A proposal for a “traditional” edition of the Ordinary Form missal in English

At NLM Shawn Tribe has offered a proposal for an Ordinary Form Roman Missal with the new, corrected translation in a format much like the usual editions of the older Missale Romanum.  He has some sample pages.

If an edition of the new translation were offered like this, I would recommend it and no other.

Samples of what he has come up with.  You can see more there.

And …

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24 Responses to A proposal for a “traditional” edition of the Ordinary Form missal in English

  1. cowboy says:

    Nice! But shouldn’t the English be side-by-side with Latin? That would be my only amendment…

  2. qowieury says:

    That does look very nice. It has a beauty that is lacking from modern missals.

  3. Legisperitus says:

    This is the kind of thing where just seeing it done makes you wonder why it hasn’t been done.

  4. wmeyer says:

    Dare we hope? So far, I have seen nothing about the publication of hand missals for the third edition.

  5. wmeyer says:

    As to putting the translations side by side, as desirable as that may be, I would be curious to know how much of a challenge that is these days. Having looked for solutions to paragraph synchronization, I can say with certainty that our desktop tools do not provide any simple solution. I finally made use of TeX, which is not for the faint of heart. Of course, I expect that typesetting programs — are they still called that, when type is no longer used? — have more tools in support of uncommon formats.

  6. RichR says:

    Dare we hope? So far, I have seen nothing about the publication of hand missals for the third edition.

    I’ve heard of a few……

    Daily Roman Missal: http://www.theologicalforum.org/default.asp?ci=25

    St. Joseph’s Sunday Missal(CBP): http://www.catholiccompany.com/st-joseph-sunday-missal-vinyl-cover-p1111407/?sli=1111408

    St. Paul Sunday Missal: http://www.catholiccompany.com/saint-paul-sunday-missal-p1111703/

  7. Geoffrey says:

    A major problem is the national episcopal conferences. I have been in touch with various authorities (ICEL, USCCB, etc.), and creating a universal Latin and English altar Missal for liturgical use is almost impossible without some sort of direct intervention of the Holy See. Each episcopal conference needs to approve the text to be used in their territory. Hence the USCCB will not give approval to a missal with British English, and vice-versa. It just isn’t financially feasible for a small Catholic publishing house to produce Latin-English altar Missals according to each national episcopal conference, etc. But we’re working on it…

  8. Geoffrey,

    Is is not true–as I have previously understood–that the British and U.S. English translations of the Mass prayers themselves correspond so closely that users in one country could just as well use the one from the other?

    Preferably, such a Latin-English hand missal would use the RSV for the scriptural readings, since it corresponds much more closely (i.e., literally) with the Church’s official New Vulgate Latin than either the New Jerusalem of the British missal or the New American of the U.S. missal.

    In this connection, I wonder whether there is any official requirement for the content of a hand missal for sale to whomever wants to buy it and use it in the pew. Whereas there are severe strictures on altar missal–whose word for word content is determined by the appropriate bishops conference. Certainly, at a Latin Novus Ordo, the pew sitter can use any English translation he wants to, or is available to him, and different ones are available in Latin-English OF missalettes in use various places.

    Just as any two different Latin-English EF missals will ordinarily have different English translations, each procured by its own editor/publisher.

  9. BobP says:

    No offense but this reminds me of the prayer book I had in kindergarten. I really don’t see the practical value of the two columns, though. It’s too newspaper-looking.

  10. BobP says:

    Strike that. I was thinking hand missal, not the actual missal the priest uses. Still, it’s depressing without the Latin.

  11. Supertradmum says:

    For those in England, there is a nice, leather edition, no artwork, but Latin and English from CTS for Sunday. The Daily Missal is yet to be published.

  12. dominic1955 says:

    This, to me, seems like a no-brainer. I suppose we know why they didn’t just copy the basic format of the old missals in the “Sacramentary” but now it seems obvious that it should be done this way.

    As to hand missals in the NO, personally, I found them about worthless. There are way too many options in the NO to be able to use them the same way you can in the TLM and none of the NO hand missals that I’ve seen were even half as good of devotional books as my Angelus Press TLM missal.

  13. Sam Urfer says:

    As dominic1955 points out, one of the problems with the OF is that a Tridentine style hand-missal is, in fact, impossible with the way the readings are set up. Last I checked, the St. Joseph hand missals needed four volumes to cover the full liturgical calendar. This is why the one-year lectionary is superior, among other reasons.

  14. Random Friar says:

    I like! For the Latinists, I would prefer a separate section in Latin, rather than side-by-side. Too “busy” otherwise.

  15. Hidden One says:

    Looks good to me.

    I echo the Latin/English request… because making it easier for a priest to return Latin to the Ordinary Form is a very good thing.

  16. Geoffrey says:

    “Is is not true–as I have previously understood–that the British and U.S. English translations of the Mass prayers themselves correspond so closely that users in one country could just as well use the one from the other?”

    A hand missal for personal devotion, yes. However such a book still needs some sort of ecclesiastical approval, and a national bishop’s conference will only approve a publication with the appropriate texts for that country… lectionary included. I am a publisher and we are working on it. Spare us a prayer or two… and stay tuned!

  17. jesusthroughmary says:

    Of course, rendering the Mass in the vernacular has made the concept of a hand missal obsolete; since one is now capable, thanks to the tireless work of the progressives, of perfectly comprehending the Mass in real time, one needs no external tools to assist oneself in that regard.

  18. dominic1955 says:

    It is not just the readings (although that is a big part of it), but the EPs, the prefaces, and the saints days. With the deluge of options of where the priest might go with it, a NO hand missal is rendered a reference book. That is what I use mine for (and I don’t go to the NO very often anyway).

    Also, like I alluded to above, my TLM Angelus Press (the Baronius is very similar) gives me most of the traditional liturgy of the Church in one handy little volume. Plus, it has lots of good devotional material. The NO missals are unwieldly (especially the large print versions, which are like desk dictionaries), and just not the same kind of prayer companion that a good TLM hand missal is.

  19. benedictgal says:

    @jesusthroughmary

    While you might have a point, there is another factor that should be considered. Down here in the South Texas hinterland, we have a plethora of Masses in Spanish. I am not a native Spanish speaker and it does help to have an English daily hand missal so that I can follow along. In fact, the Latin does help, as I quietly recite the prayers in Latin.

  20. “one is now capable, thanks to the tireless work of the progressives, of perfectly comprehending the Mass in real time, one needs no external tools to assist oneself in that regard.”

    Of course, I realize you don’t mean this seriously. (Surely not!) But it seems worth mentioning explicitly that very few if anyone is able to “perfectly comprehend the Mass” or anything else similarly subtle and complex merely upon hearing it proclaimed aloud. (After forty years as a professor, I certainly how much goes in one ear and out the other.)

    The real use of a hand missal is to treasure and study in preparation for Mass as well as to use at Mass (whatever the language, familiar or not)–following the readings, for instance, since many people are visual rather than audial, and need to see it in order to assimilate it. Once pew sitters are carrying hand missals again, perhaps we will see “actual participation” again.

  21. jesusthroughmary says:

    Henry Edwards -

    I have actually been scandalized watching how the relentless pursuit of making the Mass more understandable has made it far less understood by the faithful.

  22. Supplex says:

    I’d have to agree with those who would like to see Latin & English side by side.

    It is so important that those who attend the OF also feel that link to tradition and this missal, along of course with Gregorian chant at the masses, would help.

  23. DominiSumus says:

    Although that style Roman Missal may be good for the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, where nearly all the prayers are said quietly by the priest, I think the current sense line layout is important during the Ordinary Form of the Mass so the priest can more easily pronounce the sentences correctly for easier comprehension. As I see it, the traditional layout encourages the priest to offer the prayers quickly and without regard for sentence structure, while the sense line format gives the priest some direction and encourages him to slow down and offer the prayers with the appropriate vocal intonation.

  24. jaykay says:

    Random Friar says: “For the Latinists, I would prefer a separate section in Latin, rather than side-by-side. Too “busy” otherwise.”

    I entirely agree. As I understand it, TLM altar missals were/are entirely in Latin. The Novus Ordo altar missals I have seen are in English, but with a Latin section containing certain Masses at the rear. But I don’t think altar missals ever had a parallel Latin/English translation, in the way that a hand missal – I mean really the TLM one – commonly does.

    Shawn Tribe’s proposal is very elegant and extremely redolent of the TLM altar missals. I think it’s a very valuable exercise in showing continuity in actual practice. If I were a priest and such a missal were available I would be very anxious to get one.