually had to submit to a male bishop?

  53. robtbrown says:

    I’m a charter member of the Baby Boomers, and we had very little to do with the current mess in the Church or society. Actually, social changes began earlier, with those who were 18 in 1960. Those were the first who went through adolescence during post WWII prosperity. Their parents, the ones who survived WWII, grew up in the depression, were determined their children would not lack for material advantages. High school students began to have cars.

    The beginnings of the collapse of the Church and society came into being long before the Boomers were Babies. The square cornered, by the numbers way of looking at things came to an end. And when it did, it took with it any sense of the transcendent

  54. The Masked Chicken says:

    “Chicken- I would guess that a component of the seething hostility of Gen-Xers and millenials towards the boomers would be the havoc wreaked by the divorce epidemic of the boomers’ generation.”

    It was 40-something members of the WWII generation that passed the no-fault divorce laws in the middle-to-late 1960’s to the early 1970’s, not the Baby-Boomers. It was the parents of the Baby-Boomers who went along with it and stopped tsk-tsking. The Baby-Boom generation is not the primary cause of the problem. They are a stop along the way. The problems go back to the German Modernist movement with its pseudo-scientific concept of historical progress that led to a de-mystification of the transcendent and an over-emphasis on what was Logical Positivism. You see the same phenomenal rise in divorce after World War I. The poison was already in the veins. Unlike after WWII, the Church had not, yet, been infected at the seminary level after WWI, so the Church was able to put up a united front against the divorce phenomenon and, although there are no reliable statistics of which I am aware, it seems that there was not a large increase in Catholic divorces during this time.

    After WWII, things were different. When the inevitable increase in divorces began, again (because no one had to stay together any longer – divorces, inevitably, increase during times of prosperity and alienation), the Church , itself was in a turmoil, at least at the seminary level, which was the teaching venue for most priests formed during that period. With the increased emphasis on science (especially psychology) and the decrease in the mystical, priests were looking for their cues to human behavior not in sin and temptation, but in the Id, the Ego, and the Superego. Marriage became less about sacraments and more about satisfaction.

    Had the Church not been infected from within, there is a good chance that it would have held out and quashed the contraceptive movement (which, after all, was started and perpetuated by dissident Catholics). As it were, the Church was trying to come to grips with the increasing materialism of the world by hosting a Council (Vatican II), not realizing that traitors were in their midst. The resulting disarray, especially on a moral level, let priests make conscience into a petty god and rob the youth of any substantial wisdom from the past experiences of the Church.

    Make no mistake, the Baby-Boomers are effects, not causes of the current mess in society. If the Church had been strong on divorce in 1968, there would be no divorce crisis within the Church, today. If you want to blame anybody, blame the subversive movements within Protestantism that spilled into the Church.

    “Their parents, the ones who survived WWII, grew up in the depression, were determined their children would not lack for material advantages. High school students began to have cars.”

    This is the common wisdom taught in high school history courses, but it is too simple. The generation involved in WWII did not spoil their kids, so much as try to maintain an image of corporate unity. The 1950’s was the era of The Corporation Man, which reflected the dominant societal attitude of necessary cooperation and assimilation during both the depression and the military in WWII. It was the Baby-Boom generation that started spoiling their kids rotten to make up for the divorces.

    The Chicken

  55. robtbrown says:

    This is the common wisdom taught in high school history courses, but it is too simple. The generation involved in WWII did not spoil their kids, so much as try to maintain an image of corporate unity. The 1950?s was the era of The Corporation Man, which reflected the dominant societal attitude of necessary cooperation and assimilation during both the depression and the military in WWII. It was the Baby-Boom generation that started spoiling their kids rotten to make up for the divorces.

    The Chicken

    I stay away from the word “spoil”. It sounds out of touch, narrow minded, and little else than weak excuse for failure.

    Instead, I refer to independence. Starting with the WWII prosperity in the mid 50’s, adolescent independence began to increase. Then it took a big jump in the late 60’s, with a push from the Viet Nam War, and continues to increase. (NB: In was during the era of your Corporation Man that Hemingway was so popular—he was hardly writing about cooperation.)

    Those “spoiled” people you refer to are ripe for conversion, but where are the laborers in the vineyard?

    Losers seem always to have excuses for failure. While the hierarchy was making moaning about the empty seminaries and houses of religion, John Senior was converting about 100 people, producing about 20 priests (2 became bishops) and 2 French nuns. The establishment of Clear Creek Abbey followed. Meanwhile, bishops, priests, and religious were contemplating their navels and persecuting those who wanted Latin liturgy. BTW, when Senior was teaching he was opposed by a coalition of anti-Catholic professors at KU, local Jesuits, and the Archbishop.

    The simple truth is that the Church has not been much of a presence for those of university age for some time. With a few bare exceptions like the Lincoln Diocese, Newman Centers seldom have produced priests and religious—mostly they are little else than a parish near the campus. And for years Church run universities like Notre Dame or DePaul have had their version of the USSR 5 year plans, which were punctuated by the annual announcement of another crop failure.

    Instead, vocations to the priesthood or religious life have come from places like Thomas Aquinas College and Christendom College.