The Feeder Feed: museum edition

Here is an ancient edition of The Feeder Feed live from the Metropolitan Museum in NYC.

Behold a mid 3rd century mosaic from N. Africa. The Nile imagery suggests Egypt, but such exotic images were not uncommon elsewhere.

In this part you can see a crane about to feed on the eye of the Pygmy he is attacking.

A different version of The Feeder Feed.

Somewhat later… a great deal later… we have this sardonic owl.

He has reason to be sardonic, since he is on a Renaissance Hungarian jousting targe.

He says: “Though I am hated by all birds, I nevertheless rather enjoy that.”

I dedicate this in particular to a certain Manhattan cleric who – so I am told – has been dismissive of these ornithological posts.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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7 Responses to The Feeder Feed: museum edition

  1. trentecoastal39 says:

    I dedicate this in particular to a certain Manhattan cleric who – so I am told – has been dismissive of these ornithological posts

    WHOA,What do You Mean By That?

  2. dawnmaria says:

    Gives new meaning to the word “sardonic.”

  3. Heh, probably one of Fr. Z’s buddies. Nobody like a friend to give you a hard time, and nobody like a New Yorker to give you the bird. So to speak. :)

  4. Random Friar says:

    Hmm… that might make a nice motto for a Cardinal’s coat of arms, if his brethren have a good sense of humor.

  5. anna 6 says:

    They really did an awesome job with the “new” Greek and Roman galleries…one of my favorite NY spots!

  6. pforrester says:

    LOL regarding the dismissive cleric and unpopular owl.:)

  7. AnAmericanMother says:

    This business about the owl got around.

    The 12th century English poem The Owl and the Nightingale references this as well – the Nightingale points out that the Owl is “loÞ al feulkunne” – “loathed by all fowlkind” = “hated by all birds”, “laidly to behold and loathly in many ways”.

    We have a nesting pair in our backyard, and just like the Owl in the poem they are entertaining when they sing at night.