Rome – Day 5: Galleries and Lessons

This morning I started in the Galleries of the Palace of the Doria Pamphilij. It has been years since my last visit.

I got the audio guide, which was sprinkled through with charming accounts of family history by one of the members of the family who still live in the palace.

It’s quite a treat.  Don’t miss it.  You can get a photo pass.

 

One of my favorite renditions of a popular theme in it’s era.

 

When you go to the Gallery, don’t miss learning about this one.  Donna Olimpia.  She must have been a fright to live with.  At one point she talked Innocent X, her brother in law, out of the licenses for the brothels in Rome, arguing that it wasn’t right for the Holy See to have them.  She immediately took the income and put the family crest over the doors.  At one point she locked the Pope in his room.  Interesting.

 

I told you the other day that my cincture disintegrated.  So… thanks to anyone who made a donation.  I had to buy some new things.

A wall near St. Andrea della Valle where you can still see traces of the graffiti left by invaders from the Sack of Rome.

 

At Ss. Trinità for Mass, I found Father Vicarius teaching a deacon from the NAC how to say the Extraordinary Form.

Lunch.

 

On my way back from errands in the evening.   The statues on the “Angel Bridge” are amazing.  You never get tired of them.

The view after supper.  Alas the Jesuits have this one.   For now.

Please share this post!
Share

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in On the road, Seminarians and Seminaries, SUMMORUM PONTIFICUM, What Fr. Z is up to. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Rome – Day 5: Galleries and Lessons

  1. “At Ss. Trinità for Mass, I found Father Vicarius teaching a deacon from the NAC how to say the Extraordinary Form.”

    Brick for brick! Good news!

  2. St Donatus says:

    Okay, this is a new one on me. Did the Church run brothels?

    When you go to the Gallery, don’t miss learning about this one. Donna Olimpia. She must have been a fright to live with. At one point she talked Innocent X, her brother in law, out of the licenses for the brothels in Rome, arguing that it wasn’t right for the Holy See to have them. She immediately took the income and put the family crest over the doors. At one point she locked the Pope in his room. Interesting.

    I found some information on the web but don’t know how accurate it is. I understand that the Church has tolerated sinful behavior in the past due to the force of the state, but actually participating in sin. Of course, humans will make mistakes and as we have seen in recent years, some of those mistakes can cost the souls of the faithful.

    Do you know anything about this history?

  3. benedetta says:

    Was Rome sacked by invaders Fr.? I must have missed that bit as I scrolled along my google algorithm amalgamated headlines incorporated today. What a pity…Oh well.

  4. Venerator Sti Lot says:

    benedetta,

    Do you happen to know Hella Haasse’s The Scarlet City: A Novel of 16th-century Italy (1952)? It has a pretty hair-raising treatment of the Sack of Rome in 1527 – or is Fr. Z referring to one of the various earlier Sacks?

  5. benedetta says:

    V. S. Lot,
    That sounds like an excellent read! I will be sure to check it out. I had presumed that graffiti was left behind in some fairly more recent occurrence which may or may not have flashed by the various outlets, news sources, email blasts, or leafletting I receive in real time from my cave and/or bunker.
    Yours etc.

  6. jameeka says:

    Out of charity, I will not say who “Donna Olimpia” reminds me of…but poor Innocent X!

  7. Cantor says:

    At one point she locked the Pope in his room. Interesting.

    Was the Swiss Guard – then in town for a century and a half – perhaps not as efficient as it is today, or were the guards in on the plot?!

  8. Laura R. says:

    Anyone interested in finding out more about Donna Olimpia might take a look at Mistress of the Vatican by Eleanor Herman. An non-Catholic friend gave it to me several years ago; I didn’t find it especially edifying but it’s an interesting look at the papacy in those times.

  9. The Cobbler says:

    “For now,” he says, as if he knew of plans to alter the circumstance in question.

Comments are closed.