Contrasts of projected visions of the Church

At Church Militant, Michael Voris posted a sort of summary video commentary in the aftermath of the Synod (“walking together”).  What caught my eye comes at the end of his video commentary.  Michael juxtaposed images of the Summorum Pontificum procession to St. Peter’s (which I was in) and a truly bizarre, frankly demonic, digital projection light show on the facade of the Basilica of Santa Maria sopra Minerva, in the heart of Rome near the Pantheon.  This is the church with the famous elephant, and the tombs of St. Catherine of Siena and of Beato Angelico.

You decide.

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11 Responses to Contrasts of projected visions of the Church

  1. (X)MCCLXIII says:

    Come on, Mike! Tell us what you really think.

    Actually, I quite like his style. We do need some of that. And it occurred to me while I watched that it might not be a bad thing if some American bishops really did end up in gaol. (What was it Cardinal George said about that?) What has the world come to, when faithful Catholics think such thoughts!

  2. Atra Dicenda, Rubra Agenda says:

    Santa Maria sopra Minerva is a special place to me.

    I’ve been to Rome only twice, but both times I found myself in a special state of peace inside the starry dome of that Church before the repose of St. Catherine of Siena.

    I feel anger, again, so many times since July…..

  3. PetersBarque says:

    Thank you to everyone who is manning up and proclaiming the truth. Those videos are a visual of the contrast between Heaven and Hell. Did you notice the exploding bricks turn rainbow-colored on their way down? Speaking of rainbows, a person who self-identifies has become their own god; they are teetering on the precipice of Hell. And yet, PF and his ilk think we should kindly accompany these delusional egomaniacs as they go the way of those exploding rainbow-colored bricks.

  4. NBW says:

    I found the whole video on youtube. I watched it; it’s truly like the devil…it’s unimaginative, sophomoric, and uninspiring. Slight hints of rainbow colors were featured through out this dark and demonic light show. Pray fervently and ask God to purify and cleanse His Church!!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKkziFNQuOQ

  5. Spinmamma says:

    Thank you, NBW, for the YouTube link. I too watched it all–it is not long, and found it disturbing and macabre, even without reading any further meaning into it. That meaning, however, is hard to avoid considering the distortions and apparent destruction of the building upon which the “show” was projected. It left me with two questions: 1. Who, exactly. was responsible for the creation and approval of this “light show” ? 2. What is their explanation for its purpose in terms of its expected effect upon its intended audience?

  6. adriennep says:

    I had the same question: When, Where, and Why was this light show done? Not to be confused with the animals and monkey light show on the Vatican…probably the same company got the bid.

  7. adriennep says:

    I had the same question: When, Where, and Why was this light show done? Not to be confused with the animals and monkey light show on the Vatican…probably the same company got the bid.

  8. Ellen says:

    Ugh! St. Catherine of Siena is my confirmation saint and that display disgusts me. It’s gross and ugly.

  9. Discipula says:

    I saw the video on YouTube. The multi-colored outlines of the bricks as they flew over the crowd didn’t look rainbow colored exactly. It reminded me more of the 3d craze, where everyone wore these special glasses at certain movies and various items (or body parts) would appear to reach out of the screen and go over the audience’s head. It makes sense.

    The light show seemed more of a technical bragging session than real art show, but then again I’ve been to an art gallery recently. It’s a bit depressing what passes as art these days.

  10. majuscule says:

    Has anyone viewed that light show with 3-D glasses? I can’t find the pair I got with a 3-D DVD or I would do it myself. Those “rainbow” looking edges sure look like what you see without glasses in an old 3-D movie

    The light show is pagan at the least but more likely diabolical. Why would anyone think this is a good thing?

  11. aiello01 says:

    Vatican II formalized what Catholics need to know for the future of the Church. The Church is not centered solely on the behavior of the hierarchy. It should not be a crisis for the individual Catholic if the hierarchy is not faithful to what it means to be Christian. There are other options. Here are a few quotes from Vatican II that should encourage us all.
    Vatican II’s Lumen Gentium 12 says: “The entire body of the faithful, anointed as they are by the Holy One,(111) [cf. 1 Jn 2:20, 27] cannot err in matters of belief. They manifest this special property by means of the whole peoples’ supernatural discernment in matters of faith when “from the Bishops down to the last of the lay faithful” (8*) [Cf. 1 Cor. 10: 17] they show universal agreement in matters of faith and morals. That discernment in matters of faith is aroused and sustained by the Spirit of truth.” This is quite a statement coming from the magisterium. Our own personal discernment contributes the whole of Church infallibility. If we have the Holy Spirit, we all have a stake in the infallibility of the Church according to V2, both clergy and laity.
    We can all contribute to tradition. There is an interesting quote from Dei Verbum 8 which states: “This tradition which comes from the Apostles develop in the Church with the help of the Holy Spirit. (5) For there is a growth in the understanding of the realities and the words which have been handed down. This happens through the contemplation and study made by believers, who treasure these things in their hearts (see Luke, 2:19, 51) through a penetrating understanding of the spiritual realities which they experience, and through the preaching of those who have received through episcopal succession the sure gift of truth.”
    Fortunately, we have easy access to Scripture nowadays, and we can use it for our personal instruction. Dei Verbum 21 says: “Therefore, like the Christian religion itself, all the preaching of the Church must be nourished and regulated by Sacred Scripture.”
    We have options.