New College to open in Bp. Finn’s diocese

Very cool brick by brick news from the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph, where Most Rev. Robert Finn is, by the grace of God, bishop.

Go now to the side bar of this blog and look for the feed of the Cardinal Newman Society.  There you will find a story to click about a ….

Small College Could Open in KC-St. Joseph Diocese

The Kansas City Star reports that the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph is considering allowing a nonprofit group from Texas to open a small college in their diocesan headquarters.

According to diocesan officials, The Walsingham Society of Christian Culture and Western Civilization wants to establish a Christ College in Kansas City. The group is considering leasing space from the diocese.

The College would offer a Catholic, seminar-based, Great Books course of study. The intention is to begin a pilot program, with a full academic program beginning in the fall of 2014.

“We are encouraged by the reception from many in the local Catholic community, and we appreciate the welcome and blessing from the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph,” said Brinton Smith, president of The Walsingham Society. “We intend to be faithful in our teaching to the doctrine of the Church, but Christ College is otherwise an independent institution.”

[…]

Go read there and dig into the links.

Another Catholic response to the mind-repressing, gonad-stimulating, soul-annihilating main-stream education “opportunities” which are, so to speak, “out there”.

This is very cool.

 

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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8 Responses to New College to open in Bp. Finn’s diocese

  1. oldcanon2257 says:

    Thanks be to God for giving us Catholics in the United States such shepherds as Bishops Finn, Sample, Morlino, et al. to counter the likes of the N(c)SR, America, Commonweal, etc.

  2. Scott W. says:

    How can this be since, according to Notre Dame professor Gary Gutting (see here: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/30/on-being-catholic/ ), “the liberal drive for reform is the best hope of saving the Church. Its greatest present danger is precisely the loss of the members whom the hierarchy and the rest of the conservative core want to marginalize.”? [/tongue-in-cheek]

  3. ocalatrad says:

    Thank the Lord. We need sound liberal arts curricula now more than ever, when the public universities, having completely abandoned God and Christianity, no longer know the reason for their existence. The only apparent aim of the modern liberal curricula is aimlessness. How can a university educate our youth without knowing what virtues, ideas, principles, and morals it intends to convey? The cancer of the universities spreads into society and rots it. We need to know what we are about again.

  4. Random Friar says:

    Are these Ordinariate folks? The name “Walsingham” always perks up my ears.

  5. persyn says:

    Yes. Liberal arts should never be left to the liberals. This is indeed a blessing!

  6. MangiaMamma says:

    That’s great news! My oldest son is at Thomas More College of Liberal Arts in NH and youngest son has just been accepted to Christendom. I know there are many more college bound kids who are looking for a true liberal arts education. We will be praying for this new college and those involved in starting it!

  7. eulogos says:

    This should be a very welcome job opportunity for many graduates of my alma mater, St. John ‘s College (the original “Great Books” school) and for the graduates of TAC, Christendom, Thomas More etc.

    Do you know to whom they should apply? ARE these Ordinariate folks?
    Susan Peterson

  8. Alice Gunther says:

    Very glad to hear this! I have always regretted that there is no orthodox Catholic college in the Archdiocese of New York, where we live. With so many Catholics and so much history here, it is truly a shame and missed opportunity.