I stop looking at news for a couple days and BAMMO! All sorts of weird breaks out.

As I have been traveling, I have not been following a lot of news, ecclesial or secular.   Today, however, some stories invaded and I paid attention.

I have really limited time at the moment, so I will give you the stories.  There is a connection between them.

This will delight certain Jesuits…

«Ok agli atti omosessuali». In Belgio è Chiesa arcobaleno

A Belgian Cardinal – a disciple of Danneels – says that homosexual acts are okay. He says he didn’t think that before (surrrrrre he didn’t…) but he does now. Ain’t he enlightened?

Vescovo austriaco con casula trasparente in plastica

An Austrian bishop with a transparent plastic chasuble. That’s just plain weird. A special kind of creepy weird. He also wants the ordination of women.

«Il Papa non può ammettere l’intercomunione»

The German bishops are going to the zoo about intercommunion. Some bishops went to Rome for a clarification.  I suppressed a chuckle when I read that.  Rome basically punted… which itself was an answer and not a good one.

How not good an answer was it?

Cardinal Eijk of Utrecht explains the situation…. God bless him!

Cardinal Eijk: Pope Francis Needed to Give Clarity on Intercommunion

Here it is… read this carefully. The above shows that things are flying apart with increasing speed and force. Read Card. Eijk.

COMMENTARY: Failure to give German bishops proper directives, based on the clear doctrine and practice of the Church, points to a drift towards apostasy from the truth.

Cardinal Willem Jacobus Eijk

The German bishops’ conference voted by a large majority in favor of directives which entail that a Protestant married to a Catholic may receive the Eucharist after meeting a number of conditions: he must have carried out an examination of conscience with a priest or with another person with pastoral responsibilities; he must have affirmed the faith of the Catholic Church, as well as having wished to put an end to “serious spiritual distress” and to have a “desire to satisfy a longing for the Eucharist.”

Seven members of the German bishops’ conference voted against these directives and sought the opinion of some dicasteries of the Roman Curia. The consequence was that a delegation from the German bishops’ conference spoke in Rome with a delegation from the Roman Curia, including the prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The response of the Holy Father, given through the prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith to the delegation of the German Conference, that the Conference should discuss the drafts again and try to achieve a unanimous result, if possible, is completely incomprehensible. The Church’s doctrine and practice regarding the administration of the Sacrament of the Eucharist to Protestants is perfectly clear. The Code of Canon Law says about this:

“If the danger of death is present or if, in the judgment of the diocesan bishop or conference of bishops, some other grave necessity urges it, Catholic ministers administer these same sacraments licitly also to other Christians not having full communion with the Catholic Church, who cannot approach a minister of their own community and who seek such on their own accord, provided that they manifest Catholic faith in respect to these sacraments and are properly disposed.” C.I.C./1983, can. 844 § 4 (cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) no. 1400).

This therefore applies only to emergencies, especially where there is a risk of death.

Intercommunion is, in principle, only possible with Orthodox Christians, because the Eastern Churches, although not in full communion with the Catholic Church, have true sacraments and above all, by virtue of their apostolic succession, a valid priesthood and a valid Eucharist (CCC no 1400, C.I.C./1983 can. 844, § 3). Their faith in the priesthood, in the Eucharist and also in the Sacrament of Penance is equal to that of the Catholic Church. [Well… okay.  This could be tweaked but it is sound.]

However, Protestants do not share faith in the priesthood and the Eucharist. Most German Protestants are Lutheran. Lutherans believe in consubstantiation, which implies the conviction that, in addition to the Body or Blood of Christ, bread and wine are also present when someone receives them. If someone receives the bread and wine without believing this, the Body and Blood of Christ are not really present. Outside this moment of receiving them, there remains only the bread and wine and the body and blood of Christ are not present.

Obviously, the Lutheran doctrine of consubstantiation differs essentially from the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation, which implies the faith that what is received under the figures of bread and wine, even if administered to someone who does not believe in transubstantiation and even outside the moment of administration, remains the Body or Blood of Christ and that it is no longer the substances of bread and wine.

Because of these essential differences, communion should not be administered to a Protestant, even if married to a Catholic, because the Protestant does not live in full communion with the Catholic Church and, therefore, does not explicitly share faith in her Eucharist. The differences between faith in consubstantiation and that of transubstantiation are so great that one must really demand that someone who wishes to receive Communion explicitly and formally enters into full communion with the Catholic Church (except in case of danger of death) and in this way explicitly confirms his acceptance of the faith of the Catholic Church, including the Eucharist. A private examination of conscience with a priest or with another person with pastoral responsibilities does not give sufficient guarantees that the person involved really accepts the faith of the Church. [Sound familiar?] By accepting it [the Eucharist], the person can, however, do only one thing: enter into full communion with the Catholic Church.  [And we could talk about what they think about “priesthood” and Mass as “Sacrifice”, but we are already at “NO!” with the previous.]

The draft directives of the German bishops’ conference suggest there are only a few cases of Protestants, married to Catholics, who would like to receive Communion by making use of these directives. However, experience shows that in practice these numbers will generally increase. Protestants who are married to Catholics and see other Protestants married to Catholics receiving Communion will think they can do the same. And in the end even Protestants unmarried to Catholics will want to receive it. The general experience with this type of adjustment is that the criteria are quickly extended.

Now the Holy Father has informed the delegation of the German episcopal conference that it must discuss again the draft proposals for a pastoral document on, among other things, administering Communion, and try to find unanimity. Unanimity about what? Assuming that all members of the German bishops’ conference, after having discussed them again, unanimously decide that Communion can be administered to Protestants married to a Catholic (something that will not happen), will this — while being contrary to what the Code of Canon Law and the Catechism of the Catholic Church say in this regard — become the new practice in the Catholic Church in Germany? The practice of the Catholic Church, based on her faith, is not determined and does not change statistically when a majority of an episcopal conference votes in favor of it, not even if unanimously.  [For God so loved the world that He did not send a conference.   I once was chatting with then-Card. Ratzinger about German theology.  With a twinkle he related how relieved he was that Peter stopped in Rome and didn’t go to Germany to establish a Church.  “Imagine,” he said, “the mistakes that could have been made and the efficiency with which we would have made them.”]

What the Code of Canon Law and the Catechism of the Catholic Church say should have been the reaction of the Holy Father, who is, as the Successor of Saint Peter “the perpetual and visible principle and foundation of unity of both the bishops and of the faithful” (Lumen Gentium no. 23). The Holy Father should have given the delegation of the German episcopal conference clear directives, based on the clear doctrine and practice of the Church. He should have also responded on this basis to the Lutheran woman who asked him on November 15, 2015 if she could receive Communion with her Catholic spouse, saying that this is not acceptable instead of suggesting she could receive Communion on the basis of her being baptized, and in accordance with her conscience. By failing to create clarity, great confusion is created among the faithful and the unity of the Church is endangered. This is also the case with cardinals who publicly propose to bless homosexual relationships, something which is diametrically opposed to the doctrine of the Church, founded on Sacred Scripture, that marriage, according to the order of creation, exists only between a man and a woman.

Observing that the bishops and, above all, the Successor of Peter fail to maintain and transmit faithfully and in unity the deposit of faith contained in Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture, I cannot help but think of Article 675 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

“The Church’s ultimate trial

Before Christ’s second coming the Church must pass through a final trial that will shake the faith of many believers. The persecution that accompanies her pilgrimage on earth will unveil the ‘mystery of iniquity’ in the form of a religious deception offering men an apparent solution to their problems at the price of apostasy from the truth.”

+Willem Jacobus Cardinal Eijk

Archbishop of Utrecht, Netherlands

Utrecht, 5 May 2018

Fr. Z kudos.

More good “remedial reading” but in Italian.  This is very good.

In principio era l’azione: il legame tra Amoris Laetitia e l’intercomunione con gli Evangelici

The writer, a good priest, shows the link between the line of thought in Amoris laetitia and the intercommnunion question in Germany and the clear non-answer answer in Rome.

 

Please share!

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in Fr. Z KUDOS, The Coming Storm, The Drill, The future and our choices, You must be joking! and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to I stop looking at news for a couple days and BAMMO! All sorts of weird breaks out.

  1. Atra Dicenda, Rubra Agenda says:

    The centre cannot hold in the widening gyre.

  2. iPadre says:

    I guess they want to destroy the Church. They say the person: “must have carried out an examination of conscience with a priest or with another person with pastoral responsibilities; he must have affirmed the faith of the Catholic Church, as well as having wished to put an end to “serious spiritual distress” and to have a “desire to satisfy a longing for the Eucharist.” Yet they don’t invite that person to become a Catholic. They are setting the person up for a fall. Or rather, setting them selves up for a fall. Anyone with a love for the Church would invite that person to enter into full communion with the Catholic Church, not leave him where he is! You want to share our Communion, become part of the family!

  3. scotus says:

    “The general experience with this type of adjustment is that the criteria are quickly extended.”
    Perish the thought but could that, conceivably, be exactly what is intended. You define the conditions such that it appreas that it only allows a few Protstants to take advantage of it and so making it sound not very radical. But all along the hope (intention?) is that the strict conditions will soon be forgotten by most people and all Protestants will be allowed to receive Comunion at any Catholic Mass?
    Exactly the same tactic used by those pushing for euthanasia. They begin by saying that they only want it under very exceptional circumstances so they they will get approval and then, when the approval is given, they immediately start pushing for more amd more circumstances to be allowed.

  4. APX says:

    An Austrian bishop with a transparent plastic chasuble
    We call that a rain poncho.

  5. robtbrown says:

    Fr Z says,

    A Belgian Cardinal – a disciple of Danneels – says that homosexual acts are okay. He says he didn’t think that before (surrrrrre he didn’t…) but he does now. Ain’t he enlightened?

    An Austrian bishop with a transparent plastic chasuble. That’s just plain weird. A special kind of creepy weird. He also wants the ordination of women.

    Every similar incident is another vote for Cardinal Burke in the next conclave.

    Keep ’em coming .

  6. QuietContemplative says:

    Upon reading Cardinal Eijk’s letter, I was immediately reminded of Pope Francis’s response of putting the deaconette question in committee. How do you kill an idea? Ask for unanimity or committee discussion on it. In other words, it appears he doesn’t want to handle these things and is pushing them off for the next pope. I dislike having such a dim view of the situation, but it seems to be the least unpleasant interpretation possible.

  7. Philmont237 says:

    Clear plastic chasuble.
    Poncho.
    The word they’re looking for is poncho. Specifically a cheap and disposable poncho that are often given out at sporting events when it rains.

  8. Pingback: I stop looking at news for a couple days and BAMMO! All sorts of weird breaks out. | Fr. Z’s Blog | Deaconjohn1987's Blog

  9. michaelthoma says:

    Transparent plastic “vestment”, aka Rain Poncho. These ecclesiastical geniuses really are the ’emperor with no clothes’, which matches their theology perfectly. Let the bishop’s conference adopt this, and any cleric who wears one reveal himself as unfit for office and subsequently de-ponchoed… or let them keep it on while being thrown into the nearest river by the parish grandmother society

  10. JustaSinner says:

    This is what a flock looks like when the Shepard fails them and runs away…

  11. Julia_Augusta says:

    Father Z,

    They all knew you were in Italy.
    When the cat’s away, the mice come out to play.

  12. maternalView says:

    I know a Protestant married to Catholic who says he believes in the transubstantiation and would like to receive communion Her response is great then join the church. He won’t because he doesn’t think you should have to join anything to receive communion. Pointing out to him that he’s s member of several clubs or groups with definite rules didn’t persuade him at all.

    The reality is being a Catholic has certain obligations. Most don’t want that.

  13. CharlesG says:

    If taking Catholic communion is so important to the Protestant spouse, they should just become Catholic.

  14. majuscule says:

    I want a Parish Grandmother Society t-shirt!

  15. monstrance says:

    Now now iPadre,
    Proselytizing is forbidden – so says the Holy Father.

  16. Pingback: All sorts of weird breaks out |

  17. Fr. Reader says:

    What first came to my mind was the “new clothes of the emperor”, which already michaeltoma mentioned.
    Is this for “pastoral reasons” or what? who is asking for this?

  18. JonPatrick says:

    It is OK for Protestants married to Catholics to receive communion – as long as they don’t try to take it kneeling and on the tongue.

    Such is the state of the Church today.

  19. Legisperitus says:

    Motus in fine velocior.

  20. Pingback: Weird and more weird | Fr. Z’s Blog | Deaconjohn1987's Blog

  21. Simon_GNR says:

    CharlesG is absolutely right with his comment: If you want to receive the Church’s sacraments, become a member of the Church. Simple. Why do these German bishops not see it? And the fact that Pope Francis hasn’t categorically dismissed their idea of giving Catholic communion to Protestants exemplifies what a poor leader this pope is. Let’s hope we get a better pope next time – I’d be quite happy with Card. Burke.

  22. IacobusM says:

    Do a detect a “Draft Cardinal Burke” movement stirring in the comments above? That works for me, although my personal preference is Cardinal Sarah – imagine what the German bishops would have to say about that!

  23. bobk says:

    It would seem that receiving communion without being in communion is the same thing as being in the bridal chamber without being married, no? Surprising the German authorities have missed the main image of Christians in relation to Christ. Maybe ask them what they tell people about that sacrament too?

    The clear vestment looks like a collision with a shower curtain. Probably fairly humid, doesn’t breathe well, bad idea. However a good medium for traced handprints that were once in vogue for burlap-and-felt versions of vestments about 40 years ago.

  24. bibi1003 says:

    A Belgian cardinal says that homosexual acts are OK.

    Our bishop, when interviewed about this subject said, “Well, we see it in the animal world…”.

  25. Pingback: Cardinal Eijk: Pope Francis Needed to Give Clarity on Intercommunion |

Do you have a comment? Think BEFORE posting! Proof read. For special characters use Unicode.