70th Anniversary of end of WWII

Today was the 70th anniversary of the formal surrender of Japan.  HERE

The instrument of surrender was signed aboard USS Missouri on 2 Sept 1945.

Amazing.

Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu sign Japanese Instrument of Surrender, a  document  signed on the deck of the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on Sept. 2 1945 in Japan. (AP Photo/pool/Life)

Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu sign Japanese Instrument of Surrender, a document signed on the deck of the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on Sept. 2 1945 in Japan. (AP Photo/pool/Life)

Also on this day, the Battle of Actium was fought in 31 BC when Octavian bested the fleet of Mark Anthony and Cleopatra.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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4 Responses to 70th Anniversary of end of WWII

  1. Maltese says:

    Amazing indeed! Unfortunately, the Chinese now have missiles capable of destroying our carriers from space–self-guided (we also, of course, have that technology, since the Chinese stole it from us.) I don’t worry too much about the Chinese, since their economy is tied in with ours, but I worry if that tie is ever broken.

  2. Andreas says:

    …and as a recently retired Navy officer, I couldn’t resist adding that on this day back in 1775, General George Washington commissioned the very first American warship, the Hannah.

  3. Venerator Sti Lot says:

    Alas, MacArthur was not allowed to prosecute the Korean War properly when, all too soon, that particular bit of Communist imperialism took an active approach on the Peninsula. How many millions of Korean lives that would have saved! And the contours of contemporary nuclear proliferation and enduring Communist and other not unrelated tyrannies would probably be very different as well.

  4. DeGaulle says:

    Maltese, I wouldn’t hold too much store with the Chinese economy continuing to be tied in with that of the U.S. The incredible amount of debt that the Chinese have accumulated may soon necessitate their looking for the return of the money they have lent to your country in order to repay this. It may soon mean the end of the U.S. borrowing money from the Chinese to buy the products made by the Chinese workers in jobs that were exported from the U.S. to China. From being economic allies the two countries may return to being economic rivals. Or worse.