Fr. Z’s analysis of Mr. Allen’s analysis of Card. Pell going to Rome

My friend John L. Allen Jr., the fair-minded, the nearly ubiquitous, who sadly still writes for the ultra-liberal NRC, analyzes the possibility that the next Prefect for the Congregation for Bishops may be Sydney’s George Card. Pell.

Here is the meat of his article with my emphases and comments.

[...]

[I]f Pell is indeed the new prefect, it would be a landmark move for at least four reasons.

First, the appointment would be widely seen as a victory for the conservative wing of the church, since Pell has long been an outspoken voice for conservative positions on virtually every issue in Catholic life. He’s a classic example of “evangelical Catholicism,” meaning that fostering a strong sense of traditional Catholic identity in contrast to secularism is his top concern. [I think that is Pope Benedict's top concern as well.] Putting Pell at the helm of the Congregation for Bishops would help ensure a robustly “evangelical” stamp on bishops’ appointments around the world.

Second, a Pell appointment would be another victory for the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith – known in Rome as the “Holy Office” and tagged by the Italians la Suprema, the “supreme” congregation – in its long-running rivalry with the Secretariat of State. [The CDF should be La Suprema.] At a very broad level of generalization, senior officials such as Re who come out of the Vatican’s diplomatic corps are generally known as middle-of-the-road pragmatists, [Some would suggest left of center.] while those who move in the world of the Holy Office typically are more concerned with doctrinal clarity. That’s not to say theologians can’t be flexible, or that diplomats aren’t concerned with ultimate truth, but there is nonetheless a cultural and psychological distinction between the two worlds. [Okay... that was a bit thin.]

Pell is not a theologian by training – his Ph.D. from Oxford is actually in church history. Yet in the eternal tension between the Holy Office and the diplomats, his affinity is very much with the former. He served as a member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith between 1900 and 2000, while he was an auxiliary bishop of Melbourne and later archbishop. He’s well known to the pope, and openly campaigned for the election of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger during the conclave of April 2005.  [It is not necessary that the Prefect of a Congregation be a theologian, not even for the CDF.  The Prefect has to make sure that things get done.  You can bring in theologians for the theology.  They are not lacking, even in Rome!]

The election of a pope from the Holy Office obviously implied a shift in power within the Vatican, and the appointment of Pell to the Congregation for Bishops – traditionally considered the most important Vatican office after the Secretariat of State and the Congregation for the Faith – would more or less make things complete. The current Secretary of State, Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, is himself a product of the Holy Office, having served as Ratzinger’s top aide there from 1995 to 2002.

To date, Benedict XVI has appointed six of the nine prefects of Vatican congregations. (Re, along with Cardinals Franc Rodé in Religious and Zenon Grocholewski in Education, are holdovers from John Paul II). Most of Benedict’s prefects are part of his extended network from the Holy Office: Spanish Cardinal Antonio Cañizares at the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments is a former member of the Congregation for the Faith known as the “little Ratzinger” for his closeness to the pope, and his top deputy is American Archbishop Augustine Di Noia – another former Ratzinger aide. Archbishop Angelo Amato at the Congregation for the Causes of Saints succeeded Bertone as Ratzinger’s secretary in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and American Cardinal William Levada in the Holy Office worked under Ratzinger and later served as a member of the congregation.

Traditionally, [Hmmm... ] it’s been considered natural for the prefect of the Congregation for Bishops to come out of the Secretariat of State, [Card. Gantin doesn't really fit that too well... nor did Moreira Neves...  but let's go on.] since the “grunt work” in preparing bishops’ appointments is generally performed by the nuncio, or papal ambassador, in a given country. Putting someone with a Holy Office background in role would solidify a tendency to value clarity over diplomatic skill in grooming prospective bishops.

Third, naming Pell to head the Congregation for Bishops would also mean another non-Italian, and another English-speaker, in a key leadership role. It would leave Amato as the lone Italian prefect of a congregation in Benedict’s Vatican, and would also mean that English-speakers hold two of the three Vatican jobs traditionally regarded as most powerful after the papacy itself. [And that might say something about the Holy Father's desire that Congregations actually get things done.]

Especially at a time when the role of the Vatican and of bishops around the world is under fire in the English-speaking world because of the sexual abuse crisis, that might be considered an advantage. Notably, the question of accountability for bishops who mismanaged the crisis – and of crafting new accountability measures to ensure that such mistakes don’t happen again – falls into the bailiwick of the Congregation for Bishops.

Fourth, naming Pell could also be a minor victory for transparency and openness in the Vatican. Over his long career, Pell has long been a media favorite because he always makes himself available to journalists and speaks his mind. [I can attest to that.] One can agree or disagree with what he’s got to say, but his fearlessness and candor are nonetheless somewhat rare commodities at senior levels of the church.

[...]

 

You can read the rest over there.

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18 Responses to Fr. Z’s analysis of Mr. Allen’s analysis of Card. Pell going to Rome

  1. robtbrown says:

    Traditionally, it’s been considered natural for the prefect of the Congregation for Bishops to come out of the Secretariat of State, since the “grunt work” in preparing bishops’ appointments is generally performed by the nuncio, or papal ambassador, in a given country. Putting someone with a Holy Office background in role would solidify a tendency to value clarity over diplomatic skill in grooming prospective bishops.

    This seems a bit of an oversimplification. Although the terna is submitted by the nunzio, there is much input from influential bishops (incl the metropolitian) within the nation. That’s why the retirement of Cardinal Mahoney is important.

    And someone like Cardinal Rigali is both influential within the US and a member of the Cong of Bishops. He was also a member of the Congregation of the SCDF, whose prefect was the present pope.

  2. Stephen Morgan says:

    Let’s get this clear – and Fr Z when you next speak to your friend John Allen perhaps you can put him right – Cardinal Pell’s DPhil (the Oxford doctorate) is in Theology not Church History. Although the thesis title was ‘The exercise of authority in early Christianity from about 170 to about 270′ it is a work of historical theology not the history of theology. I read it in Bodley last week. It’s a very fine piece of work which explains a great deal about George Pell the bishop.

  3. Thomas S says:

    “He served as a member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith between 1900 and 2000, while he was an auxiliary bishop of Melbourne and later archbishop.”

    Good Lord! Shouldn’t he be allowed to retire?

  4. pelerin says:

    I agree with Thomas S – after such a length of service he deserves a well-earned rest!

  5. robtbrown says:

    “He served as a member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith between 1900 and 2000, while he was an auxiliary bishop of Melbourne and later archbishop.”
    Good Lord! Shouldn’t he be allowed to retire?
    Comment by Thomas S

    Being a member of a Congregation is a part time job. They are called to Rome only a few times a year.

  6. gambletrainman says:

    robtbrown..read the dates given very carefully. I started to say something, but Thoas S beat me to it.

  7. pelerin says:

    I don’t think robtbrown has quite got it!!

  8. JPG says:

    Theologian or not, saying Cardinal Pell is not a theologian holds as much weight in my mind as “Cardinal Ratzinger is not a liturgist”.
    JPG

  9. JARay says:

    The correct dates of Cardinal Pell’s membership of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith are 1990-2000. The numbers “9″ and “0″ are next to each other on your keyboard. That’s how this misprint happened!

  10. nzcatholic says:

    If Cardinal Pell goes to Rome I wonder who will become Archbishop of Sydney? Im praying that Bishop Elliot an assistant bishop in Melbourne and has been in charge of accomadating Anglican Catholics may get a promotion

  11. Stephen Morgan: Thanks for that! I will pass it along. I hope you are well.

  12. robtbrown says:

    I don’t think robtbrown has quite got it!!
    Comment by pelerin

    You’re right. I read it as he thought it, not as he wrote it.

  13. TJerome says:

    Cardinal Pell would be a fabulous appointment. I have always found him worth listening to. Although he is well aware of the “world” his deep love of the Church and his commonsense always come ringing through. I recall he was a star rugby player in his youth. What better preparation can there be for being in charge of this Congregation!!

  14. Tantum Ergo says:

    “He served as a member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith between 1900 and 2000″
    What’s the big deal? After all, Rome IS the Eternal City.”

  15. RMT says:

    Well technically he did serve in-between 1900 and 2000–though not for the whole century…

  16. IS says:

    Have a look at the most recent appointment as auxiliary of Sydney.

    In Australia we are a tad worried.

  17. Anthony OPL says:

    We still don’t know anything at all about any prospective move – all this hubbub seems based on the sole fact of Cardinal Pell’s private audience with the Holy Father a week or two ago. The thing is, he gets heaps of those – he’s not just the effective primate of an entire continent, he’s also the head of Vox Clara. He’s also got an imminent canonisation (Bl Mary of the Cross) this year, and who knows what other duties.

    With all that said, if in his wisdom the Holy Father should bring His Eminence to Rome on a more permanent basis, Sydney would at once rejoice (at the honour) and lament (at the loss). Who indeed could replace our beloved Cardinal Archbishop?

  18. From an Irish perspective: we are expecting more resignations here (National Audit of the Church’s handling of CSA to be published soon) so if Pell does move to Rome and gets to choose the next generation of bishops the Irish Church is in for a much needed shake-up! O that the Lord would here our prayer! By the way I met Pell last year and he’s a very nice man but huge – I’m six foot and he towered over me.