PHOTOS: 1 July – Pontifical Mass at the Throne for Persecuted Christians @MadisonDiocese

On 1 July, His Excellency Most Reverend Robert C. Morlino, by the grace of God and the Apostolic See Bishop of Madison (aka The Extraordinary Ordinary), sang a Pontifical Mass at the Throne in the Roman Rite’s traditional form.

Holy Mass was offered for the intention of Persecuted Christians around the globe.  In addition to the orations for the Most Precious Blood, orations were added from the beautiful Mass “in tempore belli… in time of war”.

His Excellency granted a plenary indulgence, under the normal conditions, to all those who participated.

This Mass occasioned the use, for the first time, of the red silk damask vestments obtained by the Tridentine Mass Society of the Diocese of Madison (501(c)(3)).

Here are some photos, to give you a taste.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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27 Responses to PHOTOS: 1 July – Pontifical Mass at the Throne for Persecuted Christians @MadisonDiocese

  1. Fr. Hamilton says:

    Beautiful pics! I know and studied with some of those fine priests of Madison.

    Though I minister at an Oridnary Form parish I stopped distributing the Precious Blood from chalices a couple of years ago. I am occasionally questioned about that since the Lord’s command is quite clearly eat and drink. Thus, I wonder is there any tendency among Extraordinary Form Catholics to ask why the Precious Blood is not distributed widely (especially since that form has maintained a feast dedicated to the Precious Blood)? Any traditional priests care to chime in with experience here?

  2. Fr. Hamilton says: Any traditional priests care to chime in

    I don’t recall ever being asked for this, except in one situation wherein a person had a hard time swallowing solids. Generally, traditional Catholics get the fact that in each Host we receive the Body, BLOOD, Soul and Divinity of our Lord.

  3. mike cliffson says:

    Import ant the reasons, the most important the sacrifice of the mass itself
    Nonetheless
    I ppreciate that Catholic. Eye candy. Thanks

  4. 21stCentury Anglican says:

    How beautiful…

  5. jameeka says:

    “This vision did not disappoint”!

    (Playing off the Episcopal Motto….)

  6. robtbrown says:

    Fr Hamilton says,

    Though I minister at an Oridnary Form parish I stopped distributing the Precious Blood from chalices a couple of years ago. I am occasionally questioned about that since the Lord’s command is quite clearly eat and drink.

    I’ll let St Thomas answer. From his Commentary on the Fourth Gospel:

    . . . it was the custom of the early Church for all to receive both the body and blood of Christ; and certain Churches have still retained this practice, where even those assisting at the altar always receive the body and blood. But in some Churches, due to the danger of spilling the blood, the custom is for it to be received only by the priest, while the rest receive Christ’s body. Even so, this is not acting against our Lord’s command, because whoever receives Christ’s body receives his blood also, since the entire Christ is present under each species, even his body and blood. But under the species of bread, Christ’s body is present in virtue of the conversion, and his blood is present by natural concomitance; while under the species of wine, his blood is present in virtue of the conversion, and his body by natural concomitance.

  7. benedetta says:

    Very beautiful to see. The red vestments are very striking and noble.

  8. jhayes says:

    robtbrown, while accepting Thomas’s conclusion that either form is sufficient by itself, the Third Edition of the Roman Missal says (in the GIRM)

    281. Holy Communion has a fuller form as a sign when it takes place under both kinds. For in this form the sign of the Eucharistic banquet is more clearly evident and clearer expression is given to the divine will by which the new and eternal Covenant is ratified in the Blood of the Lord, as also the connection between the Eucharistic banquet and the eschatological banquet in the Kingdom of the Father.[104]

    [Which changes… what?]

  9. Elizabeth D says:

    Why are the deacon and subdeacon wearing surplices rather than albs?

  10. Semper Gumby says:

    Great photos Fr. Z. Interesting quote robtbrown.

  11. ClavesCoelorum says:

    Elizabeth, no. The ones in surplices are the assistant deacons at the throne. I learnt that from Father Z after seeing a picture of Cardinal Pacelli with similar attendance.

    Father, beautiful vestments! Now you need tassels on that fascia… :)

  12. baileymxd says:

    Beautiful!!!!.

    Only comment…schola singers reading on tablets computers? How can you rehearse and not have physical music to mark??? I suppose its possible they have music apps that allow for edits, but I have found there is more of a mental response and quicker absorption of the music when reading from a liber as opposed to digital copies.

  13. Henry Edwards says:

    “Holy Communion has a fuller form as a sign when it takes place under both kinds.”

    Is this an example of an English sentence which conveys no precise meaning? What precisely is meant by “a fuller form as a sign”? Does this phrase have a logical meaning? One that does not contradict Church teaching that “whoever receives Christ’s body receives his blood also, since the entire Christ is present under each species”. Or does the quoted GIRM sentence constitute a mere feeling or sentiment rather than an intelligible teaching?

  14. robtbrown says:

    Jhayes,

    281. Holy Communion has a fuller form as a sign when it takes place under both kinds. For in this form the sign of the Eucharistic banquet is more clearly evident and clearer expression is given to the divine will by which the new and eternal Covenant is ratified in the Blood of the Lord, as also the connection between the Eucharistic banquet and the eschatological banquet in the Kingdom of the Father.[104]

    I have no problem with the above. That’s why I think it should be saved for special occasions–e.g., weddings and religious vows.

  15. robtbrown says:

    Staying with the “fuller form as a sign” argument:

    As a sign of the transcendence of Catholic Culture and the Mystery of the Church, Latin liturgy has a fuller form than the vernacular.

  16. jhayes says:

    After a discuussion of the doctrine of concomitance, the USCCB Norms on Communion under both kinds says:

    16. At the same time an appreciation for reception of “the whole Christ” through one species should not diminish in any way the fuller sign value of reception of Holy Communion under both kinds. For just as Christ offered his whole self, body and blood, as a sacrifice for our sins, so too is our reception of his Body and Blood under both kinds an especially fitting participation in his memorial of eternal life.

    HERE

  17. Ben Yanke says:

    Elizabeth,

    The clerics in surplices and dalmatics are deacons at the throne. They are a unique feature of the Mass at the Throne, and are there to uniquely assist the bishop.

    The deacon and subdeacon for the Mass were Frs. Gernetzke and Ihm, and as you see, they are vested in alb and dalmatics/tunicle.

  18. Ben Yanke says:

    baileymxd,

    As one of the singers singing from a tablet, I actually do it out of convenience. I began doing it several years ago after my heavy bag with music books began causing me back problems.

    On top of that, android’s adobe PDF reader allows easy notation, including hand drawn ones, meaning that I can write on my music as if it were paper (which I do quite often, especially with polyphony).

    Now by bringing my tablet, I have a plethora of books full of sacred music, several of which I use every Mass.

    More details below in a post I wrote on the topic:
    http://www.chantcafe.com/2015/03/technology-for-church-singer-choral.html

  19. robtbrown says:

    See my comment above re special occasions

  20. baileymxd says:

    @ben yanke

    I hear you loud and clear. I’ve currently got 3 2inch binders full of polyphonic Masses, motets, and misc. I just prep my music ahead of time in an extra 4th binder labelled performance. Phew!! It’s personal preference.

    I always like to have everyone look uniform in my schola, so if they choose to use a tablet I ask them to hide it behind a black binder. But to me, nothing smells better than an old liber.

  21. PostCatholic says:

    Congratulations on the new vestments. This is some good photojournalism–it conveys the solemn ceremony. The last time you posted pictures of Bishop Morlino, I remarked that the sanctuary seemed too crowded for the ambition of the ceremony. This time, not so.

    [If you remarked that the last time, the space was too small, you were wrong. It was fine. Photos don’t always convey space well. And thanks for the congrats on the vestments. They are beautiful!]

  22. Ben Yanke says:

    baileymxd ,

    I hear you! Last time I did some rough math on the number of pages of music I have synced to my tablet, it was in the realm of tens of thousands. Not only is it a back saver, but an amazing reference, allowing me to have things I would never ever have randomly.

    Had I not also been taking pictures (about half of them above are mine, mainly the ones before Mass and those taken from the angle a little behind the throne ;) ), I probably would have sang on the right half of the schola, and none would have been the wiser. And normally we’re in the loft anyways, so I wasn’t expecting to be in the gospel side transept. Atlas, renovation construction dust prevented us from going up at the last minute, at least if we wanted to keep our surplices relatively clean…

  23. acardnal says:

    jhayes wrote,
    “After a discuussion [sic] of the doctrine of concomitance, the USCCB Norms on Communion under both kinds says: . . .”

    The USCCB has NO doctrinal authority. What they state on any matter can usually be ignored unless it has been approved by the Holy See.

    When profanation of the precious blood is common, as it is in the USA, the bishop as chief liturgist for his diocese must take precautionary measures.

  24. That’s now officially enough about the “both kinds” issue. Move on.

  25. Father K says:

    Why does the bishop not wear gloves during the recessional?

    [Because … he doesn’t.]

  26. Mary Jane says:

    Amazing photos Fr Z. The new vestments are beautiful!

    I wanted to chime in about singing music from an electronic device, because my husband and I both do this. We both sing in several chant / polyphony choirs, and we both have iPads with all our music loaded on them (it took me hours to get our huge music library scanned and loaded onto our devices, but in doing this we were able to eliminate the need to manage huge heavy binders/heavy Liber Usualis/heavy bags/multiple binders to organize music for different feasts, etc). Now that the music is loaded, the only time we have to ever manage or organize anything is if we get a new mass setting or motet from our music director (in which case I scan the music, load it onto the devices, and then we turn it back in). No more hole punching, paper flipping, wondering “where in my binder did I file that motet!?”, etc.

    The apps we use are “Liber Pro” (which my hubby is actually the developer of) for chants and “Forzando” (a music library organizing app that my hubby is also the developer of) for motets and mass settings.

    Another plus to using an electronic device…we were able to see our music during Tenebrae this past Holy Week without needing a flashlight or candle! ;-)

  27. Father K says:

    [Because … he doesn’t.] what a stupid response.