Rome Day 1: The Stacks

I am in Rome for some research.  Happily I’ll meet with friends too.

Last night we went for some supper… as one does.


A view during the stroll home.


This morning I walked by two of the famous “Talking Statues”.

  

A bit of atmosphere.

I didn’t, if you are wondering.  I only use the Veyron near San Pietro.

Up the ramp to my old school.

The research begineth.   I’ve written up a bunch of slips for books from the stacks. Now I am exploring the dictionaries, etc., for more bibliography.

UPDATE:

It was a great day at the library.  On the way to supper, I saw a great display of miniature military figures.

 

Something very like Sardine in saor.

Tagliolini al’astice.

Orata.

 

 

This was great.

On the way home.
  

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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10 Responses to Rome Day 1: The Stacks

  1. Incaelo says:

    Ah, Cardinal Müller’s title church :)

  2. The Masked Chicken says:

    The Stacks…does that refer to pancakes or books, hmm… :)

    I thought I heard that the Vatican Library was trying to digitize its collection. If only we didn’t have such draconian copyright laws, it would be so nice to have all of the world’s knowledge at ones fingertips. I love the feel of paper, but I’ll never have the chance to rummage around in dank dusty libraries in foreign countries. I have to live vicariously through electrons bouncing off a screen. If you haven’t done so, take you children to a really old (or at least moderately old) library and turn them loose on the stacks. It is one of the best ways to encourage a life-long passion for books and learning. Who knows what they might discover while wandering around.

    The Chicken

  3. Auggie says:

    Happy studies, Fr. Z.

  4. drohan says:

    Nothing is more fun than being alone, or semi-alone with a pile of books and other research materials. The sheer volume of the printed word, and the amount of dedication the staff has to have to keep it in order is something to behold wherever you are. I love being in research libraries of large (Big 10ish) American Universities. I bet the Vatican’s library is like going from Double A to the Majors by comparison.

    Happy studies. For every paper or thesis or whatever, the research was always the most fun part. The actual typing of the piece not-so-much. Godspeed Father. Thanks for the posts!

  5. A lovely Ferrari, Father, but then how many of them are not lovely?
    On a more serious note, you have my prayers that your studies will be fruitful, and enjoyable.

    Pax et bonum,
    Keith Töpfer

  6. Art says:

    Father, you will be nice and let the Holy Father have a test drive of your Veyron when he asks, won’t you?

  7. marcelus says:

    Il Pasquino

  8. wanda says:

    What did the statues really say?

  9. Venerator Sti Lot says:

    The good soul depicted with the little flowing barrel reminds me of Michelangelo somehow (I can’t place why). What do ‘we’ know about him, and is his really a water barrel? (Or does the water depict something made with human hands?)

  10. marcelus says:

    The second statue is called the pasquin , not even sure of the word exists in English or il pasquino. there is a story I can not recall about it. must go back to my Lanciani. However the word in Italian and Spanish pasquin , meaning a derogatory, cheap yellow press comes from the name of the statue